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Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
cClellan's army in 1862, Halleck reports that On the first of August I ordered General Burnside to immediately embark his troops at Newport News [on the James River], transfer them to Acquia Creek [near Washington], and take position opposite Fredericksburg. This officer moved with great promptness, and reached Acquia Creek on the night of the third. It also happened that I was proven right, for in the summer Lee did send Early to make an attack on Washington with his corps, it being known giving information of the movements of General Grant. The first stated that on Friday night Lee's army was in full retreat for Richmond, Grant pursuing; that Hancock had passed Spottsylvania Court-House, on the morning of the 8th; and that Fredericksburg was occupied by Federal forces. See Appendix No. 35. This was followed by the information that another despatch from Grant had just been received at the War Department; that he was marching with his whole army to make a junction with me,
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
and North Carolina, with headquarters at Fortress Monroe. The Union forces were then in occupatiog he would certainly have taken a ride to Fortress Monroe to greet an old friend of his who would h day of April, General Grant came down to Fortress Monroe to consult with me as to the campaign agathirty thousand troops from Washington to Fortress Monroe, and the whole country was ransacked for rt my army from Yorktown, Gloucester, and Fortress Monroe in twenty-four hours, so as to be up the lmore will be ordered to report to you at Fortress Monroe, with all the troops on transports, by thn Mr. Lincoln's confidence, came to me at Fortress Monroe. This was after a high position in the ch co-operative movement before he came to Fortress Monroe, and that Smith himself was quite impressd of Brig.-Gen. E. W. Hincks, embarked at Fortress Monroe. At sunrise of the 5th, General Kautz, wd at the necessity for waiting for him at Fortress Monroe, and instructed him to push forward. S[8 more...]
Harrisburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ly and respectfully as a Vice-President should do. No, no, my friend. To be serious, tell the President I will do everything I can to aid his election if he is nominated, and that I hope he will be, as until this war is finished there should be no change of administration. I am sorry you won't go on with us, replied my friend, but I think you are sound in your judgment. The following is a statement of the matter made by Mr. Cameron during his lifetime:-- I had been summoned from Harrisburg by the President to consult with him in relation to the approaching campaign. He was holding a reception when I arrived, but after it was over we had a long and earnest conversation. Mr. Lincoln had been much distressed at the intrigues in and out of his Cabinet to defeat his renomination; but that was now assured, and the question of a man for the second place on the ticket was freely and earnestly discussed. Mr. Lincoln thought and so did I that Mr. Hamlin's position during the four y
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
was the highest point ever reached by the navy until after the surrender of Richmond. The admiral also doubted whether it was possible to make the movement a surprise, and argued strenuously against an attempt by the joint expedition to go above City Point,--Osborn, the point proposed by me, being almost twenty miles beyond by the river. To divert the enemy's attention, all the white troops were concentrated at Yorktown and Gloucester Point, and all the colored infantry and artillery at Hampton, the colored cavalry at Williamsburg, and all the white cavalry at the line beyond Norfolk in the direction of Suffolk. About the 1st of May West Point, at the head of York River, was seized, preparations were made for building wharves and landings, and fortifications were begun, as if with the intention of making this the base of operations for a junction with Grant's army. General Meigs, quartermaster-general, was of opinion that it would be nearly, if not quite impossible to gather
Chesapeake Bay (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
, the enemy held the intervening territory, and the only communication between these places was by water by travelling a distance of from 120 to 170 miles. This opinion was reported to the War Department, but no action was taken, and I did not feel at liberty to order the evacuation of either place. November 16, an expedition under Colonel Quinn, with 450 men of the One Hundred and Forty-Eighth New York Volunteers, captured a rebel marine brigade organized to prey upon the commerce of Chesapeake Bay, and a dangerous nest of pirates was broken up. November 27, Colonel Draper, with the Sixth U. S. Colored Troops, made a successful raid into the counties lying on the sounds in Virginia and North Carolina, capturing and dispersing organized guerillas. December 4, Brigadier-General Wilde, at the head of two regiments of colored troops, overran all the counties as far as Chowan River, releasing some two thousand slaves and inflicting much damage upon the enemy. December 13, Briga
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
s, celerity, distance, and secrecy, was never before equalled, in any particular, in the history of war. On the 30th of April I received from General Grant my final orders, See Appendix No. 23. to start my forces on the night of the 4th of May so as to get up James River as far as possible by daylight the next morning, and to push on with the greatest energy from that time for the accomplishment of the object designated in the plan of campaign. General Gillmore did not arrive from Charleston until the 3d of May, so that I was deprived of the full opportunity of organizing the Tenth Corps, and did not have so much consultation with him upon the plans of the movement as was desirable. His reasons for the delay were substantially set forth in a letter which I addressed to General Grant on the 20th of April. See Appendix No. 24. The iron-clads had not come up, and both these causes of delay were sources of great anxiety as well to the lieutenant-general as to the general com
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
when one should be called for in the other loyal States. This order was vigorously protested against by Governor Pierpont, and this was all the assistance the United States ever received from the loyal government of Virginia in defending the State. My predecessors in command had endeavored to recruit a regiment of loyal Virginianck, commanding in North Carolina, Pickett replied, that being deserters they were executed by his orders, and if retaliation was attempted he would execute ten United States soldiers for every one upon whom we retaliated, unless, indeed, the Confederates were deserters from our army, in which case hanging them would be proper. As ndidate for re-election, as I suppose it is proper for me to be. Now, every one of my equals has a right to be a candidate against me, and every citizen of the United States is my equal who is not my subordinate. Now, if you desire to be a candidate I will give you the present opportunity to be one by making you my equal and not m
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
. December 4, Brigadier-General Wilde, at the head of two regiments of colored troops, overran all the counties as far as Chowan River, releasing some two thousand slaves and inflicting much damage upon the enemy. December 13, Brigadier-General Wistar sent a force from Williamsburg to Charles City Court-House and captured two companies of rebel cavalry, being the outposts of Richmond. The force was gallantly led by Col. Robert West. The army being much in need of recruits, and Eastern Virginia claiming to be a fully organized loyal State, by permission of the President an enrolment of all the able-bodied loyal citizens of Virginia within my command was ordered for the purposes of a draft, when one should be called for in the other loyal States. This order was vigorously protested against by Governor Pierpont, and this was all the assistance the United States ever received from the loyal government of Virginia in defending the State. My predecessors in command had endeavored
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
hat can be spared from garrison duty,--I should say not less than twenty thousand men — to operate on the south side of James River, Richmond being your objective point. To the force you already have will be added about ten thousand men from South Carolina, under Major-General Gillmore, who will command them in person. Maj.-Gen. W. F. Smith is ordered to report to you, to command the troops sent into the field from your own department. General Gillmore will be ordered to report to you at Fome time I received a despatch which showed that the enemy had withdrawn from North Carolina, and might be concentrating upon Richmond to form a junction with Lee. See Appendix No. 39. The enemy had already withdrawn all their troops from South Carolina. While meditating upon all this information, the correctness of which I could not doubt, for it had been sent from General Grant for my guidance, I was roused by a communication from both of my corps commanders, in the handwriting of General
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
pickets of the garrison of those cities in North Carolina. Upon inspection of these several postsemonstrance by General Peck, commanding in North Carolina, Pickett replied, that being deserters thelly around Richmond were away operating in North Carolina, the enemy, relying upon the almost impassarticularly the topography of Virginia and North Carolina and that, too, in connection with the campSmith, as to the movements of the enemy in North Carolina, the subject of my proposed army co-operatould be a means of relieving our forces in North Carolina from their impending danger. Meanwhile, o for two and a half millions of rations to North Carolina. With this fact in view, knowing that GenSmith had strongly advised a movement into North Carolina instead of up the James, and fearing lest o say that if a movement upon the enemy in North Carolina was intended, as I was inclined to believe which he assured me that no operations in North Carolina were intended, and that it was his wish th[4 more...]
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