hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benjamin F. Butler 1,260 10 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 1,168 12 Browse Search
United States (United States) 1,092 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 694 24 Browse Search
David D. Porter 362 4 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 358 8 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 335 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 333 1 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 308 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 282 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. Search the whole document.

Found 898 total hits in 151 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Proctor (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e temporarily, I came to the conclusion to take command in person of this movement so that nothing should be lost because of any disagreement between my corps commanders, neither of whom really desired that the other should succeed. At daybreak on the 12th, all the movements were made in conformity with these orders. Brigadier-General Ames' brigade was posted near Port Walthall Junction to cover our rear from the enemy's forces arriving at Petersburg from the South. The enemy met us at Proctor or Mill Creek, and after several severe engagements were forced back into their first line of works around Drury's Bluff. As soon as the roads by Chesterfield Court-House were opened by our advance, in obedience to the instructions of the lieutenant-general, General Kautz was sent with his cavalry by those roads to cut the Danville Railroad and the James River Canal. He was not able to strike the canal, but cut the road near Appomattox Station, and thence marched along the line of the roa
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ause it is all inland navigation. In the re-transfer of McClellan's army in 1862, Halleck reports that On the first of August I ordered General Burnside to immediately embark his troops at Newport News [on the James River], transfer them to Acquia Creek [near Washington], and take position opposite Fredericksburg. This officer moved with great promptness, and reached Acquia Creek on the night of the third. It also happened that I was proven right, for in the summer Lee did send Early to Acquia Creek on the night of the third. It also happened that I was proven right, for in the summer Lee did send Early to make an attack on Washington with his corps, it being known that quite all the veteran troops had been drawn to the Army of the Potomac, and substantially all others. Early began his attack upon Washington, and Wright with his Sixth Corps was sent from City Point by water, and I sent a portion of the Nineteenth Corps, and although the transportation was by no means conducted with all the celerity possible, yet our troops got to Washington in time to repulse Early's attack. Grant seemed very
Alfred Terry (search for this): chapter 16
he 9th was going on, the enemy, advancing from Richmond upon our rear, attacked the covering force of the Tenth Corps under Colonel Voorhis of the Sixty-Seventh Ohio, and for a moment forced him back, although he gallantly held his position. General Terry, with the reserve of that corps, advanced from Port Walthall Junction. Two pieces of artillery that had been lost were re-captured by a gallant achievement of the Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, under Lieutenant-Colonel Roman, who drove the enemy back with loss to them of three hundred killed. The woods from which the enemy had been driven took fire under a high wind and their dead and severely wounded were burned. General Terry held his position till night and then withdrew to his place in line. As Brigadier-General Turner's division was retiring, General Hagood, by authority of General Bushrod Johnson of the Confederate forces, sent a flag of truce asking permission to bury their dead and to bring off their wounded, which was g
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 16
enemy, and Kilpatrick's men being recruiting from their march at Yorktown, I asked his aid to meet this advance, which was promptly and kindly given, and the movement of the enemy handsomely met and repulsed. When I had reported for duty to Mr. Stanton in obedience to his order to take command, he informed me of the probable importance of my department in the campaign of the coming spring and summer, in which would be a movement upon Richmond. Whereupon in all my spare moments I examined pallmore to move to his front and demonstrate against the railroad for that purpose. He reported to me that he did not make the movement for reasons which appeared to him perfectly satisfactory. On the same morning I received a telegram from Mr. Stanton, giving such information as the department possessed in regard to the operations of General Grant, a copy of which I at once sent to my two corps commanders, Generals Gillmore and Smith, accompanied by despatches urging upon them the necessity
Wm F. Smith (search for this): chapter 16
emed to me, when I wrote it, to be just, as it did at the time of the occurrence, and so I choose to let it stand; but since then I have seen publications in which it appears that after General Sheridan called on me and received my orders,--which he disobeyed,--he had a consultation upon the situation with Maj.-Gen. Wm F. Smith, and got advice from him as to what he should do, which seems to have determined his conduct. So that censure, and very much more, belongs to Smith. Decorative Motif.emed to me, when I wrote it, to be just, as it did at the time of the occurrence, and so I choose to let it stand; but since then I have seen publications in which it appears that after General Sheridan called on me and received my orders,--which he disobeyed,--he had a consultation upon the situation with Maj.-Gen. Wm F. Smith, and got advice from him as to what he should do, which seems to have determined his conduct. So that censure, and very much more, belongs to Smith. Decorative Motif.
William F. Smith (search for this): chapter 16
int, Bermuda Hundred, and Petersburg. In consultation with Gen. Wm. F. Smith, as to the movements of the enemy in North Carolina, the subjg it to that State, was discussed with General Grant at his visit. Smith very much favored it, saying our army should be called the Army of Cape Fear River. I learned afterwards from General Smith that General Grant had considerably favored such co-operative movement before he came to Fortress Monroe, and that Smith himself was quite impressed with it, as, among other things, it would be a means of relieving our forceations to North Carolina. With this fact in view, knowing that General Smith had strongly advised a movement into North Carolina instead of and thinking perhaps, also, that he might have desired to give General Smith a separate command, if it would not interfere with mine, I sent General Smith, at his own request, to General Grant, bearing a letter in which I took leave to say that if a movement upon the enemy in Nort
William Smith (search for this): chapter 16
n — to operate on the south side of James River, Richmond being your objective point. To the force you already have will be added about ten thousand men from South Carolina, under Major-General Gillmore, who will command them in person. Maj.-Gen. W. F. Smith is ordered to report to you, to command the troops sent into the field from your own department. General Gillmore will be ordered to report to you at Fortress Monroe, with all the troops on transports, by the 18th instant, or as soon twell to the lieutenant-general as to the general commanding the department. See Appendix No. 25. On the 4th of May the embarkation began at Yorktown, See Appendix No. 26. of the Tenth and Eighteenth Army Corps, under the command of Generals W. F. Smith and Q. A. Gillmore, amounting to about twenty-five thousand men. The colored troops (part of the Eighteenth Corps), about fifty-five hundred men, under command of Brig.-Gen. E. W. Hincks, embarked at Fortress Monroe. At sunrise of the 5th
W. F. Smith (search for this): chapter 16
tly into Richmond. I called on my generals, Smith and Gillmore, and explained this plan. I saidroops which I had ordered should report to General Smith, were still under his own command; and beceutenant-General Grant. Another letter of General Smith See Appendix No. 44. shows the state of, how they could thwart and interfere with me. Smith's letter shows that Gillmore would do nothing in the world to aid Smith. I did not then think Smith was quite in that frame of mind towards GillSmith was quite in that frame of mind towards Gillmore, but other evidence has shown me that he was. Indeed, as will appear, it was impossible even tder one division of his corps to report to General Smith with two days rations ready to march at an point that may be attacked. Of course, General Smith's demonstration will cover the right of General Gillmore's line of works, unless he [General Smith] is forced back. General Kautz has orderswas sent to endeavor to turn their right while Smith attacked the front. Both movements were galla[17 more...]
Edward W. Smith (search for this): chapter 16
overnment regarding Reprisals Wistar's attempted surprise of Richmond and capture of Davis frustrated advantages of occupying Bermuda hundred noted: Grant and Butler plan its occupation presidential election of 1864 both Lincoln and Chase offer Butler the Vice-presidency embarkation at Yorktown and seizure of City Point Drury's Bluff should have been seized at once fortifying the neck minor demonstrations misleading despatches from the Army of the Potomac Butler's Corps commanders, Smith and Gillmore, insubordinate and hostile the fighting around Drury's Bluff false despatches of Grant's successes Butler supposes him rapidly approaching and acts accordingly On the second day of November, 1863, without solicitation, I was detailed to the command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, with headquarters at Fortress Monroe. The Union forces were then in occupation of the peninsula between the York and James Rivers, up to the line of Williamsburg, the cities of
oss to both sides. On the morning of the 9th, General Sheridan started on a raid against the enemy's lines of as below set forth. At evening of the 14th General Sheridan was reported by Lieutenant-Colonel Fuller, chirage. I telegraphed to Colonel Fuller to give General Sheridan all the forage and rations he needed. See Ao. 50. Later in the day I sent a despatch to General Sheridan requesting that he join me with his command, aterview at the earliest moment. On the 15th General Sheridan called on me at the front, and in conference w with me before that time, and deeming that if General Sheridan's command, numbering four thousand effective mturned out to graze. See Appendix No. 53. General Sheridan on the next day sent me a copy of his instructountry. This statement implies a censure on General Sheridan. It seemed to me, when I wrote it, to be justen publications in which it appears that after General Sheridan called on me and received my orders,--which he
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...