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felt called upon to make my election as between the Union and the rebel cause as publicly as possible, that my old friends in the South might understand that they had nothing to expect from me, and to manifest before the country my sense of duty as an officer of the Government. Upon making my report at the War Office, and asking for orders, I was not long in discovering that the public affairs of Missouri--especially in the city of St. Louis — were very much under the influence of the two Blairs, Montgomery and Frank — the former the Postmaster-General, then in Washington; the latter a lawyer in St. Louis, who had recently been active in raising a volunteer force in the city of St. Louis, then immediately designed for the protection of the United States Arsenal on the Mississippi River, in the southern suburb of the city. It will be the province of history to recite the suspicious proceedings of the Legislature of the State of Missouri, in authorizing military organizations in di
Montgomery Blair (search for this): chapter 82
dvice from the authorities at Washington, communicated, perhaps, through Mr. Montgomery Blair; and that the military authorities at the arsenal had been instructed byould not give me orders to return to St. Louis without first knowing how Mr. Montgomery Blair might feel disposed in regard to his doing so. As I had never had any otndly relations with both of the Blairs, I did not hesitate to speak with Mr. Montgomery Blair on the subject, and I understood from him distinctly that he had no objereatly to my astonishment that I heard, some weeks afterward, that so soon as Mr. Blair heard of the order for my return to St. Louis, he went in great haste to the ned that he had given the order, and, as he supposed, with the approbation of Mr. Blair; and as he had given the order he did not wish to countermand it. After some displace me from the command, should be confidentially placed in the hand of Mr. Blair, to be sent by him to his brother Frank, then acting as a colonel of voluntee
Frank Blair (search for this): chapter 82
step for the State to declare herself with the South. Among those who very clearly saw the purpose of this camp was Frank Blair, who had been appointed a colonel of volunteers, and had been stationed at the arsenal with his own regiment and otherly the origin of the first movement made from the arsenal — whether it was made on the suggestion of General Lyon, Colonel Frank Blair, or that of the Committee of Safety. But on the tenth day of May, 1861, in the middle of the day, when no one in that during several weeks of very delicate and important duty in St. Louis, I was almost daily in intercourse with Colonel Frank Blair, confidentially conferring with him and trusting him as I would have done a friend, fully relied upon as such; hiscising control in the State. In the midst of this quiescent state of things, what can express my astonishment when Colonel Blair determined to make use of the order to supersede me, which accordingly was laid upon me, and I was deprived of the co
May 19th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 82
Doc. 20.-General Harney's Report. St. Louis, Mo., May 19, 1864. To the Adjutant-General United States Army, Washington, D. C.: General: I have the honor to forward a statement of my services since 1861, in obedience to the circular addressed to me from your office. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. S. Harney, Brigadier-General. Having been desired from the Adjutant-General's office, to make a statement of the events with which I have been more or less connected, as a public officer, since the breaking out of the present rebellion, I make the following brief reference to them. I was in command of the Western Department when the first overt acts of the rebels startled the country — not then prepared to anticipate the great results which followed. I was suddenly surprised by an order calling me to Washington, and set out immediately in obedience to it. At that moment Harper's Ferry was in possession of the rebels; but this fact had not bec
May 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 82
at Washington, communicated, perhaps, through Mr. Montgomery Blair; and that the military authorities at the arsenal had been instructed by the Secretary of War to make no movement without first consulting the Committee of Safety, and to do nothing except upon their approval. I have never known precisely the origin of the first movement made from the arsenal — whether it was made on the suggestion of General Lyon, Colonel Frank Blair, or that of the Committee of Safety. But on the tenth day of May, 1861, in the middle of the day, when no one in the city or in Camp Jackson anticipated the movement, the military force at the arsenal was suddenly put in march toward the city. One portion of it passed through the midst of the city, whilst another marched along the western outskirts of the city; and the march of the two portions was so well-timed and measured, that Camp Jackson was completely surrounded before any measures could be taken by its inmates for either escape or defence. An
Doc. 20.-General Harney's Report. St. Louis, Mo., May 19, 1864. To the Adjutant-General United States Army, Washington, D. C.: General: I have the honor to forward a statement of my services since 1861, in obedience to the circular addressed to me from your office. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. S. Harney, Brigadier-General. Having been desired from the Adjutant-General's office, to make a statement of the events with which I have been more or less connected, as a public officer, since the breaking out of the present rebellion, I make the following brief reference to them. I was in command of the Western Department when the first overt acts of the rebels startled the country — not then prepared to anticipate the great results which followed. I was suddenly surprised by an order calling me to Washington, and set out immediately in obedience to it. At that moment Harper's Ferry was in possession of the rebels; but this fact had not bec
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