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Hempstead, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry democracy-in-new-netherland
ht districts represented, four were Dutch and four English. Of the nineteen delegates, ten were of Dutch and nine were of English nativity. This was the first really representative assembly in the great State of New York chosen by the people. The names of the delegates were as follows: From New Amsterdam, Van Hattem, Kregier, and Van de Grist; from Breucklen (Brooklyn), Lubbertsen, Van der Beeck, and Beeckman; from Flushing, Hicks and Flake; from Newtown, Coe and Hazard; from Heemstede (Hempstead), Washburn and Somers; from Amersfoort (Flatlands), Wolfertsen, Strycker, and Swartwout; from Midwont (Flatbush), Elbertsen and Spicer; and from Gravesend, Baxter and Hubbard. Baxter was at that time the English secretary of the colony, and he led the English delegates. The object of this convention was to form and adopt a remonstrance against the tyrannous rule of the governor. It was drawn by Baxter, signed by all the delegates present, and sent to the governor, with a demand that he
Brooklyn (New York, United States) (search for this): entry democracy-in-new-netherland
onvention, and give legal sanction for the election of delegates thereto. These met in New Amsterdam on Dec. 10, 1653. Of the eight districts represented, four were Dutch and four English. Of the nineteen delegates, ten were of Dutch and nine were of English nativity. This was the first really representative assembly in the great State of New York chosen by the people. The names of the delegates were as follows: From New Amsterdam, Van Hattem, Kregier, and Van de Grist; from Breucklen (Brooklyn), Lubbertsen, Van der Beeck, and Beeckman; from Flushing, Hicks and Flake; from Newtown, Coe and Hazard; from Heemstede (Hempstead), Washburn and Somers; from Amersfoort (Flatlands), Wolfertsen, Strycker, and Swartwout; from Midwont (Flatbush), Elbertsen and Spicer; and from Gravesend, Baxter and Hubbard. Baxter was at that time the English secretary of the colony, and he led the English delegates. The object of this convention was to form and adopt a remonstrance against the tyrannous r
Flushing, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry democracy-in-new-netherland
legates thereto. These met in New Amsterdam on Dec. 10, 1653. Of the eight districts represented, four were Dutch and four English. Of the nineteen delegates, ten were of Dutch and nine were of English nativity. This was the first really representative assembly in the great State of New York chosen by the people. The names of the delegates were as follows: From New Amsterdam, Van Hattem, Kregier, and Van de Grist; from Breucklen (Brooklyn), Lubbertsen, Van der Beeck, and Beeckman; from Flushing, Hicks and Flake; from Newtown, Coe and Hazard; from Heemstede (Hempstead), Washburn and Somers; from Amersfoort (Flatlands), Wolfertsen, Strycker, and Swartwout; from Midwont (Flatbush), Elbertsen and Spicer; and from Gravesend, Baxter and Hubbard. Baxter was at that time the English secretary of the colony, and he led the English delegates. The object of this convention was to form and adopt a remonstrance against the tyrannous rule of the governor. It was drawn by Baxter, signed by a
d their complaints, they would appeal to the States-General. At this the governor took fire, and, seizing his cane, ordered Beeckman to leave his presence. The plucky ambassador coolly folded his arms, and silently defied the magistrate. When Stuyvesant's anger had abated, he asked Beeckman's pardon for his rudeness. He was not so complaisant with the convention. He ordered them to disperse on pain of his high displeasure. The convention executed their threat by sending an advocate to Holland to lay their grievances before the States-General. It has been observed how the first germ of democracy or republicanism appeared in New Amsterdam, and was checked in its visible growth by the heel of power. It grew, nevertheless. It was stimulated by the kind acts of Gov. Thomas Dongan (q. v.); and when the English revolution of 1688 had developed the strength of the people's will, and their just aspirations were formulated in the Bill of Rights, it sprang up into a vigorous fruit-b
s represented, four were Dutch and four English. Of the nineteen delegates, ten were of Dutch and nine were of English nativity. This was the first really representative assembly in the great State of New York chosen by the people. The names of the delegates were as follows: From New Amsterdam, Van Hattem, Kregier, and Van de Grist; from Breucklen (Brooklyn), Lubbertsen, Van der Beeck, and Beeckman; from Flushing, Hicks and Flake; from Newtown, Coe and Hazard; from Heemstede (Hempstead), Washburn and Somers; from Amersfoort (Flatlands), Wolfertsen, Strycker, and Swartwout; from Midwont (Flatbush), Elbertsen and Spicer; and from Gravesend, Baxter and Hubbard. Baxter was at that time the English secretary of the colony, and he led the English delegates. The object of this convention was to form and adopt a remonstrance against the tyrannous rule of the governor. It was drawn by Baxter, signed by all the delegates present, and sent to the governor, with a demand that he should give
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