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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). Search the whole document.

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January 28th (search for this): chapter 6
ommission asking admission into the rebel lines, to visit our poor prisoners in their hands to relieve their spiritual wants; but I believe the Confederate authorities declined. The Richmond papers are very severe on Davis, and there is every indication of discord among them. I hope to Heaven this will incline them to peace, and that there may be some truth in the many reports in the papers that something is going on! General Meade left Headquarters for Philadelphia where he arrived January 28. He left Philadelphia on the 30th. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 1, 1865. I reached City Point at twelve o'clock last night, having had a very comfortable journey via Annapolis. We found a good deal of ice in the Chesapeake Bay and considerable in the James River; but to-day has been so mild and pleasant I think the ice will disappear. From all I can gather, the Secretary's telegram must have been based on something Ord sent to Washington; for Grant did not return
February 21st (search for this): chapter 6
ve ever devoted all the energy of a tender mother's love to check and avert the fatal disease that is carrying off our first born; all that human power could do has been done. Our boy has had warning, and not only his good life, but the consciousness that he knew and was prepared for the change, should sustain us in that parting which had to be encountered one day, for we all must die in time. George will tell you all about me. General Meade left headquarters at 12 o'clock noon, on February 21, for Philadelphia, and arrived there at 10 P. M., on the 23d. Before General Meade had reached his home the newspapers announced the death of his son Sergeant on the 21st instant at 11 P. M. General Meade left Philadelphia at 11 P. M. on the 26th for the army, having been hurriedly sent for by the Secretary of War. War Department, Washington City, 12 M., February 27, 1865. I take advantage of a delay, waiting to see the Secretary, to send you a few lines. I slept nearly all the jou
March 1st (search for this): chapter 6
ield, have been supposed to know something about them; but for that occasion his knowledge was not of the kind sought by the committee. Reference to the journal of the committee, which forms part of its voluminous reports, shows what, at the very outset, General Meade had to contend with. It is there seen that the committee had undertaken an investigation of the campaign and battle of Gettysburg, on February 26, 1864, Major-General Daniel E. Sickles being the first witness examined. On March 1, Major-General Abner Doubleday was examined. On March 3, Brigadier-General Albion P. Howe was examined, the giving of his testimony lasting two days. On March 4, immediately after the conclusion of General Howe's testimony, as it is printed in the journal of the committee, appears the following entry: The chairman directed the stenographer to enter upon the journal, that, having become impressed with the exceeding importance of the testimony taken by the committee, in relation to the Ar
March 3rd (search for this): chapter 6
een that the committee had undertaken an investigation of the campaign and battle of Gettysburg, on February 26, 1864, Major-General Daniel E. Sickles being the first witness examined. On March 1, Major-General Abner Doubleday was examined. On March 3, Brigadier-General Albion P. Howe was examined, the giving of his testimony lasting two days. On March 4, immediately after the conclusion of General Howe's testimony, as it is printed in the journal of the committee, appears the following entryze the enormity of these proceedings it is necessary for the reader to bear in mind the relation of certain dates to each other. The action of Mr. Wade and his colleague is shown by the journal, as just quoted above, to have been taken on the 3d of March, one day before General Howe's testimony was finished, and it was on the following day, the 4th of March, when the entry in the journal, detailing the visit to the President and secretary, had been made by direction of the chairman, he announc
March 4th (search for this): chapter 6
tter of the preceding series, dated March 6, 1864, relates how greatly he was surprised, on his arrival in Washington on March 4, to find the whole town talking of the grave charges that had been made against him before the committee, in connection s examined. On March 3, Brigadier-General Albion P. Howe was examined, the giving of his testimony lasting two days. On March 4, immediately after the conclusion of General Howe's testimony, as it is printed in the journal of the committee, appearsn taken on the 3d of March, one day before General Howe's testimony was finished, and it was on the following day, the 4th of March, when the entry in the journal, detailing the visit to the President and secretary, had been made by direction of the Meade happened to be in Washington, and the committee thereupon summoned General Meade to appear before it. On the 4th of March, therefore, General Meade was summoned to appear before the committee, and on the next day, the 5th of March, he appea
March 5th (search for this): chapter 6
f March, one day before General Howe's testimony was finished, and it was on the following day, the 4th of March, when the entry in the journal, detailing the visit to the President and secretary, had been made by direction of the chairman, he announced that General Meade happened to be in Washington, and the committee thereupon summoned General Meade to appear before it. On the 4th of March, therefore, General Meade was summoned to appear before the committee, and on the next day, the 5th of March, he appeared before it, as mentioned in his letter of the 6th of March. He there says, in that letter of the 6th of March, that upon presenting himself, in obedience to the summons of the committee, he found present only Senator Wade, who denied that there were any charges against him, saying that the committee was merely making up a history of the war, and was now taking evidence to enable it to give an account of the battle of Gettysburg. Yet this gentleman who spoke was he who, with
March 6th (search for this): chapter 6
thereupon summoned General Meade to appear before it. On the 4th of March, therefore, General Meade was summoned to appear before the committee, and on the next day, the 5th of March, he appeared before it, as mentioned in his letter of the 6th of March. He there says, in that letter of the 6th of March, that upon presenting himself, in obedience to the summons of the committee, he found present only Senator Wade, who denied that there were any charges against him, saying that the committee 6th of March, that upon presenting himself, in obedience to the summons of the committee, he found present only Senator Wade, who denied that there were any charges against him, saying that the committee was merely making up a history of the war, and was now taking evidence to enable it to give an account of the battle of Gettysburg. Yet this gentleman who spoke was he who, with his colleague, had only three days before been to see the President and secretary, to request the removal for incompetency of General Meade from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and who, only two days before, had ordered the entry, as quoted, made in the journal immediately before he, as chairman, notified the co
ot what it was when we first crossed the Rapidan. On the 18th I assaulted several times the enemy's positions, deliberately, and with the expectation of carrying them, because I had positive information the enemy had not occupied them more than twelve hours, and that no digging had been done on the lines prior to their occupation. Nevertheless, I failed, and met with serious loss, principally owing to the moral condition of the army; for I am satisfied, had these assaults been made on the 5th and 6th of May, we should have succeeded with half the loss we met. Another inconvenience we suffer from is in the loss of superior and other officers. Hancock's Corps has lost twenty brigade commanders, and the rest of the army is similarly situated. We cannot replace the officers lost with experienced men, and there is no time for reorganization or careful selection. At the same time you must remember the enemy labors under like disadvantages. I conversed with some prisoners yesterda
was when we first crossed the Rapidan. On the 18th I assaulted several times the enemy's positions, deliberately, and with the expectation of carrying them, because I had positive information the enemy had not occupied them more than twelve hours, and that no digging had been done on the lines prior to their occupation. Nevertheless, I failed, and met with serious loss, principally owing to the moral condition of the army; for I am satisfied, had these assaults been made on the 5th and 6th of May, we should have succeeded with half the loss we met. Another inconvenience we suffer from is in the loss of superior and other officers. Hancock's Corps has lost twenty brigade commanders, and the rest of the army is similarly situated. We cannot replace the officers lost with experienced men, and there is no time for reorganization or careful selection. At the same time you must remember the enemy labors under like disadvantages. I conversed with some prisoners yesterday, who said
forefathers—if true to ourselves—victory, under God's blessing, must and will attend our efforts. The advance which was about to be made is known as the Virginia Campaign of 1864 It consisted of stubborn, continuous fighting, with frightful losses. of 127,471 men (O. R.). The Army of Northern Virginia had an aggregate of about 80,000 men. Geo. G. Meade, Major General Commanding. Official: Assistant Adjutant-General. To Mrs. George G. Meade: battle-field, Spottyslvania Court House, May 11—9 A. M. I have only time to tell you we are all safe—that is, George Son of General Meade. and myself—and as far as I know, all your friends, except General Wadsworth, who fell into the hands of the enemy, mortally wounded, without hopes of life. We have been fighting continuously for six days, and have gotten, I think, decidedly the better of the enemy, tough their resistance is most stubborn. Return thanks to the Almighty for the gracious protection extended to us, and let
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