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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). Search the whole document.

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At Mrs. Garnett's I saw Mrs. Tully Wise, who was all last summer in Columbia, South Carolina, and there met Mrs. Alfred Huger with Mariamne's Sister of Mrs. Meade and wife of Thomas B. Huger, C. S. A. children. She says the children are all sweet, and that Mr. and Mrs. Huger are devoted to them, but that Mr. Huger has lost everything, and is now very poor, that he is old and infirm, and will not probably live long. She says Mr. Huger's house in Charleston was burned in the great fire of 1862, and everything in it destroyed, all the old pictures, and all the clothes, jewels and everything belonging to Mariamne's children. Mr. Huger at this time was Postmaster of Charleston, and used to come up and spend Sundays at Columbia. Mrs. Wise had not heard from them since Sherman's occupation. I have already written you that I expect to be in Washington by the 18th inst. It is generally believed that after the army is assembled in Washington it will be disbanded. In that case I shall
April, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 6
dred and twenty thousand? Of these only about sixty thousand were sent to the field, and the share of my army, one of the largest in the field, was not over fifteen thousand; and of this number the greater part were worthless foreigners, who are daily deserting to the enemy. These are sad facts. I remember you were struck last winter with my telling the Councils of Philadelphia that this army, of whose fighting qualities there seemed to be a doubt, had lost, from official records, from April, 1862, to December, 1863, one hundred thousand, killed and wounded. I have now an official document before me in manuscript, being my report of the campaign from the Rapidan to the 1st of November, and it has a list of casualties showing the enormous number of ninety thousand men, killed, wounded and missing. All this is strictly confidential, as I would be condemned for telling the truth; but when people talk to me of ending the war, I must tell them what war is and its requirements; because
Part 6. civil War letters, 1863-1865 To Mrs. George G. Meade: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Frederick, July 8, 1863. I arrived here yesterday; the army is assembling at Middletown. I think we shall have another battle before Lee can cross the river, though from all accounts he is making great efforts to do so. For my part, as I have to follow and fight him, I would rather do it at once and in Maryland than to follow into Virginia. I received last evening your letters of the 3d and 5th inst., and am truly rejoiced that you are treated with such distinction on account of my humble services. I see also that the papers are making a great deal too much fuss about me. I claim no extraordinary merit for this last battle, and would prefer waiting a little while to see what my career is to be before making any pretensions. I did and shall continue to do my duty to the best of my abilities, but knowing as I do that battles are often decided by accidents, and that no man of
March, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
talking of the grave charges that had been made against him before the committee, in connection with the battle of Gettysburg. This was the first intimation he had that the committee was even examining into the Gettysburg campaign, let alone that any charges had been made against him. He further relates in the letter, that on the next day he had been summoned to appear, and on the following day had appeared, before the committee. This was his first experience of the committee, save in March, 1863, when he had given his brief testimony relating to the battle of Fredericksburg. On the occasion of the committee's examination of witnesses in relation to the campaign and battle of Chancellorsville, much to his gratification he had not been summoned, though it would appear from the published testimony that he played quite a conspicuous part in them, and might reasonably, from his position on the field, have been supposed to know something about them; but for that occasion his knowledge
June 28th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
his place in the Senate Chamber, but he was by a happy chance there in Washington, to confound his enemies and bring their machinations to naught. With that readiness of resource, and capacity of concentration, that characterized him, he was equal to the occasion so unexpectedly forced upon him. Thus was General Meade suddenly called upon, as much to his surprise, and as much without preparation, as when he was put in command of the Army of the Potomac, at Frederick, Maryland, on the 28th of June, 1863, to prepare to fight what he afterward terms his second battle of Gettysburg. Without the slightest preparation, without notes, memoranda, reports, or data of any kind, with which to refresh his memory, and with a mind preoccupied with other important and serious subjects, he gave his testimony before the committee. Here the case may well rest, the evidence, irrefutable and conclusive, having been submitted. It may, however, in conclusion, be of interest to consider what may also
July 8th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
Part 6. civil War letters, 1863-1865 To Mrs. George G. Meade: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Frederick, July 8, 1863. I arrived here yesterday; the army is assembling at Middletown. I think we shall have another battle before Lee can cross the river, though from all accounts he is making great efforts to do so. For my part, as I have to follow and fight him, I would rather do it at once and in Maryland than to follow into Virginia. I received last evening your letters of the 3d and 5th inst., and am truly rejoiced that you are treated with such distinction on account of my humble services. I see also that the papers are making a great deal too much fuss about me. I claim no extraordinary merit for this last battle, and would prefer waiting a little while to see what my career is to be before making any pretensions. I did and shall continue to do my duty to the best of my abilities, but knowing as I do that battles are often decided by accidents, and that no man of
July 10th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ocument mentioned, see Appendix A. received yesterday afternoon. It will give you pleasure I know. Preserve it, because the terms in which the General in Chief speaks of the battle are stronger than any I have deemed it proper to use myself. I never claimed a victory, though I stated that Lee was defeated in his efforts to destroy my army. I am going to move as soon as I can get the army supplied with subsistence and ammunition. Headquarters army of the Potomac, South Mountain Pass, July 10, 1863. I have been so busy I could not write. You must depend on George Son of General Meade. for letters. Lee has not crossed and does not intend to cross the river, and I expect in a few days, if not sooner, again to hazard the fortune of war. I know so well that this is a fortune and that accidents, etc., turn the tide of victory, that, until the question is settled, I cannot but be very anxious. If it should please God again to give success to our efforts, then I could be more t
July 14th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
and I thought it would make you easy to know we were well. George, Son of General Meade. I suppose, has written you what a narrow escape he had. I never knew of it till last night. His horse was struck with a piece of shell, killing him, and coming so near George as to carry away a part of the back of his saddle. This was on the 3d, just after we had repulsed the last assault, when I rode up to the front, and George was the only officer with me. Headquarters army of the Potomac, July 14, 1863. I found Lee in a very strong position, intrenched. I hesitated to attack him, without some examination of the mode of approaching him. I called my corps commanders together, and they voted against attacking him. This morning, when I advanced to feel his position and seek for a weak point, I found he had retired in the night and was nearly across the river. I immediately started in pursuit, and my cavalry captured two thousand prisoners, two guns, several flags, and killed General
July 16th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
, but only to spur me on to an active pursuit, and that it was not deemed sufficient cause for relieving me. For telegram mentioned, see Appendix C. This is exactly what I expected; unless I did impracticable things, fault would be found with me. I have ignored the senseless adulation of the public and press, and I am now just as indifferent to the censure bestowed without just cause. I start to-morrow to run another race with Lee. Headquarters army of the Potomac, Berlin, Md., July 16, 1863. I wrote to you of the censure put on me by the President, through General Halleck, because I did not bag General Lee, and of the course I took on it. I don't know whether I informed you of Halleck's reply, that his telegram was not intended as a censure, but merely to spur me on to an active pursuit, which I consider more offensive than the original message; for no man who does his duty, and all that he can do, as I maintain I have done, needs spurring. It is only the laggards and t
July 18th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
This has been the history of all my predecessors, and I clearly saw that in time their fate would be mine. This was the reason I was disinclined to take the command, and it is for this reason I would gladly give it up. I consider the New York riots very formidable and significant. I have always expected the crisis of this revolution to turn on the attempt to execute the conscription act, and at present things look very unfavorable. Headquarters army of the Potomac, Berlin, Md., July 18, 1863. I try to send you a few lines every chance I can get, but I find it very difficult to remember when I have written. I don't think I told you that on my way here, three days ago, I stopped and called on Mrs. Lee (Miss Carroll that was), who lives about six miles from this place. Mrs. Lee received me with great cordiality, insisted on my dining with her and daughter, which I did, and had a very nice time, it being quite refreshing to be once more in the presence of ladies, surrounde
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