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on Black Island, to flank the crossing of Light-house Inlet. The battery at Vincent's Creek was to have two or three guns of long range. A communication from James to Morris Island was also ordered. To the 3d Question I would state, that these operations being under the Engineer Department, and in no way under my charge, I can only give my opinions. Some reasons why they were not completed were alluded to in my correspondence with the Headquarters of the Department of the 24th of May, 6th and 14th of June, and subsequently; but the prominent difficulties, as declared, was the want of labor and transportation. After the failure of the attack by ironclads on the 7th of April, and they had retired, the works could have been armed with a certain class of guns taken from the closed casemates of Fort Sumter. Difficulties would have occurred with the carriages and ordnance stores. These guns, however, would not have answered for what was required for the armament at the south en
leave immediately after being relieved from the lines. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. near Chester, Va., June 3d, 1864:10 P. M. Genl. R. E. Lee: Ransom's brigade will leave here to-night for Bottom's Bridge, crossing at Drury's Bluff. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. near Chester, Va., June 4th, 1864:4 A. M. Genl. B. Bragg, Richmond: I have ordered Ransom's brigade to move at daylight, if no hostile demonstration is made during the night. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Swift Creek, June 8th, 1864:10 P. M. Genl. B. Bragg, Richmond, Va.: All quiet in our front to-day. Pickets on lower part James River report one steamer, towing up canal-boats and pontoons, with pontoniers; also steamers and schooners going up, heavily loaded; whereas those going down are light. This may indicate future operations of Grant. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Richmond, June 9th, 1864. To Genl. Beauregard: 11. Telegrams received and submitted. Will answer you soon. Telegraph also to General
General Bragg telegraphs that since the enemy has been repulsed at Petersburg the movement for Gracie's brigade had been suspended. It is, however, held in readiness to move from Chaffin's Bluff. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Swift Creek, June 9th, 1864:1.30 P. M. Brig.-Genl. Wise, Petersburg: I cannot furnish you at present with reinforcements. Defend the place to the last, and, if compelled, retire, fighting, in the direction of Swift Creek Bridge. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Gaines's Mill, via Mechanicsville road, June 9th, 1864:2.30 P. M. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Your telegrams of 9.30 and 10.15 A. M. to-day to General Bragg received. No troops have left General Grant's army to my knowledge, and none could have crossed James River without being perceived. I think it very improbable, under present circumstances, that Grant would diminish his force. Stanton's despatches state that all available troops have been drawn from Butler except sufficient to hold his li
ct the safety of your forces or obstruct your operations, either present or future; and, finally, the owners of which were men not even bearing arms in this war. A day or two later another expedition burned about two-thirds of the village of Bluffton, a summer resort of the planters of the sea-coast of South Carolina, an undefended and indefensible place. The best houses were selected for destruction, and for the act no possible provocation may be truthfully alleged. Later yet—the 11th of June—the village of Darien, in the State of Georgia, was laid waste by your soldiers, and every building in it burned to the ground, except one church and three small houses; there, as at Bluffton, no defence having been made or any act of provocation previously committed, either by the owners of the desolated place, or by the soldiers of the Confederate States, there or in any part of this Department. Again, as far back as the last of March, when evacuating Jacksonville, in East Florida, y
being under the Engineer Department, and in no way under my charge, I can only give my opinions. Some reasons why they were not completed were alluded to in my correspondence with the Headquarters of the Department of the 24th of May, 6th and 14th of June, and subsequently; but the prominent difficulties, as declared, was the want of labor and transportation. After the failure of the attack by ironclads on the 7th of April, and they had retired, the works could have been armed with a certaine immediate defence of Petersburg (about 2200 of all arms) consisted of Wise's brigade, some artillery, two regiments of Dearing's cavalry, and a few militia. During the night of the 14th I received from you the following despatch: Richmond, June 14th, 1864:9.10 P. M. Genl. Beauregard: General Lee reports Grant has abandoned his depot on the York, and moved to James River, he supposes about McClellan's old base, at Harrison's Landing. Lee is on a line from Malvern Hill to White Oak Swamp
ode. The casualties in Wise's brigade, on June 15th, amounted to 12 killed, 62 wounded, and 129 Bermuda Hundreds line. 1. Swift Creek, Va., June 15th, 1864:1 P. M. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmond,T. Beauregard, Genl. 3. Petersburg, Va., June 15th, 1864:9.11 P. M. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmoto General R. E. Lee. 4. Petersburg, Va., June 15th, 1864:11.15 P. M. Genl. R. E. Lee, Headquartnd Bragg. (telegram repeated.) Swift Creek, June 15th, 1864:9 A. M. General Dearing reports at the following despatch: Swift Creek, Va., June 15th, 1864:7 A. M. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmond,ng telegraphic despatch: Swift Creek, Va., June 15th, 1864:1 P. M. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmond,I telegraphed you as follows: Swift Creek, June 15th, 1864:1.45 P. M. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmoing telegraphic despatch: Petersburg, Va., June 15th, 1864:9.11 P. M. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Richmo Giles B. Cooke during the late War. Wednesday, June 15th, 1864.—About 12.30 P. M. was sent into [2 more...]
. G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Telegram. Headquarters, Petersburg, June 16th, 1864:7.45 A. M. Genl. R. E. Lee, Headquarters, Army No. Va., Ridon. E. C. Goodwin, Sergt. Sig. Post. Telegram. Drury's Bluff, June 16th, 1864:7.45 A. M. To Genl. Beauregard: Four (4) monitors, four near to the buoys. G. H. Terrett, Major Comdg. Drury's Bluff, June 16th, 1864:4 P. M. Genl. Beauregard: The transports you mention havrant been seen crossing James River? R. E. Lee. Drury's Bluff, June 16th, 1864:1.15 P. M. Genl. Beauregard: Despatch of 11.30 just recehnson's and Hoke's divisions, and in moving Headquarters. Thursday, June 16th.—Left Colonel Roman for the front about 5 A. M. Breakfasted and mainly from batteries near the Baxter road, where since the 16th of June the enemy seemed to be building, batteries and strong works. pated actively in battles of Wanbottom Church and Petersburg, on the 16th and 17th of June last. I respectfully recommend him for promotion a
Respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. M. Otey, A. A. G. Petersburg, June 17th, 1864:5 P. M. Genl. R. E. Lee, Chester, Va.: Prisoners just taken represenked into the city about 7.30 P. M., and went to Mrs. Paul's to supper. Friday, June 17th.—Arose about 7 A. M. and breakfasted. Rode to the headquarters of Generarals Hoke, Wise, and Bushrod Johnson, during that eventful Friday night, the 17th of June. During those three memorable days, in the capacity of your aid, I receivis point—you received a telegram couched in these terms: Drury's Bluff, Friday, June 17th: P. M. [Or, Saturday, June 18th: A. M.] Geul. Beauregard: Am not yet scal Inspector, C. S. A. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. clay's House, June 17th, 1864:1.45 P. M. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Petersburg, Va.: Fifth Corps (Warated actively in battles of Wanbottom Church and Petersburg, on the 16th and 17th of June last. I respectfully recommend him for promotion at the earliest opportunit
from here. G. T. Beauregard. Headquarters, Petersburg, June 18th, 1864:12.30 A. M. Genl. R. E. Lee, Clay's House: Enemyot yet ascertained. G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Petersburg, June 18th, 1864:12.40 A. M. Genl. R. E. Lee, Clay's House: All q Headquarters, Department N. C. and So. Va., Petersburg, June 18th, 1864:2.20 A. M. Major-Genl. J. B. Kershaw, Comdg. Divisiy, A. A. G. Headquarters, Department N. C. and so. Va., June 18th, 1864:2.20 A. M. Major-Genl. R. F. Hoke, Comdg. Division: I was back at Headquarters early on the morning of the 18th of June, as you may remember, having taken no rest at all, and patches that were captured from a Yankee courier. Saturday, June 18th.—General Beauregard sent me at 1 A. M. to General Leerms: Drury's Bluff, Friday, June 17th: P. M. [Or, Saturday, June 18th: A. M.] Geul. Beauregard: Am not yet satisfied asy for your remarkable repulse of Grant on the 17th and 18th of June, when your hundreds repelled his thousands, I remain, w
ty, God Almighty did save it. General Lee, with the high-minded, soldierly, as well as gentlemanly motives which ever characterized his acts, was no doubt impressed with the importance as well as the insistance of your different messages; and though, perhaps, still relying on the reports of his scouts, he nevertheless issued orders in compliance with your most urgent request. The fact is that Kershaw's division was already on the move before I had time to reach Petersburg, and on the 19th of June (I think it was a Sunday), before night, all, or nearly all, of General Lee's army was at Petersburg or its immediate vicinity, where also, and at the same time, was all, or nearly all, of General Grant's army. Your advice was to attack the very next day (19th), but General Lee was unwilling to issue the necessary orders to that effect, on account of the heavy marching his men had just gone through; and when, a few days afterwards, we did attack, the enemy, with the facilities he alway
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