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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

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January 3rd (search for this): chapter 26
to recent events in Tennessee. There are no advices whatever from that quarter, and I do not understand General Lee's telegraph. Am apprehensive that some reverse may have occurred. Geo. Wm. Brent, Col., and A. A. G. Telegram. Richmond, Va., Jan. 2d, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Yours of 31st December received. If you find it necessary to make the change suggested, you are authorized to employ General Taylor as proposed. Jeffn. Davis. Telegram. Augusta, Ga., Jan. 3d, 1865:9 P. M. I have selected a defensive line behind Brier Creek in Georgia to connect with Salkehatchie line; have ordered General Smith to have it reconnoitred and report to you. I leave in morning. G. T. Beauregard. Lieut.-Genl. W. J. Hardee, Charleston, S. C. Telegram. Corinth, Miss., Jan. 3d, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Your telegrams of the 27th and 28th from Charleston and Montgomery received. Steps are being taken to execute your orders therein contained, bu
January 7th (search for this): chapter 26
Beauregard, Comdg., etc. Telegram. Richmond, Va., Jan. 7th., 1865. To Genl. Beauregard: Hardee needs aid. If Hood has not complied with your suggestion, please give the matter prompt attention. Jeffn. Davis. Macon, Ga., Jan. 7th, 1865:11 A. M. To Genl. S. Cooper, Adjt.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: General Hood reports from Corinth, Miss., January 3d, 1865, that the army recrossed Tennessee River at Bainbridge without material loss since battle of Franklin, and that it willve for military operations, and that it absolutely requires rest. He deems it of vital importance that the Trans-Mississippi troops should be furloughed by organizations for one hundred days. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Macon, Ga., Jan. 7th, 1865:9 A. M. To Col. Geo. Wm. Brent, A. A. G., Montgomery, Ala.: I leave this evening. Order General Hood in writing to make report of his operations from Tuscumbia to Nashville, and back to Tupelo. I have telegraphed him to same effect.
January 14th (search for this): chapter 26
Beauregard. Headquarteris, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., March 25th, 1864. To General Samuel Cooper, Adjt. and Insp.-Genl., C. S. A., Richmond, Va.: General,—In transmitting detailed reports of recent operations in East Florida I have to accompany them, for the information of the War Department, with the following. The officer in observation at Foot Point of the enemy's fleet in the waters of Port Royal and Broad River having reported, on the afternoon of the 14th of January, that some thirty-five vessels, including an ironclad from Hilton Head, had gone to sea in the fog the day before, and probably with troops, as it was observed to be more quiet on the adjacent islands (less drumming and firing of small-arms) than usual, I gave Major-General Gilmer, at Savannah, immediate notification of the fact, with instructions to keep strict watch in the direction of Warsaw Sound and the Ossabaw. At the same time orders were given to the proper staff-officers to ho
January 16th (search for this): chapter 26
quiet on the adjacent islands (less drumming and firing of small-arms) than usual, I gave Major-General Gilmer, at Savannah, immediate notification of the fact, with instructions to keep strict watch in the direction of Warsaw Sound and the Ossabaw. At the same time orders were given to the proper staff-officers to hold means of transportation by rail in readiness on the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. An increase of the tents of the enemy on Tybee Island was also reported. On the 16th of January I repaired in person to Savannah, in which quarter I apprehended some operations might be looked for. I remained in the District of Georgia, inspecting the troops and works, until the 3d of February, when, there being no indication of any movement of the enemy in that direction, I returned to Charleston, leaving with Major-General Gilmer orders to hold the 64th Georgia Volunteers, the 1st Florida battalion, and a light battery in readiness to be sent to Florida at short notice. * * *
rris and W. H. Echols, Provisional Engineer Corps. The accumulation of the enemy's troops, transports, and ironclad vessels at Port Royal during the months of February and March, and subsequently in the North Edisto and Stono rivers, having convinced me that the long-threatened attack on Charleston was immediately impending, evd, after trial, that this does not work, take one-fourth, irrespective of former contributions, except from those who voluntarily furnished labor at my call last February and March. Working on railroads cannot be taken as ground of exemption. Negroes found in your district—refugees—of course must fare the same with others. not in this way become a part of the currency or tend to depreciate it. What Mr. Memminger says about the short time from the formation of the Confederacy in February and May, when the blockade was declared, is equally without point or force; it is well known that the blockade so-called, during the summer and fall of 1861, and
February 3rd (search for this): chapter 26
h in the direction of Warsaw Sound and the Ossabaw. At the same time orders were given to the proper staff-officers to hold means of transportation by rail in readiness on the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. An increase of the tents of the enemy on Tybee Island was also reported. On the 16th of January I repaired in person to Savannah, in which quarter I apprehended some operations might be looked for. I remained in the District of Georgia, inspecting the troops and works, until the 3d of February, when, there being no indication of any movement of the enemy in that direction, I returned to Charleston, leaving with Major-General Gilmer orders to hold the 64th Georgia Volunteers, the 1st Florida battalion, and a light battery in readiness to be sent to Florida at short notice. * * * General D. H. Hill having arrived at these Headquarters on the 28th ultimo, I left for Florida the same evening, although that officer was unwilling, for personal reasons, to assume the duty at once
February 4th (search for this): chapter 26
Richmond, Va., Feb. 4th, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Augusta, Ga.: * * * You will assume command of all the forces in the district as defined before your departure to the west, and should you deem it advisable will direct General Hardee to resume the command of his old corps when it arrives, and add to it any other forces which may be advantageously associated with it. * * * Jefferson Davis. Official. Geo. Wm. Brent, Col., and A. A. G. Telegram. Carter's Ford, Feb. 4th, 1865:11 P. M. Genl. Beauregard: The enemy crossed the Salkehatchie between Broxton and River's bridges; also above River's bridge, compelling me to fall back upon Branchville. It was with difficulty that my command could be withdrawn, as I was completely flanked on both sides. The fighting at River's bridge was quite sharp, and lasted several hours. L. Mclaws, Major-Genl. Telegram. Augusta, Feb. 5th, 1865. To Gov. Jos. Brown, Macon, Ga.: The crisis is again upon your
February 6th (search for this): chapter 26
who will return an absentee to the army. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Augusta, Feb. 6th, 1865. To Commanding Officer, Columbia, S. C.: It is still uncertain whether enemy, after reaching Branchville, will move on Augusta, Columbia, or Charleston. He may move on two last at once, without our being able to check him long. Make, accordingly, all necessary preparations. Communicate this to Governor Magrath and General Winder. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Grahams, Feb. 6th, 1865:11.50 P. M. Genl. Beauregard: Enemy will certainly take possession of railroad to-morrow, and I shall get between him and Augusta. I have sent one brigade to reinforce Colonel Crews, who is now between enemy and Augusta; should he move towards Columbia I will cross bridge above and get in his front. I have ordered all bridges below Holman's bridge destroyed. J. Wheeler, Major-Genl. Telegram. Charleston, S. C., Feb. 7th, 1865. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: If your h
February 7th (search for this): chapter 26
, Lieutenant Dixon, of Alabama, commanding. There is little hope of safety for that brave man and his associates, however, as they were not captured. G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. Report of General Joseph Finegan. Headquarters, District East Florida. In the field, twelve miles from Jacksonville, Feb. 26th, 1864. Brig.-Genl. Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff, Charleston, S. C.: General,—For the information of the Commanding General I have the honor to report that on the evening of the 7th February the enemy landed at Jacksonville, from eighteen transports and gunboats, a large force of cavalry, artillery, and infantry, which was largely augmented by arrivals on the 8th instant. On the receipt of this intelligence I immediately notified Lieutenant-Colonel McCormick, commanding an effective force of near 350 men of all arms at Camp Finegan, to guard against a surprise, advising him that I would join the command as soon as I had issued the necessary orders for collecting my widely
February 11th (search for this): chapter 26
Portion of Florida east of Suwanee River. note.—1st, 5th, 6th, and 7th Mil. Dists., S. C., comprise the defences of Charleston, S. C., and formed the 1st Mil. Dist., S. C., until the 22d day of October, 1863. Telegram. Charleston, S. C., Feb. 11th, 1864:8.30 A. M. Genl. Samuel Cooper, Adjt. and Insp.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: Governor Milton telegraphs following: Enemy's force at least five thousand strong; not force enough in State to prevent his passing through it. Colonel McLellan, Wesional troops. Have sent Governor Milton all I can spare without risking loss of Charleston or Savannah. Cannot two brigades be ordered from Northwestern Georgia or North Carolina temporarily? G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Charleston, S. C., Feb. 11th, 1864:2 P. M. Genl. Samuel Cooper, Adjt. and Insp.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: General Finegan reports enemy about to attack him near Lake City. Rapidity of movement indicates Tallahassee as the objective point—probably to form junction with forc
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