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Tom Parsons (search for this): chapter 12
ord was passed along to fall back quietly to our skirmish line and back we started. Getting back into the open field, it was covered with dark forms lying on the ground, and many more moving back. I came at once across a group and recognized Tom Parsons of the 5th Maine. He was shot through the wrist, both bones were crushed and he suffered terrible pain. Between him and another man was a wounded captain and Parsons said For God's sake help us back with him. Giving the man my gun, I stoopeParsons said For God's sake help us back with him. Giving the man my gun, I stooped in front of the captain, and catching him by the legs hoisted him as gently as I could upon my back, carried him to the edge of the woods, and under shelter of our skirmish line, and there left him with some of his regiment. I kept on trying to find some of our own fellows. Reaching the works we started from, I found one of the company. Back of the works a little ways, in the edge of the pines where our men were assembling was the 95th Pennsylvania. Occupying these works less than an ho
David A. Russell (search for this): chapter 12
n open field, about two hundred yards from a piece of woods. A wood road led from my position directly to the point of attack. The ground was looked over by General Russell and myself, and regimental commanders were also required to see it, that they might understand the work before them. The column of attack consisted of twelveon the left. Night had arrived, our position was three-quarters of a mile in advance of the army, and without prospect of support was untenable. Meeting General Russell at the edge of the wood, he gave me the order to withdraw. I wrote the order and sent it along the line by Captain Gordon of the 121st N. Y., in accordance w drive out the enemy in his front. With this order and understanding General Wright rode away to make the necessary arrangements for the attack. He selected General Russell to take general charge of the entire movement, and at his chief of staff's suggestion chose Emory Upton, then colonel of the 121st New York Volunteer Infantry
John Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 12
out adequate results. In but a week's time, since leaving our pleasant camp on Hazel River, pitiless war had destroyed our bravest and best men. The loss of General Sedgwick had been keenly felt. He had ever been a source of pride to us and his calm courage and masterly military skill was an anchor of hope, and an abiding confidence in our ability to whip the foe! (Here it may be well to tell what the writer knows of the death of General Sedgwick. His brother was on the skirmish line and within a few feet of the general when he was shot, and heard his last words. The sharpshooters of the enemy were firing at the battery, when General Sedgwick came up aGeneral Sedgwick came up as he passed the battery he said: Don't dodge, men. They couldn't hit an ox at this distance. He stepped forward a few paces, raised his glasses to look and immediately received the fatal shot that ended his brilliant military career, to the loss and sorrow of the men who had served under him.) Colonel Beckwith continues his narr
Hazel River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ong time. On the morning of the 11th we mustered barely a hundred men. Captain Gordon I think was in command of the regiment. We changed our position a little on the 11th and as we glanced along the terribly thinned ranks and upon the shattered staff and tattered colors, we were filled with sorrow for our lost comrades, and deep forebodings for the future. A splendid regiment had been nearly destroyed without adequate results. In but a week's time, since leaving our pleasant camp on Hazel River, pitiless war had destroyed our bravest and best men. The loss of General Sedgwick had been keenly felt. He had ever been a source of pride to us and his calm courage and masterly military skill was an anchor of hope, and an abiding confidence in our ability to whip the foe! (Here it may be well to tell what the writer knows of the death of General Sedgwick. His brother was on the skirmish line and within a few feet of the general when he was shot, and heard his last words. The sharpsh
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ave resulted in the utter rout of Lee's army. The account of this sanguinary assault is best begun by quoting Colonel Upton's official report of it: The point of attack was at an angle near the Scott House, about half a mile from the Spottsylvania road. The enemy's entrenchments were of formidable character, with abatis in front, and surmounted by heavy logs, underneath which were loopholes for musketry. In the re-entrant to the right was a battery, with traverses between the guns. horough knowledge of the situation, and what was best to do, as did Colonel Upton. Since the war I have had the pleasure on many occasions of meeting the gallant soldier, who was chief of General Wright's staff at the time of this assault at Spottsylvania under General Upton; and the following account of the inception, organization and execution of the battle is from his own lips. It was told me by him recently in answer to some inquiries I had been making of him, why the assaulting column wa
kirmish line, which a little while before had driven, by a determined advance, the enemy's skirmishers into their works. Riding back to General Wright I met Colonel Tompkins, chief of the Corps' artillery, and the general instructed him to continue the fire of the batteries till 5 o'clock, which would give Colonel Upton ample time made. As it became evident that we could not wait longer for them, and orders coming from headquarters to send Upton in, I rode out by prearrangement with Colonel Tompkins, and at a point where I could see him and Colonel Upton, I took out my handkerchief and waved it. Both Upton and Tompkins answered my signal, and rode-one toTompkins answered my signal, and rode-one to his batteries and stopped their firing, the other to the head of his column to set it in motion-and in a very little time the crash of the Rebel volleys and the cheers of our men told that the work was under way, and immediately the swarms of Rebels from the captured works rushing to our lines under a heavy fire, told that Upton
William H. Tucker (search for this): chapter 12
perfect confidence, fought with unflinching courage, and retired only on receipt of a written order, after having expended the ammunition of their dead and wounded comrades. In this engagement the 121st had one officer and thirty-two men killed and a large number wounded. Captain Butts was wounded in the advance upon the works, and while being assisted to the rear was again hit and instantly killed. Major Galpin, Captains Kidder, Jackson and Cronkite and Lieutenants Foote, Johnson and Tucker were wounded. Lieutenant Foote was wounded while trying to turn the guns of the battery just captured upon the enemy. He fell into the hands of the enemy, and was for a long time supposed to have been killed. Lieut. Jas. W. Johnston, on mounting the parapet, had a bayonet thrust through one of his thighs when raising his sword to strike down the Confederate who had thrust the bayonet through him. The Rebel begged for mercy, was spared, and sent to the rear a prisoner. The reason given
Emory Upton (search for this): chapter 12
he ordered his chief of staff to send for Colonel Upton to report to him early in the morning for selected handed it to Colonel Upton, and said, Upton what do you think of that for a command? Colom, and orders coming from headquarters to send Upton in, I rode out by prearrangement with Colonel , and at a point where I could see him and Colonel Upton, I took out my handkerchief and waved it. y galloped to General Wright and reported that Upton had got through and taken a large number of priled at other points, you had better withdraw Upton, and the order was given to him to withdraw higle and losses, without compensating results. Upton's formation, arrangement and conduct of the asnd said to him, General, you remember when Colonel Upton was selected to lead the charge it was theade out and signed. In the morning when I saw Upton, I said, Upton, you remember when I told you tUpton, you remember when I told you that you were assigned to lead the charge, and if you succeeded you were to have your stars, and if [18 more...]
Henry Upton (search for this): chapter 12
ty for failure Colonel Olcott wounded and captured Upton's promotion to Brig. General. the Bloody angle Fthis sanguinary assault is best begun by quoting Colonel Upton's official report of it: The point of attare on the qui vive. As soon as we were formed Colonel Upton, Major Galpin and the Adjutant came along and shght, advance and fire lengthwise of their line. Colonel Upton was with our regiment and rode on our right. He and the battery fired one charge of cannister. Colonel Upton shouted Forward and we all ran towards the batten shot to pieces by the fire from both sides. Colonel Upton asked for volunteers to make a rush on the Rebelonsolidated into a battalion of four companies. Colonel Upton had been made a brigadier general upon the fieldf the situation, and what was best to do, as did Colonel Upton. Since the war I have had the pleasure on many the time of this assault at Spottsylvania under General Upton; and the following account of the inception, org
Johnny Woodward (search for this): chapter 12
Continuing we ran over the battery taking it and its men prisoners, and on beyond, until there was nothing in our front, except some tents by the roadside and there was no firing upon us for a few moments, of any magnitude. I looked into the ammunition chest of the battery to see if I could find something to put in the vents of the guns to prevent their being fired again in case we had to leave them. There were several of our company there. I remember Jesse Jones and Dorr Davenport, Johnny Woodward, Judson A. Chapin and I think they took the wheels off one of the guns, and I broke off a twig in the vents of two guns, but we were ordered to go to the works and moved to the right. While moving as ordered, some Rebel troops came up and fired a volley into us. We got on the other side of the rifle pits and began firing at them and checked their advance. It was now duskish and it seemed as though the firing on our front and to our right became heavier, and the whistle of balls seemed
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