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Virginians (search for this): chapter 10
ice in the Government to the implacably hostile, but he would look to the removal of all proscription at the earliest possible moment. He closed thus: Men of Virginia: I entreat you to forget the years of slavery and secession and civil war, now happily passed, in the hopeful contemplation of better days of freedom and union and peace now opening before you. Forget that some of you have been masters, others slaves — some for disunion, others against it-and remember only that you are Virginians, and all now and henceforth freemen. Bear in mind that your State is the heart of a great republic, not the frontier of a weaker Confederacy, and that your unequaled combination of soil, timber, minerals, and water-power fairly entitles you to a population of five millions before the close of this century. Consider that the natural highway of empire — the shortest and easiest route from the Atlantic to the heart of the great valley-lies up the James River and down the Kanawha, and that t
Vanderbilt (search for this): chapter 10
sonable and proper assurances are given that disloyalty has ceased to be powerful and dangerous in the Southern States. When Jefferson Davis's counsel, George Shea, an old friend of Greeley, consulted the latter about procuring satisfactory bondsmen for his client, Greeley suggested two prominent Union men, and added, If my name should be found necessary, you may use that. His name was asked for, and he went to Richmond, and there, in May, 1867, signed the bond with Gerritt Smith, Commodore Vanderbilt, and others. This act brought down on him such an avalanche of denunciation from his party and personal admirers as he had never incurred. His motives were attacked, his interview with Davis misrepresented, and he was handed over by thousands of Republicans to the company of the late rebels. An indication of the public feeling was furnished by its effect on the sale of his history of the rebellion. In his own words, that sale then almost ceased for a season; thousands who had sub
Vallandigham (search for this): chapter 9
onfided to it by the nation under the most solemn of all political sanctions; and, if it had any such thought, it would still have abundant reason to know that peace proposed at the cost of dissolution would be immediately, unreservedly, and indignantly rejected by the American people. Henry J. Raymond, in his journal, Scribner's Monthly, March, 1880. mentions that Collector Barney told him in Washington, on January 25, 1863, that he knew that Greeley had been in correspondence with Vallandigham about mediation, and that later Greeley said to him (Raymond), on the Albany boat, that he meant to carry out the policy of foreign mediation, and of bringing the war to a close. You'll see, said he, that I'll drive Lincoln into it. On the way back to New York one of the trustees of the Tribune Association told Raymond that the trustees would not permit Greeley to continue the advocacy of intervention in the paper. In one of its articles favoring mediation by a friendly foreign pow
Vallandigham (search for this): chapter 11
l from, 246; editorials during Liberal campaign, 248, 249; Greeley's return to, 253; Crumbs of Comfort editorial, 254-256; Greeley's fear for, 257. Tyler, President, John, tariff recommendations, 113; Tribune's support of, 113; Greeley's view of, 113, 114, 146; veto of tariff bill, 114; on Texas annexation, 140-142. U. Union League Club, proposed action against Greeley, 221, 222. Universal amnesty, 217. Upshur, A. P., Secretary of State, a Texas annexationist, 141. V. Vallandigham, Greeley's reported correspondence with, 195. Van Buren, Martin, Greeley's thrust at, 51; tariff views, 111; Free Soil candidate , 127; on Texas question, 140, 142, 143; Van Buren-Adams ticket, 151. W. Walker, R. J., tariff views, 121. Webb, James Watson, on Greeley's dress, 11. Webster, Daniel, on Texas question, 138, 139, 141 ; 7th of March speech, 153-158. Weed, Thurlow, founding of the Albany Journal, 40; first meeting with Greeley, 42; the Jeffersonian, 43; Weed
A. P. Upshur (search for this): chapter 8
eady exist among us. But when, in March, 1842, Texas made another offer of annexation, Webster strongly opposed it, and in May, 1843, he left the Cabinet-too late to escape the criticisms of his warmest party friends. The new Secretary of State-Upshur, of Virginia--was a strong annexationist, and the administration began at once secretly to take steps to carry out its policy. The elections of 1842 had given the Democrats a big majority in the House, but the Senate had to be reckoned with in she United States' diplomatic agent an assurance that no power would be permitted by the United States to invade Texas territory because of such a treaty, an envoy from Texas was sent to Washington to complete the negotiations. Before his arrival Upshur had been killed by the explosion on the frigate Princeton; in March, 1844, Calhoun took his place; and on April 12 the treaty was signed and ten days later sent to the Senate, where, on June 8, it was defeated by a vote of sixteen yeas to thirty
A. P. Upshur (search for this): chapter 11
during the Liberal Republican convention, 237-239; Greeley's withdrawal from, 246; editorials during Liberal campaign, 248, 249; Greeley's return to, 253; Crumbs of Comfort editorial, 254-256; Greeley's fear for, 257. Tyler, President, John, tariff recommendations, 113; Tribune's support of, 113; Greeley's view of, 113, 114, 146; veto of tariff bill, 114; on Texas annexation, 140-142. U. Union League Club, proposed action against Greeley, 221, 222. Universal amnesty, 217. Upshur, A. P., Secretary of State, a Texas annexationist, 141. V. Vallandigham, Greeley's reported correspondence with, 195. Van Buren, Martin, Greeley's thrust at, 51; tariff views, 111; Free Soil candidate , 127; on Texas question, 140, 142, 143; Van Buren-Adams ticket, 151. W. Walker, R. J., tariff views, 121. Webb, James Watson, on Greeley's dress, 11. Webster, Daniel, on Texas question, 138, 139, 141 ; 7th of March speech, 153-158. Weed, Thurlow, founding of the Albany
Unionists (search for this): chapter 9
he policy of foreign mediation, and of bringing the war to a close. You'll see, said he, that I'll drive Lincoln into it. On the way back to New York one of the trustees of the Tribune Association told Raymond that the trustees would not permit Greeley to continue the advocacy of intervention in the paper. In one of its articles favoring mediation by a friendly foreign power, the Tribune (in January, 1863) said: The prevalent opinion on that [European] side of the Atlantic blames us Unionists more than the rebels because it is their belief that the rebels are willing and anxious for peace on any terms that impartial judges shall deem fair, while our Government will listen to no terms short of unconditional submission to its authority, and this conviction does very great harm to our cause. It would therefore assume that a foreign offer of mediation was friendly and generous, and agree to consider arbitration when the Confederate assent thereto had been obtained. Raymond als
John Tyler (search for this): chapter 7
message at the opening of the regular session in the following December, President Tyler recommended tariff revision, with a view to the substitution of discriminaised him from obscurity and neglect to the pinnacle of power. The Tribune gave Tyler faithful support in the early part of his administration, even taking the view ank bill. But a visit to Washington in December, 1841, convinced Greeley that Tyler was treacherously coqueting with Loco-focoism with a view to his own renominatiction of Henry Clay next President as the veto of an efficient tariff bill by John Tyler .... If a distinct and unequivocal issue can be made upon the great leading qcoming election. That year witnessed the struggle over the tariff between President Tyler and the Whig Congress, the President vetoing two bills Of Tyler's veto,Tyler's veto, the Tribune said: If the spirit of national pride — the feeling of free sovereignty among the people --had not been stifled and destroyed by gradual and almost impe
John Tyler (search for this): chapter 8
Prussia as arbitrator; but when the time at which the arrangement was to expire (1842) arrived, many claims remained unsettled. It was charged then that these claims were allowed to remain unadjusted in order to keep the Texas question open. Tyler's elevation to the presidency, through the death of Harrison, gave the country an executive who was ready to make Texas annexation a part of his policy, no matter how the party that had elected him viewed the matter. Six months after his inaugu deprecated, for reasons of policy, any Northern commingling of the questions of annexation and slavery for the present. In other words, Greeley as well as Clay would have been glad to keep the slavery question out of the pending campaign. But Tyler's Texas scheme so aroused the editor's indignation that no question of policy could quiet his abhorrence of the President, whose impeachment for moving troops to the Sabine he suggested. When warned of the effect of its opposition to annexation
John Tyler (search for this): chapter 11
erience with beggars, 106-108; editorial-room pictures, 108, 109; advocate of a protective tariff, 110-122; views of President Tyler, 113, 114; early prominence as a protection advocate, 115; his tariff principles, 116-118; support of Clay in 1844, vania enterprise, 82. Sylvester, S. J., 24. T. Tariff, Greeley's views on, 110-122; compromise of 1833, 110-113; Tyler's position, 113, 114; the leading political issue, 114; Greeley's early advocacy of protection, 115-118; Clay campaign ofpiritualism, 90, 91; its agricultural department, 91; exposure of mileage abuse, 100; Greeley's thorough editing, 103; on Tyler's tariff bill veto, 114; Clay edition, 119; part in the antislavery contest, 123; on the Abolitionists, 129, 156; on fugil campaign, 248, 249; Greeley's return to, 253; Crumbs of Comfort editorial, 254-256; Greeley's fear for, 257. Tyler, President, John, tariff recommendations, 113; Tribune's support of, 113; Greeley's view of, 113, 114, 146; veto of tariff bill, 1
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