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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.).

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September 9th (search for this): chapter 2.14
rn in Whitman's temperament, he soon haughtily resigned his position, because of a difference with his employers, and left for home 27 May. Almost immediately after his arrival he was engaged by Judge Samuel E. Johnson to edit (and nominally to own) a new Free-Soil paper, the weekly Changed to a daily in April, 1849. Brooklyn Freeman, as the organ of those Democrats with whom Whitman, but not the party leaders behind the Eagle, had sympathized the year before. The new paper appeared 9 September, but it had the hard fortune to be burnt out, with no insurance, in a great conflagration that swept the city that very night. But the Freeman was revived in November, and, though a small and apparently a very outspoken sheet, it attained a large circulation. The nature of the political warfare in those days of personal invective may be suggested by Whitman's valedictory, published when, without explanation, he resigned the paper, 11 September, 1849, into the hands of those who would co
ca. In the summer he published a new volume of his tales, and in the fall, a collected edition of his poems, The Raven and other poems. Early in the year he became assistant editor of The Broadway journal; in July he became sole editor, and in October editor and proprietor of this paper; and thus was enabled to realize an ambition that he had cherished for more than a decade, to edit a paper of his own. But owing to financial embarrassments arising from various causes, he was compelled to give up this paper at the end of the year. During the first half of 1846 he was ill, so he himself claimed, for several months. In the middle of the year (May to October) he published, in Godey's Lady's Book, his Literati, a series of biographical—critical papers dealing with the chief living writers of Gotham; and the year was further made memorable by the controversy with Thomas Dunn English engendered by the publication of the Literati, and by a scandal growing out of his friendship with the
nineties that the tide which had begun in The Overland monthly in 1868 came to its full. Perhaps the most interesting transition during the period is that which may be traced in the work of Constance Fenimore Woolson (1838-94), a grandniece of Cooper, a native of New Hampshire, and a dweller successively by the Great Lakes, in the South, and in Italy, where she died. At the beginning of the seventies Miss Woolson was writing unlocalized poetic stories for Harper's, A Merry Christmas, An October idyl, and the like, tales that might have come from the early period of Rose Terry Cooke. But soon one notes a change, a new sense of the value of background and of strongly individualized types for characters. By 1874 she was choosing the West for her materials. Her Solomon is a study of a unique character in an isolated German settlement on One-leg Creek which flows into the Tuscarawas River in Ohio, and her Jeanette and most of the other stories in Castle nowhere (1875) deal with the
d or village life in New England, 217 Notes on the situation, 318 Notes on Virginia, 201 Notes on Walt Whitman as Poet and Person, 262 n. Nothing to wear, 241 Nott, Henry Junius, 152 Novellettes of a traveller, or, Odds and ends from the Knapsack of Thomas Singularity, journeyman printer, 152 November Boughs, 272 Oath of freedom, 305 O'Brien, Fitz-James, 373-374, 375 O Captain! My Captain! 286 O'Connor, Wm. Douglas, 270, 388 Octave Thanet. See French, Alice October idyl, an, 381 Odd-Fellow's Offering, The, 170, 175 Odd Miss Todd, 373 Ode on the Confederate dead, 301, 303, 304, 309-310 Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration, 286, 287 Ogden vs. Saunders, 93 n. O'Hara, Theodore, 290, 311 O. Henry. See Porter, William Sydney Old black Joe, 353 Old Chester tales, 390 Old Creole days, 384 Old-Fashioned Girl, An, 402 Old Folks at home, 353 Old Ironsides, 226, 237 Oldmixon, John, 107 Old Sergeant, the, 281 Old times,
behind the Eagle, had sympathized the year before. The new paper appeared 9 September, but it had the hard fortune to be burnt out, with no insurance, in a great conflagration that swept the city that very night. But the Freeman was revived in November, and, though a small and apparently a very outspoken sheet, it attained a large circulation. The nature of the political warfare in those days of personal invective may be suggested by Whitman's valedictory, published when, without explanation,r . . . expecting death, and who had been fleeced by his New York publishers; Specimen days and collect (1882-3), a diary of an invalid, which contains some of Whitman's most characteristic prose and is a storehouse of autobiographical data; and November Boughs (1888), containing reprints of short poems that Whitman had been writing regularly for the New York Herald and of miscellaneous prose essays that had appeared elsewhere, the most significant of these being A Backward Glance O'er Travel'd
ecially of writing poetry. He began his novel, Tiger Lilies, and sent several poems to his father for criticism. In 1864, however, he was transferred to Wilmington, North Carolina, where he served as signal officer on the blockade runners. In November he was captured in the Gulf Stream and sent to Point Lookout Prison in Maryland. There he continued to play the flute, which won him the friendship of Tabb. He busied himself with German poetry, but the prison conditions were so loathsome as tth music, which I have studied and cultivated far more than poetry. Inspired with this new faith, he again repaired to New York, this time determined to settle his future. He revelled in the musical associations which he quickly formed. By November he had been engaged by Asger Hamerik for the position of first flute in the new Peabody Orchestra forming in Baltimore. On 29 November he wrote his declaration of independence to his father: Why should I, nay, how can I, settle myself down
17, 125, 135, 135 n., 140, 163, 164, 165, 169, 209, 247, 401, 406 Norton, Andrews, 197, 207, 208, 209-211 Norton, Charles Eliot, 39, 197, 247, 401 Norton, Rev., John, 209 Norwood or village life in New England, 217 Notes on the situation, 318 Notes on Virginia, 201 Notes on Walt Whitman as Poet and Person, 262 n. Nothing to wear, 241 Nott, Henry Junius, 152 Novellettes of a traveller, or, Odds and ends from the Knapsack of Thomas Singularity, journeyman printer, 152 November Boughs, 272 Oath of freedom, 305 O'Brien, Fitz-James, 373-374, 375 O Captain! My Captain! 286 O'Connor, Wm. Douglas, 270, 388 Octave Thanet. See French, Alice October idyl, an, 381 Odd-Fellow's Offering, The, 170, 175 Odd Miss Todd, 373 Ode on the Confederate dead, 301, 303, 304, 309-310 Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration, 286, 287 Ogden vs. Saunders, 93 n. O'Hara, Theodore, 290, 311 O. Henry. See Porter, William Sydney Old black Joe, 353 Old
November 29th (search for this): chapter 2.17
on several instruments before I could write legibly; and since then, the very deepest of my life has been filled with music, which I have studied and cultivated far more than poetry. Inspired with this new faith, he again repaired to New York, this time determined to settle his future. He revelled in the musical associations which he quickly formed. By November he had been engaged by Asger Hamerik for the position of first flute in the new Peabody Orchestra forming in Baltimore. On 29 November he wrote his declaration of independence to his father: Why should I, nay, how can I, settle myself down to be a third-rate struggling lawyer for the balance of my little life as long as there is a certainty almost absolute that I can do some other thing so much better. Several persons, from whose judgment there can be no appeal, have told me, for instance, that I am the greatest flute-player in the world; and several others, of equally authoritative judgment, have given me an almost
ems, Tamerlane and other poems, a collection of ten fugitive pieces, all brief save one, and all plainly imitative either of Byron or of Moore. In February, 1829, Mrs. Allan died, and in April Poe was discharged from the army, a substitute having been provided, and efforts were made to obtain for him an appointment to West Point. Some time intervened, however, before an appointment could be procured, and it was not until July, 1830, that he was admitted to the Academy. In the preceding December he had published at Baltimore a second volume of poems, made up largely of his earlier pieces revised, but containing his long poem Al Aaraaf, the most ambitious and the most promising of his earlier productions. At West Point he took high rank in his classes; but in October, 1830, John Allan had married a second time, and Poe, concluding that there was no longer any prospect of succeeding to a fortune, determined with the beginning of the new year to bring about his dismissal from the Aca
occupations. Born in 1819 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the colonial house where he was to spend most of his life, he went to Harvard College, studied law—and abandoned it for a career of letters. He contributed verses and sketches to the magazines, edited a few numbers of an unsuccessful literary journal, The pioneer, brought out his first volume of poems, A Year's Life, in 1841, a second volume in 1843, and a collection of essays, Conversations on some of the old poets, in 1844. In December of this year he was married to the poetess Maria White. The nine years of their married life until her death in 1853 mark a distinct period in Lowell's literary work. He contributed constantly both prose and verse to various journals, at first largely for those of the anti-slavery propaganda; and the Mexican War gave the opportunity for The Biglow papers, the first of which appeared in The Boston Courier of 17 June, 1846. In 1848 appeared a second collection of poems, the completed Biglo
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