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May 8th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
rigade commanded by McRae, promoted to brigadier-general. Lieutenant-Colonel Hobbs, who had served several sessions as clerk of the house of representatives of Arkansas, became colonel. The Fourth Arkansas infantry was organized at Miller's Springs, Lawrence county, Mo., August 17, 1861, by the election of Col. Evander McNair, of Hempstead county; Lieut.-Col. A. Bryce Williams, of Hempstead county; Maj. J. H. Clay, of Montgomery county. The regiment was reorganized at Corinth, Miss., May 8, 1862. The companies were commanded as follows: Company A, of Calhoun county, Capt. Joseph B. McCulloch, succeeded by First Lieut. George Eberhart, Second Lieut. Wiley C. Brown, Third Lieut. H. G. Bunn (who afterward became major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel of the regiment). Company B, of Hempstead county, Capt. Rufus K. Garland, elected to the Confederate Congress and succeeded by First Lieut. Henry J. Bonner, Second Lieut. J. W. Paup, Third Lieut. John L. Loudermilk; Henry J. Bonner, mad
June 3rd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
by hard marching under Stonewall Jackson, whom Colonel Rust described as an impracticable old schoolmaster, who said grace before he ate and prayed before going to bed. The regiment was engaged in the battles of Greenbrier and Allegheny. Under Stonewall Jackson at Winchester, in January, 1862, it marched to Bath and Romney, returned to Winchester, and was ordered thence to Fredericksburg, and assigned to the brigade of Gen. T. H. Holmes. It was engaged in the battle of White Oak Swamp, June 3, 1862; in J. G. Walker's brigade, July 1, 1862, participated in the battle of Malvern Hill, and was at Sharpsburg September 17, 1862, where Colonel Manning was seriously wounded. At Fredericksburg it was assigned to Hood's Texas brigade, commanded by General Robertson, and was recruited by consolidating with it Bronaugh's battalion of five Arkansas companies. It was not engaged at the battle of Chancellorsville, as it was with Longstreet at that time at Suffolk. It participated in the battle
July, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
en. A. S. Johnston to Corinth, Miss. Brig.-Gen. W. J. Hardee having been promoted to major-general, Col; T. C. Hindman, of the Second Arkansas, was promoted to brigadier-general, and held command until he was made major-general, when Col. R. G. Shaver was placed in command of the brigade and led it gallantly at the bloody battle of Shiloh, General Hindman commanding the division. When Corinth was evacuated, the brigade retreated to Tupelo, Miss., where it remained until the latter part of July, 1862. Then the regiment was sent to Chattanooga with General Bragg, and from there on the Kentucky campaign. It was present when 4,500 Federals surrendered at Munfordville, Ky., and was in line at Perryville, where Adjt. Sampson Harris, of Company A, was mortally wounded. Sergt. W. W. Carter, of Company A, was promoted to lieutenant and succeeded Lieutenant Harris as adjutant. Before the regiment left Corinth, Miss., about 200 of the Twelfth Arkansas regiment were organized into two compani
July 1st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
, whom Colonel Rust described as an impracticable old schoolmaster, who said grace before he ate and prayed before going to bed. The regiment was engaged in the battles of Greenbrier and Allegheny. Under Stonewall Jackson at Winchester, in January, 1862, it marched to Bath and Romney, returned to Winchester, and was ordered thence to Fredericksburg, and assigned to the brigade of Gen. T. H. Holmes. It was engaged in the battle of White Oak Swamp, June 3, 1862; in J. G. Walker's brigade, July 1, 1862, participated in the battle of Malvern Hill, and was at Sharpsburg September 17, 1862, where Colonel Manning was seriously wounded. At Fredericksburg it was assigned to Hood's Texas brigade, commanded by General Robertson, and was recruited by consolidating with it Bronaugh's battalion of five Arkansas companies. It was not engaged at the battle of Chancellorsville, as it was with Longstreet at that time at Suffolk. It participated in the battle of Gettysburg, in Longstreet's corps, an
July 2nd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
cceeded Lieutenant Harris as adjutant. Before the regiment left Corinth, Miss., about 200 of the Twelfth Arkansas regiment were organized into two companies and placed in the Sixth. In December, at Shelbyville, they were sent back to their own regiment, which had been exchanged. This reduced the Sixth considerably, and it was consolidated with the Seventh Arkansas infantry, about December 15, 1862. The regiment was engaged in the battle of Murfreesboro, December 31, 1862, and January 1 and 2, 1863; and in the spring advanced to Bellbuckle, where it remained until June 24, 1863, when it was hastily ordered to the front to Liberty Gap, where it found the Fifth Arkansas struggling with a large force. It retreated from middle Tennessee to south of Tennessee river, went into camp at Chickamauga station, a few miles from Chattanooga, and remained there until about the 1st of September, when Bragg began maneuvering for the battle of Chickamauga. The regiment was engaged, actually, or i
July 3rd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
apt. Thomas Cochran; Company D, Capt. James Portis, afterward Capt. Watt Green; Company E, Capt. J. S. Somerville, afterward William Cooper; Company F, Capt. O. B. Tebbs; Company G, Capt. E. L. Murtree, afterward C. Stell; Company H, Capt. Phil Echols, later Capt. James Oliver; Company I, Capt. M. L. Hawkins. On the retreat of Generals Bragg and Beauregard from Corinth to Tupelo, Miss., the Second Arkansas again formed part of the rear guard of the army, under Gen. John C. Breckinridge. July 3, 1862, it was ordered with Clayton's Second Alabama under Gen. James R. Chalmers against the Federals at Booneville, Miss., who were completely routed. Together with the Second Missouri cavalry, it was ordered, under Gen. Frank C. Armstrong, to Tennessee, where it met at Middleburg, Tenn., the Federals under Colonel Leggett, and defeated the enemy, killing and wounding large numbers of them. About the last of July the Second Arkansas, under Colonel Slemons, the Second Missouri, under Cot Robe
September, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ld, Ill., then to Camp Chase (Chicago), the officers to Johnson's island, Lake Erie. Lieutenant Gibson, of Company H, was shot dead on Johnson's island by a Federal sentinel because he crossed the dead line. The two regiments were exchanged September, 1862. The year of the first enlistment expiring there was a reorganization, which resulted as follows: Col. John L. Logan, Lieut.-Col. M. D. Vance, Maj. James T. Poe, Adjt. Edward A. Warren, Quartermaster E. Whitfield, Commissary Clark, Surgeon . Carnahan; Company H, Capt. G. D. R. Preston, then J. B. Cloud; Company I, Capt. Daniel Boone; Company K, Capt. James Waldron. The regiment participated in the movements around Corinth on the approach of the Federal army under Halleck. In September, 1862, it took part in the battle of Iuka, and in October, 1862, it participated in the desperate assault on the Federal encampment at Corinth, where it lost heavily. Lieut. J. H. Berry, who lost a leg in this battle, was afterward prosecuting at
September 17th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
before he ate and prayed before going to bed. The regiment was engaged in the battles of Greenbrier and Allegheny. Under Stonewall Jackson at Winchester, in January, 1862, it marched to Bath and Romney, returned to Winchester, and was ordered thence to Fredericksburg, and assigned to the brigade of Gen. T. H. Holmes. It was engaged in the battle of White Oak Swamp, June 3, 1862; in J. G. Walker's brigade, July 1, 1862, participated in the battle of Malvern Hill, and was at Sharpsburg September 17, 1862, where Colonel Manning was seriously wounded. At Fredericksburg it was assigned to Hood's Texas brigade, commanded by General Robertson, and was recruited by consolidating with it Bronaugh's battalion of five Arkansas companies. It was not engaged at the battle of Chancellorsville, as it was with Longstreet at that time at Suffolk. It participated in the battle of Gettysburg, in Longstreet's corps, and fought at Chickamauga, September 19 and 20, 1863, where the gallant Major Reedy w
September 19th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
tle of Malvern Hill, and was at Sharpsburg September 17, 1862, where Colonel Manning was seriously wounded. At Fredericksburg it was assigned to Hood's Texas brigade, commanded by General Robertson, and was recruited by consolidating with it Bronaugh's battalion of five Arkansas companies. It was not engaged at the battle of Chancellorsville, as it was with Longstreet at that time at Suffolk. It participated in the battle of Gettysburg, in Longstreet's corps, and fought at Chickamauga, September 19 and 20, 1863, where the gallant Major Reedy was mortally wounded. From there it went with Longstreet to Knoxville, and under General Gregg, of Texas, was in the battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864; marching at double-quick several miles that morning to save the Confederate line. In the engagement that day, its colonel, Manning, was shot through the thigh, and being captured was detained a prisoner of war until three months after the surrender of Lee. Judge Joe Alexander, as a private
October, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
loud; Company I, Capt. Daniel Boone; Company K, Capt. James Waldron. The regiment participated in the movements around Corinth on the approach of the Federal army under Halleck. In September, 1862, it took part in the battle of Iuka, and in October, 1862, it participated in the desperate assault on the Federal encampment at Corinth, where it lost heavily. Lieut. J. H. Berry, who lost a leg in this battle, was afterward prosecuting attorney, judge, governor, and United States senator from Ark, James Imboden and P. T. Wood, who survived the siege of Port Hudson and the war. The gallant little command took an active part in the battles of Iuka, Rienzi, the big skirmish at Farmington, near Corinth, and did good service at Corinth in October, 1862. After the capitulation of Port Hudson the men who were paroled and exchanged went into the service claiming their organization, but were consolidated with the Eighteenth and Twenty-third. They took part in the battle of Marks' Mills, and w
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