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John Janney (search for this): chapter 60
votes his sword to his native State. Bidding an affectionate adieu to his old friend and commander, General Scott, who mourned his loss, but nobly expressed his confidence in his motives, he repaired to Richmond. Governor John Letcher immediately appointed him to the command-in-chief of the Virginia forces, and the Convention unanimously confirmed the nomination. Memorable and impressive was the scene when he came into the presence of that body on April 23d. Its venerable President, John Janney, with brief, sententious eloquence, addressed him, and concluded saying: Sir, we have by this unanimous vote expressed our convictions that you are at this day, among the living citizens of Virginia, first in war. We pray to God most fervently that you may so conduct the operations committed to your charge, that it may be said of you that you are first in peace, and when that time comes, you will have earned the still prouder distinction of being first in the hearts of your country
Thomas Jefferson (search for this): chapter 60
great body of General Johnston's army had reorganized itself under the laws of the Confederacy, while lying under the fire of the enemy's guns, the privates of each company electing by ballot the officers that were to command them. A singular exercise of suffrage was this, but there was a free ballot and a fair count, and an exhibition worthy of That fierce Democracy that thundered over Greece To Macedon and Artaxerxes' throne. —an exhibition which would have delighted the heart of Thomas Jefferson, and which certainly put to blush the autocratic theory that armies should be mere compact masses of brute force. Still later on, May 31st, Johnston had sallied forth and stormed and taken the outer entrenchments and camps of McClellan's army at Seven Pines, capturing ten pieces of artillery, six thousand muskets, and other spoils of war, and destroying the prestige of the second On to Richmond movement. But ere the day was done victory had been checked, and glory had exacted costl
Edward Johnston (search for this): chapter 60
shes of our heroic dead; and again the bugles sound boots and saddles, and the long roll is beating. Less than a month has passed, and again the Army of Northern Virginia is in motion, and while Hooker is groping around to ascertain the whereabouts of his adversary, the next scence unfolds: General Early has planned and executed a flank march around Winchester, worthy of Stonewall Jackson,—the men of his division are mounting the parapets on June 14th, and capturing Milroy's guns. General Edward Johnston's division is pursuing Milroy's fugitives down the Valley pike. General Rodes has captured Martinsburg with 100 prisoners, and five cannon,—Ewell's corps is master of the Valley,—and by June 24th, the Army of Northern Virginia is in Pennsylvania, while for the third time the Army of the Potomac is glad if it can interpose to prevent the fall of Washington—and a sixth commander has come to its head—General George C. Meade. Then follows the boldest and grandest assault of modern
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 60
es and Gentlemen: The sickness of General Joseph E. Johnston, the distinguished President of the he death of General Breckinridge General Joseph E. Johnston, the senior surviving officer of the Conad sensibly declined. The fall of General Joseph E. Johnston and the Oppor-Tunity of Lee. Meane in history under its famous commander, Joseph E. Johnston, and I cannot speak that name without boment. Still later in the progress of events, Johnston had exhibited again his strategic skill in hoo parallel in history. The great body of General Johnston's army had reorganized itself under the ls of brute force. Still later on, May 31st, Johnston had sallied forth and stormed and taken the oed, and glory had exacted costly tribute, for Johnston himself had fallen, terribly wounded. The hend fighting ground in the Carolinas with Joseph E. Johnston, who, amongst the first to meet the foe,, and from Manassas to Appomattox, under Joseph E. Johnston, and Thomas J. Jackson, and Robert E. Le
J. William Jones (search for this): chapter 60
er of wisdom— unerring judgment combined with exquisite taste. The literature that may be found in the letters of the great, unfolds the very essence of the genius of the men, and of the times they lived in; and in my humble judgment it were sufficient to read the letters written by General Lee, and which are collated in the beautiful memorial volume Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and Letters of General R. E. Lee, by J Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society. prepared by Rev. Dr. J. Wm. Jones, to discern that the writer was one who profoundly comprehended the topics of the day, and wielded a pen as vigorous and polished as his sword. And when we contemplate in connection with his deeds, the fair and lofty character that is mirrored in them, we behold one whose strong, equitable and wide-reaching mind was such that had he devoted it to jurisprudence, had made the name of Justice as venerable and august as when a Marshall enunciated the law; who, had he been a statesman,
William Jones (search for this): chapter 60
ult situations, to possess that quality which is the consummate flower of wisdom— unerring judgment combined with exquisite taste. The literature that may be found in the letters of the great, unfolds the very essence of the genius of the men, and of the times they lived in; and in my humble judgment it were sufficient to read the letters written by General Lee, and which are collated in the beautiful memorial volume Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and Letters of General R. E. Lee, by J Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society. prepared by Rev. Dr. J. Wm. Jones, to discern that the writer was one who profoundly comprehended the topics of the day, and wielded a pen as vigorous and polished as his sword. And when we contemplate in connection with his deeds, the fair and lofty character that is mirrored in them, we behold one whose strong, equitable and wide-reaching mind was such that had he devoted it to jurisprudence, had made the name of Justice as venerable and august a
Philip Kearney (search for this): chapter 60
blue and gray, heaped around him in indiscriminate carnage—his first thought and care were for them, alike in their common suffering. So it was that whether in Pennsylvania, Maryland, or Virginia, he restrained every excess of conduct, and held the reckless and the ruthless within those bounds which duty sets to action. So it was that to one homeless during the days of strife, he wrote: Occupy yourself in helping those more helpless than yourself. So it was, that when the gallant General Phil. Kearney fell at Ox Hill, he sent his sword and horse through the lines to his mourning widow—and that when Lincoln was struck down by an assassin's hand, he denounced the deed as a crime previously unknown to the country, and one that must be deprecated by every American. And so, too, when one day here, a man humbly clad sought alms at his door, Lee pointed to his retiring form and said: That is one of our old soldiers who is in necessitous circumstances. He fought on the other side, but w
tasks with keenest weapons and brightest armor. What glowing names are these that shine on the rolls of the alumni of this honored Alma Mater! Church and State, Field and Forum, Bar and Bench, Hospital and Counting-Room, Lecture-Room and Pulpit—what famous champions and teachers of the right, what trusty workers and leaders in literature and law, and arts, and arms, have they not found in her sons! Seven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly,
Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. Remarks of General Early—oration of Major John W. Daniel, Ll.D., of Va.—description of the ceremonies, &c. The occasion of the unveiling of Valentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in our records. General J. A. Early, First Vice-President of the Lee attached to the University chapel, which latter had been constructed under the supervision of General Lee himself, where his remains should be deposited in a vault, to be surmounted by a recumbent fi figure, and years ago he completed his work in a manner that links his name forever with that of Lee. Upon the death of General Breckinridge General Joseph E. Johnston, the senior surviving officer of the Confederate army, and the predecessor of General Lee in command of that army, which, under the lead of the latter, became so renowned as the Army of Northern Virginia, was made the Preside
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 60
s tested will they yield! As the day dawns, a remnant of the cavalry under Fitz. Lee is forming, and Gordon's infantry, scarce two thousand strong, are touching eArmy of the James, under Ord—a solid phalanx stands right athwart the path of Fitz. Lee's and Gordon's men. Too late! the die is cast! The doom is sealed! There ir, for he had done his all, and all was lost, save Honor.! Surrender. General Lee, dressed in his best uniform, rides to the front to meet General Grant. Formeet at the McLean House to concert its terms. The first and abiding thought of Lee was the honor of his men, for he had determined to cut his way out at all hazards were not granted as he thought his army was entitled to demand. General, said Lee, addressing Grant, and opening the conversation, I deem it due to proper candor ar together. I have done my best for you; my heart is too full to say more, was Lee's utterance to the ragged, battle-begrimed boys in gray, who, when the dread new
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