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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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August, 1716 AD (search for this): chapter 60
It was nearly a century after the settlement at Jamestown, that Governor Spotswood of Virginia, at the head of a troop of horse, first explored the hitherto unknown land beyond the mountains, and upon his return from the expedition, the Governor presented to each of his bold companions, a golden horseshoe, inscribed with the legend: Sic jurat transcendere montes, as a memorial of the event; a circumstance which caused them to be named in history, The Knights of the Golden Horseshoe. In August, 1716, these adventurous spirits first looked down from the heights of the Blue Ridge upon the beautiful Valley of Virginia,—a virgin land indeed, tenanted only by the roving red men. Glorious must have been the thrill of joy that quickened their hearts, as the tempting vision lay spread before them, as their eyes ranged over the fields and forests of this new land of promise in its summer sheen,—a land watered with many rivers, and especially with that beautiful and abounding river, the Shenan
a great and thriving people, slow were the footsteps that followed the pioneers and occupied the huntinggrounds of the receding Indians. For in those days immigration was not quickened by steam and electricity, and early tradition had pictured the transmontane country as a barren and gloomy waste, infested with serpents and wild beasts and brutal savages. But erewhile the reports of Spotswood and his men went far and wide, and the Star of Empire beamed over the Alleghanies. And along, in 1730 and 1740, we find the spray of the incoming tide breaking over the mountains—the sturdy Scotch-Irish for the most part, with some Germans and Englishmen, pouring into the Valley from Pennsylvania and Eastern Virginia, and from the fatherlands over the water. Not speculative adventurers were they, with the ambition of landlords, but bringing with them rifle and Bible, wife and child, and simple household goods—home-seekers and homebuilders, who had heard of the goodly land, and who had come t
nd thriving people, slow were the footsteps that followed the pioneers and occupied the huntinggrounds of the receding Indians. For in those days immigration was not quickened by steam and electricity, and early tradition had pictured the transmontane country as a barren and gloomy waste, infested with serpents and wild beasts and brutal savages. But erewhile the reports of Spotswood and his men went far and wide, and the Star of Empire beamed over the Alleghanies. And along, in 1730 and 1740, we find the spray of the incoming tide breaking over the mountains—the sturdy Scotch-Irish for the most part, with some Germans and Englishmen, pouring into the Valley from Pennsylvania and Eastern Virginia, and from the fatherlands over the water. Not speculative adventurers were they, with the ambition of landlords, but bringing with them rifle and Bible, wife and child, and simple household goods—home-seekers and homebuilders, who had heard of the goodly land, and who had come to stay, a
hand-maids of each other. And showing their instinctive refinement, where the corn waved its tassels, and the wheat bowed to the wind, by their rude log huts in the wilderness, there also the vine clambered, and the rose and lily bloomed. In 1749, near Greeneville, in Augusta county—and Augusta county was then an empire stretching from the Blue Ridge mountains to the Mississippi river—in 1749, Robert Alexander, a Scotch-Irish immigrant, who was a Master of Arts of Trinity College, Dublin, 1749, Robert Alexander, a Scotch-Irish immigrant, who was a Master of Arts of Trinity College, Dublin, established there The Augusta Academy—the first classical school in the Valley of Virginia. Under his successor, Rev. John Brown, the academy was first moved to Old Providence, and again to New Providence church, and just before the Revolution, for a third time, to Mount Pleasant, near Fairfield, in the new county of Rockbridge. In 1776, as the revolutionary fires were kindling, there came to its head as principal William Graham, of worthy memory, who had been a class-mate and special friend<
rom the Blue Ridge mountains to the Mississippi river—in 1749, Robert Alexander, a Scotch-Irish immigrant, who was a Master of Arts of Trinity College, Dublin, established there The Augusta Academy—the first classical school in the Valley of Virginia. Under his successor, Rev. John Brown, the academy was first moved to Old Providence, and again to New Providence church, and just before the Revolution, for a third time, to Mount Pleasant, near Fairfield, in the new county of Rockbridge. In 1776, as the revolutionary fires were kindling, there came to its head as principal William Graham, of worthy memory, who had been a class-mate and special friend of Harry Lee at Princeton College; and at the first meeting of the trustees after the battle of Lexington, while Harry Lee was donning his sword for battle, they baptized it as Liberty Hall Academy. Another removal followed, in 1777, to near the old Timber-Ridge church; but finally, in 1785, the academy rested from its wanderings near L
e Revolution, for a third time, to Mount Pleasant, near Fairfield, in the new county of Rockbridge. In 1776, as the revolutionary fires were kindling, there came to its head as principal William Graham, of worthy memory, who had been a class-mate and special friend of Harry Lee at Princeton College; and at the first meeting of the trustees after the battle of Lexington, while Harry Lee was donning his sword for battle, they baptized it as Liberty Hall Academy. Another removal followed, in 1777, to near the old Timber-Ridge church; but finally, in 1785, the academy rested from its wanderings near Lexington, the little town which too had caught the flame of revolution, and was the first to take the name of that early battle-ground of the great rebellion, where The embattled farmers stood And fired the shot heard round the world. Washington Academy and Washington College. Shortly after the close of the Revolutionary war, the Legislature of Virginia, in token of esteem and a
rfield, in the new county of Rockbridge. In 1776, as the revolutionary fires were kindling, there came to its head as principal William Graham, of worthy memory, who had been a class-mate and special friend of Harry Lee at Princeton College; and at the first meeting of the trustees after the battle of Lexington, while Harry Lee was donning his sword for battle, they baptized it as Liberty Hall Academy. Another removal followed, in 1777, to near the old Timber-Ridge church; but finally, in 1785, the academy rested from its wanderings near Lexington, the little town which too had caught the flame of revolution, and was the first to take the name of that early battle-ground of the great rebellion, where The embattled farmers stood And fired the shot heard round the world. Washington Academy and Washington College. Shortly after the close of the Revolutionary war, the Legislature of Virginia, in token of esteem and admiration for the virtues and services of General George Wa
irtues and services of General George Washington, donated him one hundred shares of stock in the old James River Company. General Washington, in a characteristic manner, declined to accept the donation save only on the condition that he be permitted to appropriate it to some public purpose in the upper part of the State, such as the education of the children of the poor, particularly the children of such as have fallen in defence of the country. The condition granted, President Washington in 1796—for he had then become President of the New Republic—dedicated the one hundred shares of stock to the use of Liberty Hall Academy in Rockbridge county. Mayhap the friendship between William Graham, its principal, and his old class-mate at Princeton, Light Horse Harry Lee, the friend of Washington, had something to do in guiding the benefaction; but be this as it may, it was given and accepted, and in honor of the benefactor the academy was clothed with his immortal name. In acknowledging
enabled me to bestow upon Liberty Hall—now by your politeness called Washington Academy—is likely to prove a means to accomplish these ends, it will contribute to the gratification of my desires. Soon after this, the Legislature, which had already incorporated the institution on a comprehensive basis, gave it the name of The College of Washington in Virginia. In the spirit of their beloved commander, The Cincinnati Society, composed of survivors of the Revolutionary war, on dissolving in 1803, donated their funds, amounting to nearly $25,000, to the institution which had received his patronage and bore his name; and, thus endowed, the College of Washington, went forward in a career which, for nearly threescore years and ten, was a period of uninterrupted usefulness, prosperity and honor. All ranks of honorable enterprise and ambition in this rising empire felt the impress of the noble spirits who came forth from its halls, trained and equipped for life's arduous tasks with keen
Comrades and Countrymen: There was no happier or lovelier home than that of Colonel Robert Edward Lee, in the spring of 1861, when for the first time its threshold was darkened with the omens of civil war. Crowning the green slopes of the Virgihreshold and doffed his sandal shoon. The antecedents of Colonel Lee. So situated was Colonel Lee in the spring of 1861, upon the verge of the momentous revolution, of which he became so mighty a pillar and so glorious a chieftain. But we cat them—bearing the censures of the impatient without a murmur, and careless of fame with duty done. Later, in the fall of 1861, we find him exercising his skill as an engineer in planning defences along the threatened coast of South Carolina; and ina hero who passed from these halls in the flush of youthful manhood, and has long slept with the unreturning brave; for in 1861, when the calls to arms resounded, The Liberty-Hall Volunteers—the students of Washington College—were among the first (an<
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