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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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January, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 60
d survive when the physical powers of nature have been exhausted. Like a rock of old ocean, it had received, and broken, and hurled back into the deep in bloody foam those swiftly succeeding waves of four years of incessant battle; but now the rock itself was wearing away, and still the waves came on. A new enemy was approaching the sturdy devoted band. In September, 1864, Atlanta fell, and through Georgia to the sea, with fire and sword, swept the victorious columns of Sherman. In January, 1865, the head of the column had been turned northward; and in February, Columbia and Charleston shared the fate that had already befallen Savannah. Yes, a new enemy was approaching the Army of Northern Virginia, and this time in the rear. The homes of the soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Southern States were now in ashes. Wives, mothers and sisters were wanderers under the wintry skies, flying from the invaders who smote and spared not in their relentless march. Is it w
April 9th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 60
from whom sprung two such sons—fortunate the army that always had a leader worthy of it—happy he who can transmit his place to one so well qualified to fill it—and happy likewise he who has had such predecessor to prepare the way for victory. General Lee in command of the Army of Northern Virginia—Richmond, Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg. On the 3d of June, 1862, General Lee was assigned to command in person the Army of Northern Virginia; and from that day to April 9th, 1865, nearly three years, he was at its head. And on the page of history now laid open are crowded schemes of war and feats of arms as brilliant as ever thrilled the soul of heroism and genius with admiration,—a page of history that feasted glory till pity cried, no more. Swift was Lee to plan, and swift to execute. Making a feint of reinforcing Jackson in the Valley, startling the Federal authorities with apprehensions of attack on the Potomac lines, and practically eliminating McDowe
August, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 60
on which adorned it was carried off as a trophy. Washington College was dismantled, its scientific apparatus destroyed, its library sacked, its every apartment pillaged. The hand of war indeed fell heavily here, and when the Southern cause went down at Appomattox, Washington College remained scarce more than a ruinous and desolate relic of better days. Four professors, a handful of students, and the bare buildings, were all that was left of it. President of Washington College. In August, 1865, the trustees of Washington College met. The situation they contemplated was deplorable and depressing. Their invested funds were unproductive. Their treasury was empty. The State was prostrate and bankrupt. In the sky of the future there was scarcely a ray of light. But they were resolved to face difficulties and to do the best they could. One of the trustees, Colonel Bolivar Christian of Staunton, suggested that General Lee be invited to accept the Presidency of the Institution.
October 20th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 60
ise General Lee of the fact. At first General Lee hesitated. He modestly distrusted his own competency to fulfill the trust, and he feared that the hostility of the government towards him might direct adverse influences against the Institution which it was proposed to commit to his care. These considerations being successfully combatted by those who knew how high his qualifications were, and how great were his attractions, General Lee accepted the position tendered him, and on the 20th of October, 1865, he appeared before the Rev. W. S. White— the oldest Christian minister of Lexington—took the oath of office, and assumed the duties of President of Washington College. On the eve of acceptance, two propositions were made to General Lee: one to become President of a large corporation, with a salary of $10,000 per annum; another to take the like office in another corporation, with a salary of $50,000. But he had made up his mind to come here, and this is what he said to a friend who b
be found, has fixed her temple only in the heart that is without guile, and is without reproach of man or woman. The last days of General Lee. Five years rolled by while here the self-imposed mission of Lee was being accomplished, and now in 1870, he had reached the age of sixty-three. A robust constitution, never abused by injurious habits, would doubtless have prolonged his life beyond the threescore years and ten which the Psalmist has ascribed as the allotted term of man; but many caudying pillow. Death. The particular form of his mortal malady was rheumatism of the heart, originating in the exposure of his campaigns, and aggravated by the circumstances of his many trying situations. He traveled South in the spring of 1870, and in the summer resorted to the Hot Springs of Virginia; and when September came, he was here in better health and spirits, at his accustomed work. On the 28th of September, he conducted, as usual, his correspondence, and performed the inciden
October 12th, 1870 AD (search for this): chapter 60
Introductory remarks. Friends, Comrades and Fellow-Citizens, Ladies and Gentlemen: The sickness of General Joseph E. Johnston, the distinguished President of the Lee Memorial Association, which prevents his attendance here, has devolved on me, as First Vice-President, the unexpected duty of presiding on this occasion; and I am sure no one can regret the cause of this change in the programme more than I do. The great commander of the Army of Northern Virginia died on the 12th of October, 1870, and as soon as his remains were consigned to the tomb a meeting of the citizens of Lexington was held and steps taken for the formation of an Association to erect a monument to his memory. More effectually to carry out that purpose an act of incorporation was obtained from the Legislature of Virginia on the 14th of January, 1871, by which certain gentlemen, most of whom were residents of Lexington, and such other persons as they should associate with themselves, were incorporated by
January 14th, 1871 AD (search for this): chapter 60
d I am sure no one can regret the cause of this change in the programme more than I do. The great commander of the Army of Northern Virginia died on the 12th of October, 1870, and as soon as his remains were consigned to the tomb a meeting of the citizens of Lexington was held and steps taken for the formation of an Association to erect a monument to his memory. More effectually to carry out that purpose an act of incorporation was obtained from the Legislature of Virginia on the 14th of January, 1871, by which certain gentlemen, most of whom were residents of Lexington, and such other persons as they should associate with themselves, were incorporated by the name and style of The Lee Memorial Association. Subsequently the Association was further organized by the appointment of General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, who had been the last Secretary of War of the Confederate States, as President, and of fifteen VicePresi-dents, as also a Treasurer—the nineteen persons named in t
November 29th, 1878 AD (search for this): chapter 60
istinguished Virginia artist was selected to execute in marble the recumbent figure, and years ago he completed his work in a manner that links his name forever with that of Lee. Upon the death of General Breckinridge General Joseph E. Johnston, the senior surviving officer of the Confederate army, and the predecessor of General Lee in command of that army, which, under the lead of the latter, became so renowned as the Army of Northern Virginia, was made the President. On the 29th of November, 1878, the corner stone of the mausoleum was laid, under the superintendence of a distinguished architect of Baltimore, who was charged with its construction. The requisite funds have been raised by great exertion, a large part having been contributed in small sums. The noble work has now been completed, and we are assembled here to perform the crowning act, in unveiling the recumbent figure of one of the grandest and noblest heroes, soldiers and patriots, who have figured in all the his
June 28th, 1883 AD (search for this): chapter 60
Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. Remarks of General Early—oration of Major John W. Daniel, Ll.D., of Va.—description of the ceremonies, &c. The occasion of the unveiling of Valentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in our records. General J. A. Early, First Vice-President of the Lee Memorial Association, presided on the occasion, called the vast assemblage to order, and called on the Rev. R. J. McBryde, of Lexington, who made an appropriate and fervent prayer. General Early then made the following Introductory remarks. Friends, Comrades and Fellow-Citizens, Ladies and Gentlemen: The sickness of General Joseph E. Johnston, the distinguished President of the Lee Memorial Association, which prevents his attendance here, has devolved on me, as First Vice-President, the unexpected duty of presiding on this occasion; and I am sure no one can regret the cause of
Archibald Alexander (search for this): chapter 60
en, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruffner (who presided here), and Socrates Maupin, of the University of Virginia. These are but a few of those who here garnered the learning that shed so gracious a light in the after-time on them, their country, and their Alma Mater. And could I pause to speak of those who became valiant leaders of men in battle I could name many a noble soldier whose eye greets mine to-day; and, alas!
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