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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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February 10th (search for this): chapter 1.13
t steamer Oreto. Bought in 1862 at Liverpool by the Confederates and mounted with five guns. She was boarded by the United States Ship Wachusett and captured in the harbor of Bahai, Brazil, October 7, 1864, while her captain and crew were ashore on liberty. Forrest-Wooden tug-boat formerly the Edwards, bought at Norfolk in 1861 and mounted with two guns. She was disabled in battle at Roanoke Island. February 7, 1862, and was burned on the ways at Elizabeth City by the Confederates, February 10th. Fredericksburg—Iron-clad, four guns. Built at Richmond, 1863, and burned by the Confederates at the evacuation of that city, April, 1865. Gaines —Side-wheel merchant stealer, mounted six guns. Sunk in battle of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. Germantown—Sailing sloop of war, twenty-two guns. Seized by Confederates at Gosport Navy Yard, 1861, and burned at the evacuation of Norfolk. Georgia—Iron-clad floating battery at Savannah. Destroyed by the Confederates at the fall of
February 12th (search for this): chapter 1.35
aw they had us, so after a few minutes Howell retired. Bartow followed him and I followed Bartow. I was told that no other word was spoken after we retired. When we reached the capitol, we heard that Georgia had presented Mr. Stephens. We placed ourselves right and then let it rock on. Stephens was very anxious to accept in a public speech at 1 o'clock to-day. The crowd of presidents in embryo was very large. I believe the Government could be stocked with offices from among them. February 12.—I am hard at work on three committees, each of which is charged with important business. I tried to get the name of this republic the Republic of Washington, but failed. The name now had, Confederate States of America, does not give satisfaction, and I have no doubt will be changed for the permanent Constitution. I am disgusted with old Withers, of South Carolina. Rhett is a generous-hearted man, with a quantity of cranks. Barnwell is a gentlemanly man, full of politeness and modest
February 13th (search for this): chapter 1.35
point of death. January 28.—Among the guests at Toombs' I met Prince Polignac who holds a commission as lieutenant-colonel in our army. He seems to be a clever little fellow, but lowers ones opinion considerably of a Prince of one of the noblest houses of France. February 2.—General Longstreet buried his third child to-day, a boy of twelve summers—all victim's of scarlet fever. Although a stranger to him I felt acutely which carried me to join my sorrow with his stricken heart. February 13. Lanier, who kept the hotel at Athens, was taken prisoner at Hatteras and died in Fort Warren. The New York Herald says the rebellion must be crushed in the next thirty days or the Northern government is bankrupt. If so we may expect a struggle by McClellan at every point. The spring campaign will evidently settle the issue of this war. March 16.—Davis vetoed the bill making a commanding general yesterday on constitutional grounds and it is raising a perfect storm in Congress. I
February 14th (search for this): chapter 1.22
oint the officers therein provided to be appointed in and for said Territory: Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this, my proclamation, declaring said Act to organize the Territory of Arizona to be in full force and operation, and that I have proceeded to appoint the officers therein provided to be appointed in and for said Territory. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States of America, at Richmond, this 14th day of February, A. D. 1862. By the President: (Seal.) Jefferson Davis. R. M. T. Hunter, Secretary of War. So much now for the facts of the Territory of Arizona, as to being created and organized by and under the government of the Confederate States of America. In the next year, 1863, on the 24th day of February, it appears that the Congress of the United States, in session in Washington city, followed the Congress of the Confederate States and passed an act to establish and organize th
February 15th (search for this): chapter 1.35
his republic the Republic of Washington, but failed. The name now had, Confederate States of America, does not give satisfaction, and I have no doubt will be changed for the permanent Constitution. I am disgusted with old Withers, of South Carolina. Rhett is a generous-hearted man, with a quantity of cranks. Barnwell is a gentlemanly man, full of politeness and modesty, and attracts my kind feeling. Memminger is very shrewd—a perfect Mc-Coy metamorphosed into a legislating lawyer. February 15.—I am sick at heart with the daily manifestations of selfishness, intrigue, low cunning and meanness among those who at this critical moment should have an eye single to the protection of their people. * * * The best friends of the Confederacy here are troubled at these continued rumors of President Davis being a reconstructionist. Many are regretting already his election. If he does not come out boldly in his inaugural against this suicidal policy we shall have an explosion here, t
February 16th (search for this): chapter 1.35
le to the protection of their people. * * * The best friends of the Confederacy here are troubled at these continued rumors of President Davis being a reconstructionist. Many are regretting already his election. If he does not come out boldly in his inaugural against this suicidal policy we shall have an explosion here, the end of which I cannot foretell. The most troublesome matters with us arise from the Forts Sumter and Pickens. Whenever a policy is settled I will write you. February 16.—Stephens and Ben Hill have made friends and are as thick as brothers. When in Milledgeville a proposition for peace was made to Stephens, his reply was If Mr. Hill will acknowledge that he told a lie as he did, then I will speak to him. I have received a long letter from Mitchell urging me to put in the claim of Athens for the capital of the Southern Confederacy. I have had a hint of the Attorney-Generalship. I should promptly and unconditionally decline it if offered. The cabinet
February 17th (search for this): chapter 1.35
I will speak to him. I have received a long letter from Mitchell urging me to put in the claim of Athens for the capital of the Southern Confederacy. I have had a hint of the Attorney-Generalship. I should promptly and unconditionally decline it if offered. The cabinet is beyond conjecture. Toombs is spoken of for the State department, but says he would not have it. Yancey and Benjamin have also been named but I think no one has the slightest intimation of the President's views. February 17.—I have stuck to my homespun ever since I have been here. The President arrived here in a suit of homespun. I hope he will be inaugurated in it. February 18.—The inaugural pleased everybody and the manner in which President Davis took the oath was most impressive. The scene was one worth seeing and I regret more than ever that Sally and Callie were not here. I have not yet called on the President. I hate anything that looks like toadyism. We signed the enrolled constitution to-
February 18th (search for this): chapter 1.35
ad a hint of the Attorney-Generalship. I should promptly and unconditionally decline it if offered. The cabinet is beyond conjecture. Toombs is spoken of for the State department, but says he would not have it. Yancey and Benjamin have also been named but I think no one has the slightest intimation of the President's views. February 17.—I have stuck to my homespun ever since I have been here. The President arrived here in a suit of homespun. I hope he will be inaugurated in it. February 18.—The inaugural pleased everybody and the manner in which President Davis took the oath was most impressive. The scene was one worth seeing and I regret more than ever that Sally and Callie were not here. I have not yet called on the President. I hate anything that looks like toadyism. We signed the enrolled constitution to-day and I have preserved my pen to be laid up again as an heir-loom for my children. They will have but few such memories of me. February 19.—The President ha<
February 19th (search for this): chapter 1.35
gurated in it. February 18.—The inaugural pleased everybody and the manner in which President Davis took the oath was most impressive. The scene was one worth seeing and I regret more than ever that Sally and Callie were not here. I have not yet called on the President. I hate anything that looks like toadyism. We signed the enrolled constitution to-day and I have preserved my pen to be laid up again as an heir-loom for my children. They will have but few such memories of me. February 19.—The President had a grand levee last night. Everybody and his wife were there, except me. I stayed in my room and worked hard on bills until past 1 o'clock. Various rumors are abroad about the cabinet. Mr. Memminger will probably be Secretary of the Treasury. The firm conviction here is that Great Britain, France and Russia will acknowledge us at once in the family of nations. As to the North, the 4th of March will determine its policy. February 20.—The exciting question now is, W<
February 20th (search for this): chapter 1.35
but few such memories of me. February 19.—The President had a grand levee last night. Everybody and his wife were there, except me. I stayed in my room and worked hard on bills until past 1 o'clock. Various rumors are abroad about the cabinet. Mr. Memminger will probably be Secretary of the Treasury. The firm conviction here is that Great Britain, France and Russia will acknowledge us at once in the family of nations. As to the North, the 4th of March will determine its policy. February 20.—The exciting question now is, Who will constitute the cabinet? It is understood that Yancey is to be Attorney-General, Captain Bragg, Secretary of War, and Toombs, Secretary of the Treasury. The State portfolio was offered to Barnwell and declined by him—so says Keitt. From five to twenty letters come to me every day, begging for office. Gwynn, of California, writes that Seward told him there would be no war. February 22.—President Davis dines at our table every day. He is chatt
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