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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones).

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February 22nd (search for this): chapter 1.35
to the North, the 4th of March will determine its policy. February 20.—The exciting question now is, Who will constitute the cabinet? It is understood that Yancey is to be Attorney-General, Captain Bragg, Secretary of War, and Toombs, Secretary of the Treasury. The State portfolio was offered to Barnwell and declined by him—so says Keitt. From five to twenty letters come to me every day, begging for office. Gwynn, of California, writes that Seward told him there would be no war. February 22.—President Davis dines at our table every day. He is chatty and tries to be agreeable. He is not great in any sense of the term. The power of will he has, made him all he is. February 26.—An act was passed this morning, giving to each of the commissioners to Europe $12,000 per annum. Yancey and Slidell are both mentioned. Henry R. Jackson is also spoken of, but Mr. Davis acts for himself and receives no advice, except from those who press their advice unasked. February 27.—H
February 24th (search for this): chapter 1.22
d to appoint the officers therein provided to be appointed in and for said Territory. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States of America, at Richmond, this 14th day of February, A. D. 1862. By the President: (Seal.) Jefferson Davis. R. M. T. Hunter, Secretary of War. So much now for the facts of the Territory of Arizona, as to being created and organized by and under the government of the Confederate States of America. In the next year, 1863, on the 24th day of February, it appears that the Congress of the United States, in session in Washington city, followed the Congress of the Confederate States and passed an act to establish and organize the Territory of Arizona, formerly a part of the Territory of New Mexico. The name, as will be observed, is the same as that of the Confederate Territory. See the United States Statutes-at-Large, volume twelve, page 664, or Revised Statutes of the United States, edition of 1878, page 335. It appears in the abov
February 25th (search for this): chapter 1.15
of the South had formed a powerful combination, there arose another sceptre, powerful in resources of men, arms, munitions and wealth, which, if directed against the Union, simultaneously with the blow from the South, would have crushed it, and, instead of one Union, inseparable forever, the map of the United States would to-day show at least three, if not more, combinations of States. Mr. Wright, in his report to Mr. Crawford, President of the Georgia convention, says: On the 25th of February (1861), I visited for the third time Annapolis, the seat of government (having failed, while there on a former visit on the 21st, to meet the Executive), and waited upon Governor Hicks, and after a personal interview and pretty free interchange of opinion with His Excellency, I handed to him the ordinance of secession with which I was entrusted, and also a written communication, in which I endeavored to justify and explain the action of the State of Georgia, and attempted to show that t
February 26th (search for this): chapter 1.35
Captain Bragg, Secretary of War, and Toombs, Secretary of the Treasury. The State portfolio was offered to Barnwell and declined by him—so says Keitt. From five to twenty letters come to me every day, begging for office. Gwynn, of California, writes that Seward told him there would be no war. February 22.—President Davis dines at our table every day. He is chatty and tries to be agreeable. He is not great in any sense of the term. The power of will he has, made him all he is. February 26.—An act was passed this morning, giving to each of the commissioners to Europe $12,000 per annum. Yancey and Slidell are both mentioned. Henry R. Jackson is also spoken of, but Mr. Davis acts for himself and receives no advice, except from those who press their advice unasked. February 27.—Henry Jackson stands no chance, for Stephens has the ear of Davis, and he will not forgive Henry soon. March 1.—I declined two invitations to tea last night, and went to prayer-meeting instea
February 27th (search for this): chapter 1.35
r. February 22.—President Davis dines at our table every day. He is chatty and tries to be agreeable. He is not great in any sense of the term. The power of will he has, made him all he is. February 26.—An act was passed this morning, giving to each of the commissioners to Europe $12,000 per annum. Yancey and Slidell are both mentioned. Henry R. Jackson is also spoken of, but Mr. Davis acts for himself and receives no advice, except from those who press their advice unasked. February 27.—Henry Jackson stands no chance, for Stephens has the ear of Davis, and he will not forgive Henry soon. March 1.—I declined two invitations to tea last night, and went to prayer-meeting instead, and from my heart I thank God that I went. It was a small company, but we were all melted to tears, and our Lord and Saviour was with us. It was good for us to be there. After the prayer-meeting my friend, Atticus Haygood came to my room, and we had a good religious talk. Yesterday I offere
stated above, when we left our camp and started from the green and now peaceful hills in front of Fredericksburg. Our soldiers were in the best of spirits, and the implicit confidence reposed in our officers and the justness of the cause combined to make heroes of even the most timid. And this confidence was fully shared in by the Confederate government, as was proven by the withdrawal of nearly all the troops around Richmond, and Lee's march far away into the enemy's territory. On the March. After cooking three days rations, the Crenshaw Battery moved out in the main road leading to Hamilton's Crossing, where we were joined by the other companies of Pegram's Battalion, and our march was then begun in earnest. We first crossed the river at Kelly's Ford, which place had already become famous on account of the numerous cavalry fights which had in part been settled there, prominent among which was the battle of the 17th of March, 1863, in which the gallant and much lamented you
great in any sense of the term. The power of will he has, made him all he is. February 26.—An act was passed this morning, giving to each of the commissioners to Europe $12,000 per annum. Yancey and Slidell are both mentioned. Henry R. Jackson is also spoken of, but Mr. Davis acts for himself and receives no advice, except from those who press their advice unasked. February 27.—Henry Jackson stands no chance, for Stephens has the ear of Davis, and he will not forgive Henry soon. March 1.—I declined two invitations to tea last night, and went to prayer-meeting instead, and from my heart I thank God that I went. It was a small company, but we were all melted to tears, and our Lord and Saviour was with us. It was good for us to be there. After the prayer-meeting my friend, Atticus Haygood came to my room, and we had a good religious talk. Yesterday I offered a bill closing our courts to Northern plaintiffs, and I intend to introduce a bill granting international copyright <
om, and we had a good religious talk. Yesterday I offered a bill closing our courts to Northern plaintiffs, and I intend to introduce a bill granting international copyright privileges to the authors of France and Great Britain. I am worn out and homesick and starved, and from my heart I can say I am sorry I ever came here. File this letter away, and read it to me whenever hereafter the silly notion takes my head that my services are peculiarly necessary to the safety of the republic. March 3.—Last night I was summoned to the room of the President. He informed me that he had just received a telegram from Arkansas bringing a Macedonian cry for help; that on consultation they had agreed that I of all others could do most to save that State at this crisis; that a State hung on my appointment as envoy to the State of Arkansas and he begged me to go at once as the convention meets to-morrow. I confess I was nonplussed. I protested against the appointment and gave him three objecti
ious rumors are abroad about the cabinet. Mr. Memminger will probably be Secretary of the Treasury. The firm conviction here is that Great Britain, France and Russia will acknowledge us at once in the family of nations. As to the North, the 4th of March will determine its policy. February 20.—The exciting question now is, Who will constitute the cabinet? It is understood that Yancey is to be Attorney-General, Captain Bragg, Secretary of War, and Toombs, Secretary of the Treasury. The Stas which were altogether insurmountable. We shall adopt a flag to-morrow and raise it on the capitol at 12 o'clock, the hour when Lincoln is to be inaugurated. Our news from Virginia is more promising, but I have no hope of her coming now. March 4.—The question of pay to members is being discussed. It will settle down on $8 per day and 10 cents mileage. This will pay me the enormous sum of $300 for which I have lost I doubt not in my private business $3,000. I am urging Congress to take
re promising, but I have no hope of her coming now. March 4.—The question of pay to members is being discussed. It will settle down on $8 per day and 10 cents mileage. This will pay me the enormous sum of $300 for which I have lost I doubt not in my private business $3,000. I am urging Congress to take no pay and set an example of patriotism. The nomination of Mr. Mallory as Secretary of the Navy was confirmed after a struggle. His soundness on the secession question was doubted. March 5.—The President appealed to me again to go to Arkansas but I positively refused. This morning he and Mrs. Davis took their seats by me at the breakfast table and were very affable. A telegram from Washington City just received says the universal feeling there since Lincoln's inaugural is that war must come. I don't believe it yet, though I confess the document is a bolder announcement of coercion than I had expected. Well, I am not afraid of the issue. Last night we passed a bill rais
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