hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Ellen M. Wright 60 0 Browse Search
Winter Hill (Wyoming, United States) 46 0 Browse Search
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) 42 0 Browse Search
Guy C. Hawkins 34 0 Browse Search
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Charles Forster 25 3 Browse Search
Charles D. Elliot 24 4 Browse Search
Frank Mortimer Hawes 23 1 Browse Search
John Tufts 23 1 Browse Search
Chester Adams 22 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907.

Found 2,696 total hits in 1,687 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
secretary of the board in place of Mr. Jackson, who was ill. Samuel Bigelow is still teacher of the school at the Neck. Voted that salaries for teachers of summer schools outside the Neck shall not exceed the sums allowed last year, and that the length of the term be the same, twenty weeks. Voted to pay the primary teachers a salary of $225 each. The trustees also considered the expediency of allowing the female scholars in the primary schools to practice needle work. Of bills approved in May, Cornelius Walker received $200, Samuel Barrett, $151.88 (teacher of the Female school), and Peter Conant, $200. Thursday, September 21, 1826, the ward 4 school under Miss Knight was examined by Messrs. Kelley and Phipps. The school is in a condition to deserve their unqualified disapprobation. They made an attempt to visit school No. 5, kept by Miss Frost, but owing to a want of punctuality on their part in regard to the hour assigned for it, they found the schoolhouse closed and consequ
ngham is authorized, July 25, to commence prosecution against boys for engaging in breaking the glass in the Neck schoolhouse. October 4 it is recorded that smallpox has appeared in town and threatens to spread in some of the primary departments. Consequently it is voted that no scholar be allowed to attend any of the public schools after to-morrow who has not been vaccinated. This order was rescinded December 26. Voted that Election vacation stand as formerly, viz., the last week in May and the first Monday in June. Miss Gates and Miss Jaquith, of the primary teachers, resigned this year. February 2, 1832, the resignation of Samuel Bigelow, of the Neck school, Was accepted, also that of Reuben Swan, of the Female Writing school, both having entered other occupations. The salary of the former was $600, of the latter $500. Moses W. Walker, of the Winter Hill school, was elected to the Neck school, and Thomas Stephenson to succeed Mr. Swan. As Mr. Stephenson's health was de
and that the district schools be allowed a vacation every Wednesday afternoon during the summer. Voted that the form of Register received from the secretary of the Board of Education be adopted, and that the teachers begin with it the first of June, 1838. Voted that the board attend the convention at Lowell Monday, July 27, and that teachers of the grammar schools be invited to attend with us. Voted that a male teacher be elected for Winter Hill, to begin September 1, and continue until May 1. James Hovey received the appointment. Amos F. Allen was elected to the Prospect Hill school, Levi (should be Philemon R.) Russell to the Russell school, William R. Bagnall to Gardner Row, and Joel Pierce to the Milk Row school. November 15, 1838, an attempt was made to arrange the boundaries between the Bunker Hill and Winter Hill districts. This is the first time I find mention of a Bunker Hill district. March 18, 1839, the trustees passed a vote that the Neck school hereafter be ca
y compels us to ask an appropriation of $200 for the repair of the schoolhouse in the Russell district. The building has not been repaired since its erection: the seats and benches are in bad condition, and the whole interior needs refitting. 1838-1839. The teachers of the district schools this season were: Mary W. J. Evans, of the Gardner; Clara D. Whittemore, of the Russell; Sarah M. Burnham, of Milk Row; Elizabeth P. Whittredge, of Prospect Hill; and Abby Mead, of Winter Hill road. May 9 Mr. Forster was authorized to procure a teacher until Miss Mead is able to take charge. Miss Ellen A. Damon was elected to this position June 11. These schools were assigned to the care of Messrs. Allen and Underwood for the trustees. They gave permission to children contiguous to the Neck who wished to attend the Neck school. It was they who had charge of the repairs made during the summer at the Russell school. It was voted that the summer vacations this year be the first week in June
trustees had expressed the belief that accomplished female teachers would keep the two district schools in a steady state of progress, and recommended that these two schools be made annual schools. This was so voted, and November 21 Miss Charlotte Reynolds was selected for the Gardner district, at a salary of $225. Levi Russell was elected for the winter term in his home district. Messrs. Forster and Sanborn, a committee for estimating the cost of a new building on Winter Hill, reported May 11 that Mr. Charles Adams will give to the town a piece of land 30x40 feet, on condition that a school be built forthwith. This report was accepted, and it was voted to build a house in all respects like one recently built on Elm street, the cost, with fences and outhouses, not to exceed the amount appropriated by the town ($500). Vacation this year is to be the same as last year the first week in June and from the 17th to the 29 August, inclusive,— and the following days, 17 June, 4 July,
e manners and morals of the community around them. The building is badly constructed and much crowded. The standard of public education is undoubtedly rising in consequence of the establishment of the primary schools. The number in the primary grades is 476, in the grammar and writing schools, 632. The estimated current expense is $6,500. Signed by Benjamin Whipple, Secretary. 1827-28. The schools without the Neck were put under the charge of Messrs. Kelley and J. Stearns Hurd, and May 19, Miss Ann E. Whipple was assigned to the Milk Row school. The committee to whom was referred the subject of alterations and repairs on the schoolhouses beyond the Neck, reported (May 25) that it appeared upon examination that the house at Milk Row had been cleared of its desks, benches, etc., by Mr. Kelley, and that a new arrangement of the same had been commenced by him, the exact plan of which they had not ascertained, and that the work was suspended by your committee until they should rec
blishment of the primary schools. The number in the primary grades is 476, in the grammar and writing schools, 632. The estimated current expense is $6,500. Signed by Benjamin Whipple, Secretary. 1827-28. The schools without the Neck were put under the charge of Messrs. Kelley and J. Stearns Hurd, and May 19, Miss Ann E. Whipple was assigned to the Milk Row school. The committee to whom was referred the subject of alterations and repairs on the schoolhouses beyond the Neck, reported (May 25) that it appeared upon examination that the house at Milk Row had been cleared of its desks, benches, etc., by Mr. Kelley, and that a new arrangement of the same had been commenced by him, the exact plan of which they had not ascertained, and that the work was suspended by your committee until they should receive further order from the board. It is the opinion of your committee that the schoolhouse at Winter Hill may be made convenient and comfortable by merely placing the desks farther apa
ote of the town, Messrs. Warren and Valentine were requested to look up the law relating to the establishment of high schools. February 23, 1837, they reported in favor of such a school, and their report was presented at the next town meeting. The formation of a new district school in Milk Row by a division of the district, as referred to the trustees by the town, was next referred to Messrs. Allen and Underwood as a special committee to consider the matter and report later. They found, May 30, that the number of scholars warrants a division of said district, commencing at a point in the Russell district, thence running easterly south of John Tufts' house to the south side of the wind mill on Prospect Hill; thence northeast of the house of William Bonner, embracing in the present district the houses of Ephraim Hill and Charles Miller; thence from said Miller's to Cambridge line, west of Charles Wait's house. Exertions have been made to find suitable accommodations for a school b
instructed not to allow the children of John Runey to remain at the school unless he consents to be set off from Winter Hill to Prospect Hill district. In regard to a petition of the teachers within the Neck for a vacation of the first week in June, as Boston teachers have, it was voted inexpedient. The teachers for the winter term outside the peninsula were: W. S. Wiley, of the Gardner school; Levi Russell, of the Russell school: David Curtis, of the Winter Hill; Joel Pierce, of the Milkgave permission to children contiguous to the Neck who wished to attend the Neck school. It was they who had charge of the repairs made during the summer at the Russell school. It was voted that the summer vacations this year be the first week in June and the last two weeks in August, and that the district schools be allowed a vacation every Wednesday afternoon during the summer. Voted that the form of Register received from the secretary of the Board of Education be adopted, and that the teac
Sanborn, a committee for estimating the cost of a new building on Winter Hill, reported May 11 that Mr. Charles Adams will give to the town a piece of land 30x40 feet, on condition that a school be built forthwith. This report was accepted, and it was voted to build a house in all respects like one recently built on Elm street, the cost, with fences and outhouses, not to exceed the amount appropriated by the town ($500). Vacation this year is to be the same as last year the first week in June and from the 17th to the 29 August, inclusive,— and the following days, 17 June, 4 July, Thanksgiving Day, with the Friday and Saturday following, Christmas Day; and no other days to be allowed except by special vote of the town. The number of children in town June 29, 1840, between four and sixteen years is 2,619, the census being taken by the assessors, James K. Frothingham, William H. Bacon, Fitch Cutter. Voted September 29, that teachers must be residents of the town during their te
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...