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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907.

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had charge of the repairs made during the summer at the Russell school. It was voted that the summer vacations this year be the first week in June and the last two weeks in August, and that the district schools be allowed a vacation every Wednesday afternoon during the summer. Voted that the form of Register received from the secretary of the Board of Education be adopted, and that the teachers begin with it the first of June, 1838. Voted that the board attend the convention at Lowell Monday, July 27, and that teachers of the grammar schools be invited to attend with us. Voted that a male teacher be elected for Winter Hill, to begin September 1, and continue until May 1. James Hovey received the appointment. Amos F. Allen was elected to the Prospect Hill school, Levi (should be Philemon R.) Russell to the Russell school, William R. Bagnall to Gardner Row, and Joel Pierce to the Milk Row school. November 15, 1838, an attempt was made to arrange the boundaries between the Bun
is divided into four classes, sub-divisions to be left to the teacher. The holidays shall be Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; Election Day in January; Fast Day and the day after examinations in April; Monday, June 1, and June 17; July 4; in August, the time of meeting of the American Institute of Instruction and the day bf Commencement at Harvard; the day after examinations in October; Thanksgiving Day; Christmas Day. These rules are to, be enforced in the schools outside the Neck so far iguous to the Neck who wished to attend the Neck school. It was they who had charge of the repairs made during the summer at the Russell school. It was voted that the summer vacations this year be the first week in June and the last two weeks in August, and that the district schools be allowed a vacation every Wednesday afternoon during the summer. Voted that the form of Register received from the secretary of the Board of Education be adopted, and that the teachers begin with it the first of
August 12th (search for this): chapter 14
proved by the auditing committee. The report says: The former schoolroom at Prospect Hill has been fitted up in such a manner as to make it one of the most desirable in town, having seats with backs, and raised as they recede from the desk of the master; and an addition has been made for the accommodation of the primary school. The cumbrous desks have been removed from the Milk Row and Winter Hill schoolhouses, and these have been fitted up for the better accommodation of the primaries. August 12, voted to let the teachers dismiss their schools Wednesday next, to attend the examination of schools in Boston on that day. September 30 we have the first mention of the Prospect Hill grammar school, which is to be opened Monday, November 4, also the primary school there the same day; the salary of the master to be $600, payable quarterly. October 14 Cornelius M. Vinson was elected the teacher of this school, and December 30 a clock was voted for his schoolroom. The spring examinati
August 16th (search for this): chapter 14
within the peninsula are noted. Lewis B. Munro and John A. Sanborn are made pupil teachers at the Winthrop school, with a salary of $50 each. Lydia W. Locke, of primary school No. 16 is succeeded August 30 by Hannah S. Austin. Previous to this date, Jane M. Burckes, a primary teacher, is mentioned, and later in the year Charlotte Bracket is appointed to primary school No. 21. The number of children in town from four to sixteen on May 1, 1841, was 2,719. The summer vacation was from August 16 to August 30. Teachers of primary schools hereafter are to be allowed $2 per year for building fires, but nothing is to be allowed for sweeping. The trustees assigned to outside schools (beyond the Neck) were: Messrs. Magoun and Francis Bowman to the Russell and Gardner districts, and Messrs. Allen and Bowman to the Prospect Hill grammar. No. 17 was under Mr. Bowman's supervision, No. 18 under Mr. Magoun, and Nos. 19 and 20 under Mr. Allen. February 28, 1842, an invitation to the b
August 17th (search for this): chapter 11
nd Miss Sarah M. Burnham, of the Winter Hill school. Teachers in these schools were informed, through Mr. Underwood, that they were to teach on Wednesday afternoons as heretofore. It seems that a petition had been circulated in favor of the half-holiday, but the parents objected to it. The compensation for keeping fires and sweeping at Milk Row, Prospect Hill, and Winter Hill was fixed at twenty cents per week. This year, 1837, we have the first mention of an annual vacation, to begin August 17 and to continue to September 1. About this time the trustees voted to consider the advisability of discarding the New Testament as a reading book for the second class in the primary grades. Voted that teachers be allowed to sell books and stationery to their scholars. Messrs. Warren and Underwood were authorized to examine Miss E. H. Dodge, one of the primary teachers, to see how often she had dismissed without leave and how often she had left her school in charge of another person. A
August 29th (search for this): chapter 14
ing the cost of a new building on Winter Hill, reported May 11 that Mr. Charles Adams will give to the town a piece of land 30x40 feet, on condition that a school be built forthwith. This report was accepted, and it was voted to build a house in all respects like one recently built on Elm street, the cost, with fences and outhouses, not to exceed the amount appropriated by the town ($500). Vacation this year is to be the same as last year the first week in June and from the 17th to the 29 August, inclusive,— and the following days, 17 June, 4 July, Thanksgiving Day, with the Friday and Saturday following, Christmas Day; and no other days to be allowed except by special vote of the town. The number of children in town June 29, 1840, between four and sixteen years is 2,619, the census being taken by the assessors, James K. Frothingham, William H. Bacon, Fitch Cutter. Voted September 29, that teachers must be residents of the town during their term of service. Charles Kimball,
August 30th (search for this): chapter 14
per month. Only a few references to teachers within the peninsula are noted. Lewis B. Munro and John A. Sanborn are made pupil teachers at the Winthrop school, with a salary of $50 each. Lydia W. Locke, of primary school No. 16 is succeeded August 30 by Hannah S. Austin. Previous to this date, Jane M. Burckes, a primary teacher, is mentioned, and later in the year Charlotte Bracket is appointed to primary school No. 21. The number of children in town from four to sixteen on May 1, 1841, was 2,719. The summer vacation was from August 16 to August 30. Teachers of primary schools hereafter are to be allowed $2 per year for building fires, but nothing is to be allowed for sweeping. The trustees assigned to outside schools (beyond the Neck) were: Messrs. Magoun and Francis Bowman to the Russell and Gardner districts, and Messrs. Allen and Bowman to the Prospect Hill grammar. No. 17 was under Mr. Bowman's supervision, No. 18 under Mr. Magoun, and Nos. 19 and 20 under Mr. Alle
September (search for this): chapter 6
illing to work should, without his aid or prompting, effect the other organizations. Such help was not forthcoming; and his last Forest Festival, held, I think, in 1885, the year of his death, had for its object so to strengthen his little Fells Association as to help him in gaining this help. In 1885, too, by his invitation, the National Forestry Congress was held in Boston. Towards its success, and still that of similar forest parks for other cities, he made every effort. This Was in September, and feeling his strength lessen, his work till the morning of his death was to see such men as he hoped after it might take his place. And on November 21 he died, bequeathing to the Metropolitan plan the success his own had earned, land with it, through the love of his children, the beautiful woods of Pine Hill and its neighborhood. After quoting the passage which I have given, and which was written in the July of 1883, Mr. De las Casas takes leave of Mr. Wright with, His death was th
ead, at Winter Hill; Manda (Miranda) Whittemore, at the Russell, and Mary W. Jeffurds at the Gardner districts. Miss Jeffurds is allowed to keep some private scholars not exceeding six, and to receive compensation there from. Messrs. Runey and Hawkins are empowered to attend to the schools outside the Neck, the same as last year. They engage for the winter term Miles Gardner, for the Gardner school; Elliot Valentine, for Winter Hill; and Joseph S. Hastings, for the Russell district. In September Mr. Walker resigned at the Neck, to go to the Hawes school, South Boston, and Amos P. Baker was elected to succeed him. The death of Mr. Baker was reported December 20, and Aaron D. Capen was placed over this school. Through Amos Tufts and David Devens, Esq., executors of the will of Deacon Thomas Miller, the trustees received $100, the income of Which was to be used for the schools. Voted that the school recess shall not exceed ten minutes; that the trustees supply Mr. Fairbanks' scho
September 1st (search for this): chapter 11
ted to it. The compensation for keeping fires and sweeping at Milk Row, Prospect Hill, and Winter Hill was fixed at twenty cents per week. This year, 1837, we have the first mention of an annual vacation, to begin August 17 and to continue to September 1. About this time the trustees voted to consider the advisability of discarding the New Testament as a reading book for the second class in the primary grades. Voted that teachers be allowed to sell books and stationery to their scholars. Min with it the first of June, 1838. Voted that the board attend the convention at Lowell Monday, July 27, and that teachers of the grammar schools be invited to attend with us. Voted that a male teacher be elected for Winter Hill, to begin September 1, and continue until May 1. James Hovey received the appointment. Amos F. Allen was elected to the Prospect Hill school, Levi (should be Philemon R.) Russell to the Russell school, William R. Bagnall to Gardner Row, and Joel Pierce to the Mil
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