hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 895 3 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 584 4 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 457 3 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 456 2 Browse Search
Richard W. Meade 366 0 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 366 0 Browse Search
James Longstreet 344 2 Browse Search
Pemberton 320 4 Browse Search
Richard S. Ewell 307 1 Browse Search
John Buford 298 2 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). Search the whole document.

Found 6,573 total hits in 582 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
of the Democratic party found themselves, in the mean while, in the situation, painful for sincere patriots, of all oppositions which lay aside their arms in times of war. The disaster of Fredericksburg, the check of Chickasaw Bayou, the inaction of Rosecrans after Murfreesborough, were so many political victories for their cause. The vote of three Northeastern States—where the Republicans, hitherto all-powerful, had considerable trouble in electing their candidates—showed in the months of March and April what progress the Democratic party had made. Shortly afterward the arrest and banishment of Mr. Vallandigham caused a greater excitement throughout the country, inasmuch as these acts of summary justice were coincident with the defeat at Chancellorsville. Finally, to all these causes of discontent were added the preliminary operations of the conscription law. All those who were opposed to the war either from conviction or interest, those even who approved it, but on condition of
March 3rd (search for this): chapter 4
bruary, three days before the closing of the session, and promulgated on the 3d of March, it had the effect of a political bequest from the Thirty-seventh Congress. expired on the 30th of June, 1863, and, as Congress was to adjourn from the 3d of March to the 8th of December, to make the estimates meet the wants of the ensuing $100,000,000 to pay the arrears due to the soldiers. But it was only on the 3d of March, just as it was about to adjourn, that Congress voted the laws required by tar, were commonly known by the name of ten-forties. But at this date, the 3d of March, the arrears amounted to $72,171,189: they increased much more rapidly than had been taken up; there yet remained $476,250,000 to be disposed of on the 3d of March. Out of this amount we have apportioned $35,000,000 to the resources which f all the arms procured in Europe. Among the numerous laws enacted on the 3d of March by the Thirty-seventh Congress a few hours previous to adjournment was one o
March 19th (search for this): chapter 4
il, which, through a fatal shortsighted policy, was still worked so as to be made to yield products which were thenceforth useless. The armies were at times short of provisions. The most important places, like Vicksburg, were insufficiently supplied with food. Finally, disturbances among women who were clamoring for bread—disturbances which were directed, as always happens everywhere under similar circumstances, against monopolists—broke out first at Salisbury in North Carolina on the 19th of March and at Raleigh on the 26th; then even at Richmond on the 2d of April, and on the 15th at Mobile. In order to ward off the evil, at least for the future, the government conceived the idea of prohibiting the cultivation of the soil except for cereals. It was guided, however, by its advisers. On the 10th of April, Mr. Davis through an official proclamation appealed to the patriotism of all planters, conjuring them to devote themselves exclusively to the production of articles of food: t
April 2nd (search for this): chapter 4
to be made to yield products which were thenceforth useless. The armies were at times short of provisions. The most important places, like Vicksburg, were insufficiently supplied with food. Finally, disturbances among women who were clamoring for bread—disturbances which were directed, as always happens everywhere under similar circumstances, against monopolists—broke out first at Salisbury in North Carolina on the 19th of March and at Raleigh on the 26th; then even at Richmond on the 2d of April, and on the 15th at Mobile. In order to ward off the evil, at least for the future, the government conceived the idea of prohibiting the cultivation of the soil except for cereals. It was guided, however, by its advisers. On the 10th of April, Mr. Davis through an official proclamation appealed to the patriotism of all planters, conjuring them to devote themselves exclusively to the production of articles of food: the local authorities followed his example. This appeal was the more t
April 10th (search for this): chapter 4
for bread—disturbances which were directed, as always happens everywhere under similar circumstances, against monopolists—broke out first at Salisbury in North Carolina on the 19th of March and at Raleigh on the 26th; then even at Richmond on the 2d of April, and on the 15th at Mobile. In order to ward off the evil, at least for the future, the government conceived the idea of prohibiting the cultivation of the soil except for cereals. It was guided, however, by its advisers. On the 10th of April, Mr. Davis through an official proclamation appealed to the patriotism of all planters, conjuring them to devote themselves exclusively to the production of articles of food: the local authorities followed his example. This appeal was the more thoroughly appreciated inasmuch as the change in the cultivation of the soil so persistently demanded was, so to say, rendered imperative by the laws of political economy. The culture of the soil had necessarily to be adapted to the wants of cons
d in which the latter could render the greatest services. From the beginning of May there was formed in the principal cities of the Union, and especially in New Yorinally, the arrival of a large number of recruits, had during the latter part of May carried its effective force to eighty thousand men, 68,352 of whom were infantry their terms of service carried off five thousand well-tried men in the month of May, and ten thousand in June; the fatigues of a short but distressing campaign and vorable opportunity. It was during this state of expectancy, about the end of May, that vague rumors got afloat foreshadowing the impending movement of the Confedd not yet entirely recovered from the long march it had made in the beginning of May. In spite of the efforts of its new chief, General Pleasonton, who had deservedes' brigade is reported as attached in the returns of this army for the month of May. Imboden's brigade was never officially connected with it. were admirably adapt
on against excessive stockjobbing caused the price of gold to fall forty-seven per cent.—that is to say, to the rate of 125—in the early part of July. From the 1st of May the Federal bonds were sold at the rate of $50,000,000 per month until the supply was entirely exhausted. Consequently, when the fiscal year was ended, the sments in this indirect way than could have been done directly by drafting. During the first six months which followed the creation of provostmarshals, from the 1st of May to the 1st of November, 1863, the latter arrested not less than 22,000 deserters or refractory conscripts, the reports making no distinction between these two cment could easily have detached ten thousand to reinforce the Army of the Potomac: the same thing may be said of the fourteen thousand under Peck, who since the 1st of May had scarcely had an enemy before them at Suffolk, and from eight to ten thousand of the twelve thousand who under Keyes were occupying their leisure hours in t
which throughout its entire length exposed its flank to the attacks of the enemy. The utmost secrecy could alone ward off the danger of these attacks. The forest of the Wilderness had resumed its wonted stillness, disturbed only by the footsteps of Confederate scouts; the grass had covered the corpses and the debris of every kind which lay scattered among the woods; the Federal trenches, the torn and shattered trees, and the vestiges of fires, alone recalled to mind the conflict of the 3d of May. Precisely one month to a day had elapsed since this battle when Longstreet's First division, under McLaws, penetrated this henceforth historical Wilderness. Another division followed it closely; the Third, under Hood, was already on the banks of the Rapidan, and the whole army corps, crossing this river, reached the neighborhood of Culpeper Courthouse on the evening of the 7th. A portion of Ewells corps had started in the same direction on the 4th; the remainder moved forward on the
nati General Burnside was in command of the Department of the Ohio, with Headquarters at Cincinnati.—Ed. had found some temporary compensation for the disfavor which had fallen upon him after his defeat, having published an order General Orders, No. 38, Headquarters Department of the Ohio, April 13, 1863.—Ed. threatening to have any person shot who should give aid and comfort to the enemy in the State of Ohio, Vallandigham made an open attack upon this order. Five days later, on the 5th of May, he was arrested and tried before a military tribunal. Serious troubles broke out after his arrest in the little town of Dayton, where he resided. The writ of habeas corpus issued in his behalf by a Cincinnati judge was presented to the military authority without effect; but, despite the increasing excitement produced in this town by the arrest of a man of such high distinction, the cause was publicly prosecuted and with the ordinary guarantees of the law. Mr. Vallandigham defended himse
nagement. His authority and his experience dispelled many prejudices and saved the great association which was forming under his presidency from much trouble. The first communication from the delegates to the Secretary of War, written on the 18th of May, was followed by another five days later with more distinct propositions. It asked for the appointment of a consulting commission composed of employes of the government and of persons not connected with the administration, to act independentlfriendly hand to a power capable of maintaining its independence by such efforts. To Lee's army was awarded the great and perilous honor of performing this task. Pemberton had been shut up in Vicksburg with the remnants of his army since the 18th of May. Bragg's only care at Tullahoma was to free himself, without troubling himself about gaining the distant shores of the Ohio unless powerfully reinforced. It is true that Longstreet had proposed to Lee to go and reinforce Bragg with his arm
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...