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Saint Francis (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
their powerful protector. Yet the zeal of De Monts survived, and he quickened the courage of Champlain. After the short supremacy of Charles de Bourbon, the Prince of 1611, 1612. Conde, an avowed protector of the Calvinists, became viceroy of New France; through his intercession, mer- 1615. chants of St. Malo, Rouen, and La Rochelle, obtained a colonial patent from the king; and Champlain, now sure of success, embarked once more for the New World, accompanied by monks of the order of St. Francis. Again he invades the territory of the Iroquois in New York. Wounded, and repulsed, and destitute of guides, he Chap. I.} 1615, 1616. spends the first winter after his return to America in the country of the Hurons; and a knight errant among the forests carries his language, religion, and influence, even to the hamlets of Algonquins, near Lake Nipissing. Religious disputes combined with commercial jeal- 1617 to 1620 July ousies to check the progress of the colony; yet in the summe
Palos (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
sea from the Chap. I.} latitude of Iceland to near the equator at Elmina. Though yet longer baffled by the scepticism which knew not how to share his aspirations, he lost nothing of the grandeur of his conceptions, or the proud magnanimity of his character, or devotion to the sublime enterprise to which he held himself elected from his infancy by the promises of God; and when half resolved to withdraw from Spain, travelling on foot, he knocked at the gate of the monastery of La Rabida, at Palos, to crave the needed charity of food and shelter for himself and his little son whom he led by the hand, the destitute and forsaken seaman, in his naked poverty, was still the promiser of kingdoms; holding firmly in his grasp the keys of the ocean sea, claiming as it were from Heaven the Indies as his own, and dividing them as he pleased. The increase of years did not impair his holy confidence; and in 1492, when he seemed to have outlived the 1492. possibility of success, he gave a New Wo
Leydon (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ry of the Iroquois in New York. Wounded, and repulsed, and destitute of guides, he Chap. I.} 1615, 1616. spends the first winter after his return to America in the country of the Hurons; and a knight errant among the forests carries his language, religion, and influence, even to the hamlets of Algonquins, near Lake Nipissing. Religious disputes combined with commercial jeal- 1617 to 1620 July ousies to check the progress of the colony; yet in the summer, when the Pilgrims were leaving Leyden, in obedience to the wishes of the unhappy Montmorenci, the new viceroy, Champlain, began a fort. The merchants grudged the expense. It is not best to yield to the passions of men, was his reply; they sway but for a season; it is a duty to respect the future; and in a few years the castle St. Louis, so long the place 1624. of council against the Iroquois and against New England, was durably founded on a commanding cliff. In the same year, the viceroyalty was transferred to 1624. the r
Huguenot (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s already selected as the appropriate site for a fort. Champlain returned to France just before an exclusive 1603 Nov 8. patent had been issued to a Calvinist, the able, patriotic, and honest De Monts. The sovereignty of Acadia and its confines, from the fortieth to the forty-sixth degree of latitude, that is, from Philadelphia to beyond Chap. I.} 1603. Montreal; a still wider monopoly of the fur-trade; the exclusive control of the soil, government, and trade; freedom of religion for Huguenot emigrants,—these were the privileges which the charter conceded. Idlers, and men without a profession, and all banished men, were doomed to lend him aid. A lucrative monopoly was added to the honors of territorial jurisdiction. Wealth and glory were alike expected. An expedition was prepared without delay, and left 1604. Mar. 7. the shores of France, not to return till a permanent French settlement should be made in America. All New France was now contained in two ships, which follow
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
hat the coasts of America were extensively explored, and colonies established on the shores of Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. It is even suggested, that these early adventurers anchored near the harbor of Boston, or in the bays of New Jersey; and Danish antiquaries believe that Northmen entered the waters of Rhode Island, inscribed their adventures on the rocks of Taunton River, gave the name of Vinland to the south-east coasts of New England, and explored the inlets of our country as far as Carolina. But the story of the colonization of America by North-men, rests on narratives, mythological in form, and obscure in meaning; ancient, yet not contemporary. The chief document is an interpolation in the history of Chap. I.} Sturleson, whose zealous curiosity could hardly have neglected the discovery of a continent. The geographical details are too vague to sustain a conjecture; the accounts of the mild winter and fertile soil are, on any modern hypothesis, fictitious or exaggerated; t
Bristol Bay (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
of the Grand Cham. But he saw no human being whatsoever, although there were marks that the region was inhabited. He planted on the land a large cross with the flag of England, and from affection for the Republic of Venice, he added also the banner of St. Mark, which had never before been borne so far. On his homeward voyage he saw on his right hand two islands, which for want of provisions he could not stop to explore. After an absence of three months, the great discoverer re-entered Bristol harbor, where due honors awaited him. The king gave him money, and encouraged him to continue his career. The people called him the great admiral; he dressed in silk; and the English, and even Venetians who chanced to be at Bristol, ran after him with such zeal that he could enlist for a new voyage as many as he pleased. A second time Columbus had brought back tidings from the land and isles which were still described as the outposts of India. It appeared to be demonstrated that ships migh
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
dered by beautiful meadows, so pleased the imagination of Poutrincourt, a leader in the enterprise, that he sued for a grant of it from De Monts, and, naming it Port Royal, determined to reside there with his family. The company of De Monts made their first attempt at a settlement on the island of St. 1604. Croix, at the mouth ol visible, 1798. when our eastern boundary was ascertained. Yet the island was so ill suited to their purposes, that, in the following spring, they removed to Port Royal. 1605 For an agricultural colony, a milder climate was more desirable; in view of a settlement at the south, De Monts explored and claimed for France the rivFrance, and was now returned with supplies, himself renewed the design; but, meeting with Nov. 14. disasters among the shoals of Cape Cod, he, too, returned to Port Royal. There the first French settle- 1605 ment on the American continent had been made; two years before James River was discovered, and three years before a cabin
Cathay (North Dakota, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
, 1498, Columbus, radiant with a glory that shed a lustre over his misfortunes and griefs, calling on the Holy Trinity with vows, and seeing paradise in his dreams, embarked on his third voyage to discover the main land within the tropics, and to be sent back in chains. In the early part of the same month, Sebastian Cabot, then not much more than twenty-one years of age, chiefly at his own cost, led forth two ships and a large company of English volunteers, to find the north-west passage to Cathay and Japan. A few days after the English navigator had left the port of Bristol, Vasco de Gama, of Portugal, as daring and almost as young, having turned the Cape of Good Hope, cleared the Straits of Mozambique, and sailed beyond Arabia Felix, came in sight of the mountains of Hindostan; and his happy crew, decking out his little fleet with flags, sounding trumpets, praising God, and full of festivity Chap. I.} 1498. and gladness, steered into the harbor of Calicut. Meantime Cabot proceed
Cuba, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
tinuing his voyage, according to the line of the shore, he found the natives of those regions clad in skins of beasts, but they were not without the faculty of reason, and in many places were acquainted with the use of copper. In the early part of his voyage, he had been so far to the north, that in the month of July the light of day was almost continuous; before he turned homewards, in the late autumn, he believed he had attained the latitude of the Straits of Gibraltar and the longitude of Cuba. As he sailed along the extensive coast, a gentle westerly current appeared to prevail in the northern sea. Such is the meagre account given by Sebastian Cabot, through his friend Peter Martyr, the historian of the ocean, of that great voyage which was undertaken by the authority of the most wise prince Henry the Seventh, and made known to England a country much larger than Christendom. Thus the year 1498 stands singularly famous in the annals of the sea. In May, Vasco de Gama reached
Castile, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ming as it were from Heaven the Indies as his own, and dividing them as he pleased. The increase of years did not impair his holy confidence; and in 1492, when he seemed to have outlived the 1492. possibility of success, he gave a New World to Castile and Leon, the like of which was never done by any man in ancient or in later times. The self-love of Ferdinand of Spain was offended at owing to a foreigner benefits too vast for requital; and the contemporaries of the great mariner persecutee most intense public curiosity, he was reverenced for his achievements, his knowledge of cosmography, and his skill in navigation. On the death of Henry the Seventh he was called out of England by the command of Ferdinand, the Catholic king of Castile, and was appointed one of the Council for the New Indies, ever cherishing the hope to discover that hidden secret of nature, the direct passage to Asia. In 1518 he was named Pilot Major of Spain, and no 1518 one could guide a ship to the Indie
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