hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
New England (United States) 260 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 236 0 Browse Search
John Winthrop 190 0 Browse Search
John Smith 182 0 Browse Search
Hazard 160 0 Browse Search
Hening 138 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 134 0 Browse Search
France (France) 128 0 Browse Search
Chalmers 128 0 Browse Search
N. Y. Hist 116 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 748 total hits in 213 results.

... 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
aces this event in 1545, without reason. but no considerable advances in geographical knowledge appear to have been made. The winter passed in sullenness and gloom. In June of the following year, he and his 1542 ships stole away and returned to France, just as Roberval arrived with a considerable reinforcement. Unsustained by Cartier, Roberval accomplished no more than a verification of previous discoveries. Remaining about a year in America, he abandoned his immense viceroy- Chap. I.} 1542. alty. Estates in Picardy were better than titles in Norimbega. His subjects must have been a sad company; during the winter, one was hanged for theft; several were put in irons; and divers persons, as well women as men, were whipped. By these means quiet was preserved. Perhaps the expedition on its return entered the Bay of Massachusetts; the French diplomatists always remembered, that Boston was built within the original limits of New France. The commission of Roberval was followed b
October, 1540 AD (search for this): chapter 5
rity between Cartier and Ro- 1541 berval of itself defeated the enterprise. Hakluyt, III. 286—297. Roberval was ambitious of power; and Cartier desired the exclusive honor of discovery. .They neither embarked in company, nor acted in concert. Cartier sailed Holmes, in Annals, i. 70, 71, places the departure of Cartier May 23, 1540. He follows, undoubtedly, the date in Hak. III. 286; which is, however, a misprint, or an error. For, first the patent of Cartier was not issued till October, 1540; next, the annalist can find no occupation for Cartier in Canada for one whole year; and, further, it is undisputed, that Roberval did not sail till April, 1542; and it is expressly said in the account of Roberval's voyage, Hak. III. 295, that Jaques Cartier and his company were sent with five sayles the yeere before. Belknap makes a similar mistake, i. 178. from St. Mar 23. Malo the next spring after the date of his commission; he arrived at the scene of his former adventures, ascende
May 23rd, 1540 AD (search for this): chapter 5
arrested for treason or counterfeiting money,—these were the people by whom the colony was, in part, to be established. Hazard, i. 19—21. The division of authority between Cartier and Ro- 1541 berval of itself defeated the enterprise. Hakluyt, III. 286—297. Roberval was ambitious of power; and Cartier desired the exclusive honor of discovery. .They neither embarked in company, nor acted in concert. Cartier sailed Holmes, in Annals, i. 70, 71, places the departure of Cartier May 23, 1540. He follows, undoubtedly, the date in Hak. III. 286; which is, however, a misprint, or an error. For, first the patent of Cartier was not issued till October, 1540; next, the annalist can find no occupation for Cartier in Canada for one whole year; and, further, it is undisputed, that Roberval did not sail till April, 1542; and it is expressly said in the account of Roberval's voyage, Hak. III. 295, that Jaques Cartier and his company were sent with five sayles the yeere before. Belkna<
against attempting a colony. The intense severity of the climate terrified even the inhabitants of the north Chap. I.} 1540. of France; and no mines of silver and gold, no veins abounding in diamonds and precious stones, had been promised by the be corrected by the documents and original accounts in L'Escarbot and Hakluyt. a commission. It was easy to confer prov- 1540. Jan. 15. inces and plant colonies upon parchment; Roberval could congratulate himself on being the acknowledged lord of t Cartier also received a commission. Its terms merit consideration. He was appointed captain-general and chief pilot of 1540. Oct. 17. the expedition; he was directed to take with him persons of every trade and art; to repair to the newlydiscovered territory; and to dwell there with the natives. But where were the honest tradesmen and in- Chap. I.} 1540. dustrious mechanics to be found, who would repair to this New World? The commission gave Cartier full authority to ransack the prisons;
tradition, that he perished at sea, having been engaged in an expedition of which no tidings were ever heard. Such a report might easily be spread respecting a great navigator who had disappeared from the public view; and the rumor might be adopted by an incautious historian. It is probable, that Verrazzani had only retired from the fatigues of the life of a mariner; and, while others believed him buried in the ocean, he may have long enjoyed at Rome the friendship of men of letters, with 1537. the delights of tranquil employment. See Annibale Caro, Lettere Familiari, tom. l. let 12. Yet such is the obscurity of the accounts respecting his life, that certainty cannot be established. Tiraboschi, VII. 263, ed. 1809. Compare, also, Ensayo Cronologico à la Historia de la Florida, Año Mdxxiv. But the misfortunes of the French monarchy did not 1527. affect the industry of its fishermen; who, amidst the miseries of France, still resorted to Newfoundland. There exists a letter
t the approach of spring, a cross was solemnly erected upon land, and on it a shield was suspended, which bore the arms of France, and an inscription, declaring Francis to be the rightful king of these new-found regions. Having thus claimed pos- 1536 July 6. session of the territory, the Breton mariner once more regained St. Malo. The description which Cartier gave of the country 1536 to 1540 bordering on the St. Lawrence, furnished arguments Charlevoix, N. F. i. 20. against attempting 1536 to 1540 bordering on the St. Lawrence, furnished arguments Charlevoix, N. F. i. 20. against attempting a colony. The intense severity of the climate terrified even the inhabitants of the north Chap. I.} 1540. of France; and no mines of silver and gold, no veins abounding in diamonds and precious stones, had been promised by the faithful narrative of the voyage. Three or four years, therefore, elapsed, before plans of colonization were renewed. Yet imagination did not fail to anticipate the establishment of a state upon the fertile banks of a river, which surpassed all the streams of Europe i
teered to join the new expedition. Solemn preparations were made for departure; religion prepared a splendid pageant, previous to the embarkation; the whole company, repairing to the cathedral, received absolution and the bishop's blessing. The 1535. May 19. adventurers were eager to cross the Atlantic; and the squadron sailed See the original account of the voyage in Hakluyt, III. 262—285 Compare Charlevoix, N. F. i. 8—15; Belknap's Am. Biog. i. 164—178. Purchas is less copious for the ation in the territory which now began to be known as New France. Hakluyt, III. 285 It was after a stormy voyage, that they arrived within sight of Newfoundland. Passing to the west of that island on the day of St. Lawrence, they gave the 1535. Aug. 10. name of that martyr to a portion of the noble gulf which opened before them; a name which has gradualy extended to the whole gulf, and to the river. Sail- Chap. I.} 1535 ing to the north of Anticosti, they ascended the stream in Septe<
in minute particulars. He merits the gratitude of every student of American history. Purchas, i. 931, edition of 1617, says,—Francis I. sent thither James Breton. This person can be no other than James Cartier, a Breton. entered the Chap. I.} 1534. Sept. 5. harbor of St. Malo in security. His native city and France were filled with the tidings of his discoveries. The voyage had been easy and successful. Even at this day, the passage to and fro is not often made more rapidly or more safely. Could a gallant nation, which was then ready to contend for power and honor with the united force of Austria and Spain, hesitate to pursue the career of discovery, so prosperously opened? The court listened 1534. to the urgency of the friends of Cartier; Charlevoix, N. F. i. 9. a new commission was issued; three well-furnished ships were provided by the king; and some of the young nobility of France volunteered to join the new expedition. Solemn preparations were made for departure;
ner; and, while others believed him buried in the ocean, he may have long enjoyed at Rome the friendship of men of letters, with 1537. the delights of tranquil employment. See Annibale Caro, Lettere Familiari, tom. l. let 12. Yet such is the obscurity of the accounts respecting his life, that certainty cannot be established. Tiraboschi, VII. 263, ed. 1809. Compare, also, Ensayo Cronologico à la Historia de la Florida, Año Mdxxiv. But the misfortunes of the French monarchy did not 1527. affect the industry of its fishermen; who, amidst the miseries of France, still resorted to Newfoundland. There exists a letter Rut, in Purchas, III. 809. to Henry VIII., from the haven Aug 3. of St. John, in Newfoundland, written by an English captain, in which he declares, he found in that one harbor Chap. I.} 1527 eleven sail of Normans and one Breton, engaged in the fishery. The French king, engrossed by the passionate and unsuccessful rivalry with Charles V., could hardly respec
more in France. His own narrative of the voyage is the earliest original account, now extant, of the coast of the United States. He advanced the knowledge of the country; and he gave to France some claim to an extensive territory, on the pretext of discovery. Chalmers's Annals, 512. Harris's Voyages, II. 348,349. The historians of maritime adventure agree, that 1525 Verrazzani again embarked upon an expedition, from which, it is usually added, he never returned. Did he Chap. I.} 1525 Feb. 24. sail once more under the auspices of France? Charlevoix, Nouv. Fr. i. 7, 8. When the monarch had just lost every thing but honor in the disastrous battle of Pavia, is it probable, that the impoverished government could have sent forth another expedition? Did he relinquish the service of France for that of England? It is hardly a safe conjecture, 1527 that he was murdered in an encounter with savages, while on a voyage of discovery, which Henry VIII. had favored. Memoir of
... 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22