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July 8th, 1524 AD (search for this): chapter 5
Memoire, &c. 104. when at length Francis I., a monarch who had invited Da Vinci and Cellini to transplant the fine arts into his kingdom, employed John Verrazzani, another Florentine, to explore the new regions, which had alike excited curi- 1523 osity and hope. It was by way of the isle of Madeira, that the Italian, parting from a fleet which had cruised successfully along the shores of Spain, sailed for Amer- 1524 Jan. 17. ica, See Verrazzani's letter to Francis I., from Dieppe, July 8, 1524, in Hakluyt, III. 357—364, or in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 45—60. It is also in Ramusio. Compare Charlevoix, N. F. i. 5—8. with a single caravel, resolute to make discovery of new countries. The Dolphin, though it had the Chap. I.} 1524 good hap of a fortunate name, was overtaken by as terrible a tempest, as mariners ever encountered; and fifty days elapsed before the continent appeared in view. At length, in the latitude of Wilmington S. Miller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 23. In the <
April, 1524 AD (search for this): chapter 5
of cosmography, and his skill in navigation. On the death of Henry the Seventh he was called out of England by the command of Ferdinand, the Catholic king of Castile, and was appointed one of the Council for the New Indies, ever cherishing the hope to discover that hidden secret of nature, the direct passage to Asia. In 1518 he was named Pilot Major of Spain, and no 1518 one could guide a ship to the Indies whom he had not first examined and approved. He attended the congress which in April 1524 assembled at Badajoz 1524. to decide on the respective pretensions of Portugal and Spain to the islands of the Moluccas. He subsequently sailed to South America, under the auspices of Charles V., though not with entire success. On his return to his native land, he advanced its commerce by opposing a mercantile monopoly, and was pensioned and rewarded for his merits as the Great Seaman. It 1549. was he who framed the instructions for the expedition which discovered the passage to Archa
he Indies whom he had not first examined and approved. He attended the congress which in April 1524 assembled at Badajoz 1524. to decide on the respective pretensions of Portugal and Spain to the islands of the Moluccas. He subsequently sailed to adeira, that the Italian, parting from a fleet which had cruised successfully along the shores of Spain, sailed for Amer- 1524 Jan. 17. ica, See Verrazzani's letter to Francis I., from Dieppe, July 8, 1524, in Hakluyt, III. 357—364, or in N. Y. of curiosity, and the desire to gratify a vulgar wonder. The harbor of New York especially attracted notice, Chap. I.} 1524 April. for its great convenience and pleasantness; the eyes of the covetous could discern mineral wealth in the hills of NMiller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 25. Belknap's Am. Biog. i. 33. Leaving the waters of Rhode Island, the persevering 1524 May 5. mariner sailed along the whole coast of New England to Nova Scotia, till he approached the latitude of fifty degree
contentment. For nearly sixty years, during a period when marine adventure engaged the most intense public curiosity, he was reverenced for his achievements, his knowledge of cosmography, and his skill in navigation. On the death of Henry the Seventh he was called out of England by the command of Ferdinand, the Catholic king of Castile, and was appointed one of the Council for the New Indies, ever cherishing the hope to discover that hidden secret of nature, the direct passage to Asia. In 1518 he was named Pilot Major of Spain, and no 1518 one could guide a ship to the Indies whom he had not first examined and approved. He attended the congress which in April 1524 assembled at Badajoz 1524. to decide on the respective pretensions of Portugal and Spain to the islands of the Moluccas. He subsequently sailed to South America, under the auspices of Charles V., though not with entire success. On his return to his native land, he advanced its commerce by opposing a mercantile monopo
October 19th, 1501 AD (search for this): chapter 5
icitations, that Columbus had obtained the opportunity of discovery. Upon the certainty of success, a throng of adventurers eagerly engaged in voyages, to explore the New World, or to plunder its inhabitants. The king of Portugal, grieved at having neglected Columbus, readily favored an expedition for northern discovery. Gaspar Cortereal See the leading document on the voyage of Cortereal, in a letter from Pietro Pasqualigo, Venetian ambassador in Portugal, written to his brother, October 19, 1501, in Paesi novamente ritrovati et Novo Mondo da Alberico Vesputio Florentino intitulato. L. VI. c. XXV. The original and the French translation are both in the library of Harvard College. was 1500 appointed commander of the enterprise. He reached the shores of North America, ranged the coast for a 1501. distance of six or seven hundred miles, and carefully observed the country and its inhabitants. The most northern point Herrera, d. i. l. VI. c. XVI. Gomara, c. XXXVII. Also
iscovery. Gaspar Cortereal See the leading document on the voyage of Cortereal, in a letter from Pietro Pasqualigo, Venetian ambassador in Portugal, written to his brother, October 19, 1501, in Paesi novamente ritrovati et Novo Mondo da Alberico Vesputio Florentino intitulato. L. VI. c. XXV. The original and the French translation are both in the library of Harvard College. was 1500 appointed commander of the enterprise. He reached the shores of North America, ranged the coast for a 1501. distance of six or seven hundred miles, and carefully observed the country and its inhabitants. The most northern point Herrera, d. i. l. VI. c. XVI. Gomara, c. XXXVII. Also in Eden, fol 227. Galvano, in Hakluyt, IV. 419. Purchas, i. 95, 916. Memoir of Cabot, b. II. c. III. and IV. which he attained, was probably about the fiftieth degree. Of the country along which he sailed, he had occasion to admire the brilliant freshness of the verdure, and the density of the stately forest
May, 1498 AD (search for this): chapter 5
enship in 1476, only after the residence of fifteen years, which was required of aliens before denization. His second son, Sebastian Cabot, probably a Venetian by birth, a cosmographer by profession, succeeded to the designs of his father. He reasoned justly, that as the degrees of longitude decrease towards the north, the shortest route to China and Japan lies in the highest practicable latitude; and with all the impetuosity of youthful fervor he gave himself up to the experiment. In May, 1498, Columbus, radiant with a glory that shed a lustre over his misfortunes and griefs, calling on the Holy Trinity with vows, and seeing paradise in his dreams, embarked on his third voyage to discover the main land within the tropics, and to be sent back in chains. In the early part of the same month, Sebastian Cabot, then not much more than twenty-one years of age, chiefly at his own cost, led forth two ships and a large company of English volunteers, to find the north-west passage to Cath
and rubies, with diamonds and gold. On the third day of the month 1498. of February next after his return, John Kaboto, Venician, accordingore to set sail with as many companions as would go with Chap. I.} 1498. him of their own will. With this license every trace of John Cabot, sounding trumpets, praising God, and full of festivity Chap. I.} 1498. and gladness, steered into the harbor of Calicut. Meantime Cabot p to England a country much larger than Christendom. Thus the year 1498 stands singularly famous in the annals of the sea. In May, Vasco de ma reached Hindostan by way of the Cape of Good Hope; in Chap. I.} 1498. August, Columbus discovered the firm land of South 1498. America, 1498. America, and the river Oronoco, which seemed to him to flow from some large empire, or perhaps even from the terrestrial paradise itself; and in the sud by the placid mildness of his character, and those who Chap. I.} 1498. approached him spread the fame of his courtesy. Without the stern
June 24th, 1497 AD (search for this): chapter 5
e countries that might be found, was reserved to them and to their assigns, unconditionally and without limit of time. Under this patent, which, at the first direction of 1497. English enterprise towards America, embodied the worst features of monopoly and commercial restriction, John Cabot, taking with him his son Sebastian, embarked in quest of new islands and a passage to Asia by the north-west. After sailing prosperously, as he thought, for seven hundred leagues, on the twenty-fourth day of June, 1497, early in the morning, almost fourteen months before Columbus on his third voyage came in sight of the main, and more than Chap. I.} 1497. two years before Amerigo Vespucci sailed west of the Canaries, he discovered the western continent, probably in the latitude of about fifty-six degrees, among the dismal cliffs of Labrador. He ran along the coast for many leagues, it is said even for three hundred, and landed on what he considered to be the territory of the Grand Cham. But
ifth part of their gains; while the exclusive right of frequenting all the countries that might be found, was reserved to them and to their assigns, unconditionally and without limit of time. Under this patent, which, at the first direction of 1497. English enterprise towards America, embodied the worst features of monopoly and commercial restriction, John Cabot, taking with him his son Sebastian, embarked in quest of new islands and a passage to Asia by the north-west. After sailing prosperously, as he thought, for seven hundred leagues, on the twenty-fourth day of June, 1497, early in the morning, almost fourteen months before Columbus on his third voyage came in sight of the main, and more than Chap. I.} 1497. two years before Amerigo Vespucci sailed west of the Canaries, he discovered the western continent, probably in the latitude of about fifty-six degrees, among the dismal cliffs of Labrador. He ran along the coast for many leagues, it is said even for three hundred, and
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