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Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ed the summit, he was moved to admiration by the prospect before him of woods, and waters, and mountains. Imagination presented it as the future emporium of inland commerce, and the metropolis of a prosperous province; filled with bright anticipations, he called the hill Mont-Real, Hakluyt, III. 272. and time, that has transferred the name to the island, is realizing his visions. Cartier also gathered of the Indians some indistinct account of the countries now contained in the north of Vermont and New York. Re joining his ships, the winter, rendered frightful by the ravages of the scurvy, was passed where they were anchored. At the approach of spring, a cross was solemnly erected upon land, and on it a shield was suspended, which bore the arms of France, and an inscription, declaring Francis to be the rightful king of these new-found regions. Having thus claimed pos- 1536 July 6. session of the territory, the Breton mariner once more regained St. Malo. The description whic
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
established on the shores of Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. It is even suggested, that these early adventurers anchored near the harbor of Boston, or in the bays of New Jersey; and Danish antiquaries believe that Northmen entered the waters of Rhode Island, inscribed their adventures on the rocks of Taunton River, gave the name of Vinland to the south-east coasts of New England, and explored the inlets of our country as far as Carolina. But the story of the colonization of America by North-men,n exhibited, they did not form a conception of their use, nor learn to covet their possession. Hakluyt, III. 361. Moulton's New York, i. 147, 148. Miller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 25. Belknap's Am. Biog. i. 33. Leaving the waters of Rhode Island, the persevering 1524 May 5. mariner sailed along the whole coast of New England to Nova Scotia, till he approached the latitude of fifty degrees. The natives of the more northern region were hostile and jealous; it was impossible to concili
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
reluctantly confessed, had been first visited by the Cabots. The fisheries had for some years been successfully pursued; savages from the north-eastern coast had been 1508 brought to France; Charlevoix, N. F. i. 4. plans of colonization in North 1518 America had been suggested by De Lery and Saint Just; L'Escarbot, 21. Memoire, &c. 104. when at length Francis I., a monarch who had invited Da Vinci and Cellini to transplant the fine arts into his kingdom, employed John Verrazzani, a was found, though the search extended fifty leagues to the south. Returning towards the north, he cast anchor on the coast; all the shore was shoal, but free from rocks, and covered with fine sand; the country was flat. It was the coast of North Carolina. Mutual was the wonder of the inquisitive foreigners, and the mild and feeble natives. The russet color of the Indians seemed like the complexion of the Saracens; their dress was of skins; their ornaments, garlands of feathers. They welcom
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ten repeated; that the coasts of America were extensively explored, and colonies established on the shores of Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. It is even suggested, that these early adventurers anchored near the harbor of Boston, or in the bays of New Jersey; and Danish antiquaries believe that Northmen entered the waters of Rhode Island, inscribed their adventures on the rocks of Taunton River, gave the name of Vinland to the south-east coasts of New England, and explored the inlets of our countryuriosity, and the desire to gratify a vulgar wonder. The harbor of New York especially attracted notice, Chap. I.} 1524 April. for its great convenience and pleasantness; the eyes of the covetous could discern mineral wealth in the hills of New Jersey. Hakluyt, III. 360, 361. N. Y. Hist Coll. i. 52, 53. Moulton's New York, i. 138, 139. In the spacious haven of Newport, Verrazzani remained for fifteen days. The natives were the goodliest people that he had found in the whole voyage.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Roberval accomplished no more than a verification of previous discoveries. Remaining about a year in America, he abandoned his immense viceroy- Chap. I.} 1542. alty. Estates in Picardy were better than titles in Norimbega. His subjects must have been a sad company; during the winter, one was hanged for theft; several were put in irons; and divers persons, as well women as men, were whipped. By these means quiet was preserved. Perhaps the expedition on its return entered the Bay of Massachusetts; the French diplomatists always remembered, that Boston was built within the original limits of New France. The commission of Roberval was followed by no per- 1549. manent results. It is confidently said, that, at a later date, he again embarked for his viceroyalty, accompanied by a numerous train of adventurers; and, as he was never more heard of, he may have perished at sea. Can it be a matter of surprise, that, for the next fifty 1550 to 1600. years, no further discoveries we
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
lowed. under the auspices of De Guercheville and Mary of 1613 Medici; the rude intrenchments of St. Sauveur were Chap. I.} 1613. raised by De Saussaye on the eastern shore of Mount 1613. Desert Isle. The conversion of the heathen was the motive to the settlement; the natives venerated Biart as a messenger from heaven; and under the summer sky, round a cross in the centre of the hamlet, matins and vespers were regularly chanted. France and the Roman religion had appropriated the soil of Maine. Meantime the remonstrances of French merchants had effected the revocation of the monopoly of De Monts, and a company of merchants of Dieppe and St. 1608. Malo had founded Quebec. The design was executed 1608. July 3. by Champlain, who aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory of founding a state. The city of Quebec was begun; that is to say, rude cottages were framed, a few fields were cleared, and one or two gardens planted. The next year, that singularly bold 1609. adv
Pax Augusta (Spain) (search for this): chapter 5
s skill in navigation. On the death of Henry the Seventh he was called out of England by the command of Ferdinand, the Catholic king of Castile, and was appointed one of the Council for the New Indies, ever cherishing the hope to discover that hidden secret of nature, the direct passage to Asia. In 1518 he was named Pilot Major of Spain, and no 1518 one could guide a ship to the Indies whom he had not first examined and approved. He attended the congress which in April 1524 assembled at Badajoz 1524. to decide on the respective pretensions of Portugal and Spain to the islands of the Moluccas. He subsequently sailed to South America, under the auspices of Charles V., though not with entire success. On his return to his native land, he advanced its commerce by opposing a mercantile monopoly, and was pensioned and rewarded for his merits as the Great Seaman. It 1549. was he who framed the instructions for the expedition which discovered the passage to Archangel. He 1558. lived
Pavia (Italy) (search for this): chapter 5
he gave to France some claim to an extensive territory, on the pretext of discovery. Chalmers's Annals, 512. Harris's Voyages, II. 348,349. The historians of maritime adventure agree, that 1525 Verrazzani again embarked upon an expedition, from which, it is usually added, he never returned. Did he Chap. I.} 1525 Feb. 24. sail once more under the auspices of France? Charlevoix, Nouv. Fr. i. 7, 8. When the monarch had just lost every thing but honor in the disastrous battle of Pavia, is it probable, that the impoverished government could have sent forth another expedition? Did he relinquish the service of France for that of England? It is hardly a safe conjecture, 1527 that he was murdered in an encounter with savages, while on a voyage of discovery, which Henry VIII. had favored. Memoir of S. Cabot, 271—276. Hakluyt asserts, that Verrazzani was thrice on the coast of America, and that he gave a map of it to the English monarch. Hakl. Divers Voyages, 1582, quo
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
nd colonies established on the shores of Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. It is even suggested, that these early adventurers anf Bacallaos, which still lingers on the eastern side of Newfoundland, and has passed into the language of the Germans and th the discovery of the continent, 1504 the fisheries of Newfoundland were known to the hardy mariners of Brittany and Norman; who, amidst the miseries of France, still resorted to Newfoundland. There exists a letter Rut, in Purchas, III. 809. to Henry VIII., from the haven Aug 3. of St. John, in Newfoundland, written by an English captain, in which he declares, hes weather brought him in twenty days upon the coasts of Newfoundland. Having almost circumnavigated the island, he turned tfter a stormy voyage, that they arrived within sight of Newfoundland. Passing to the west of that island on the day of St. here were one 1578 hundred and fifty French vessels at Newfoundland, and regular voyages, for traffic with the natives, beg
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
cene of his former adventures, ascended the St. Lawrence, and, near the site of Quebec, built a fort for the security of his party; Chalmers, 82, places this evente manners of the savage tribes, not less than the geography of the country; and Quebec was already selected as the appropriate site for a fort. Champlain returned De Monts, and a company of merchants of Dieppe and St. 1608. Malo had founded Quebec. The design was executed 1608. July 3. by Champlain, who aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory of founding a state. The city of Quebec was begun; that is to say, rude cottages were framed, a few fields were cleared, and one or two Europeans, joined a mixed party of Hurons from Montreal, and Algonquins from Quebec, in an expedition against the Iroquois, or Five Nations, in the north of New Yod to dissensions. The savages caused disquiet. But the persevering founder of Quebec appealed to the Royal Council and to Richelieu; and though disasters inter- 16
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