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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Eden, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s for the expedition which discovered the passage to Archangel. He 1558. lived to an extreme old age, and so loved his profession to the last, that in the hour of death his wandering thoughts were upon the ocean. The discoverer of the territory of our country was one of the most extraordinary men of his day: there is deep reason for regret that time has spared so few memorials of his career. Himself incapable of jealousy, he did not escape detraction. Peter Martyr, d. III. l. VI.; in Eden, fol. 125. He gave England a continent, Chap. I.} 1553 and no one knows his burial-place. It was after long solicitations, that Columbus had obtained the opportunity of discovery. Upon the certainty of success, a throng of adventurers eagerly engaged in voyages, to explore the New World, or to plunder its inhabitants. The king of Portugal, grieved at having neglected Columbus, readily favored an expedition for northern discovery. Gaspar Cortereal See the leading document on the voya
Moulton (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
f New York especially attracted notice, Chap. I.} 1524 April. for its great convenience and pleasantness; the eyes of the covetous could discern mineral wealth in the hills of New Jersey. Hakluyt, III. 360, 361. N. Y. Hist Coll. i. 52, 53. Moulton's New York, i. 138, 139. In the spacious haven of Newport, Verrazzani remained for fifteen days. The natives were the goodliest people that he had found in the whole voyage. They were liberal and friendly; yet so ignorant, that, though instruments of steel and iron were often exhibited, they did not form a conception of their use, nor learn to covet their possession. Hakluyt, III. 361. Moulton's New York, i. 147, 148. Miller, in N. Y. Hist. Coll. i. 25. Belknap's Am. Biog. i. 33. Leaving the waters of Rhode Island, the persevering 1524 May 5. mariner sailed along the whole coast of New England to Nova Scotia, till he approached the latitude of fifty degrees. The natives of the more northern region were hostile and j
Taunton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
to Green land, and were driven by adverse winds from Greenland to the shores of Labrador; that the voyage was often repeated; that the coasts of America were extensively explored, and colonies established on the shores of Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. It is even suggested, that these early adventurers anchored near the harbor of Boston, or in the bays of New Jersey; and Danish antiquaries believe that Northmen entered the waters of Rhode Island, inscribed their adventures on the rocks of Taunton River, gave the name of Vinland to the south-east coasts of New England, and explored the inlets of our country as far as Carolina. But the story of the colonization of America by North-men, rests on narratives, mythological in form, and obscure in meaning; ancient, yet not contemporary. The chief document is an interpolation in the history of Chap. I.} Sturleson, whose zealous curiosity could hardly have neglected the discovery of a continent. The geographical details are too vague to su
Lake Nipissing (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
al patent from the king; and Champlain, now sure of success, embarked once more for the New World, accompanied by monks of the order of St. Francis. Again he invades the territory of the Iroquois in New York. Wounded, and repulsed, and destitute of guides, he Chap. I.} 1615, 1616. spends the first winter after his return to America in the country of the Hurons; and a knight errant among the forests carries his language, religion, and influence, even to the hamlets of Algonquins, near Lake Nipissing. Religious disputes combined with commercial jeal- 1617 to 1620 July ousies to check the progress of the colony; yet in the summer, when the Pilgrims were leaving Leyden, in obedience to the wishes of the unhappy Montmorenci, the new viceroy, Champlain, began a fort. The merchants grudged the expense. It is not best to yield to the passions of men, was his reply; they sway but for a season; it is a duty to respect the future; and in a few years the castle St. Louis, so long the pla
St. Just (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 5
i 3 and 4. Memoire sur les Limites de l'acadie, 104—a good historic outline. a citizen of Honfleur; and the fishermen of the north-west of France derived wealth from the regions, which, it was reluctantly confessed, had been first visited by the Cabots. The fisheries had for some years been successfully pursued; savages from the north-eastern coast had been 1508 brought to France; Charlevoix, N. F. i. 4. plans of colonization in North 1518 America had been suggested by De Lery and Saint Just; L'Escarbot, 21. Memoire, &c. 104. when at length Francis I., a monarch who had invited Da Vinci and Cellini to transplant the fine arts into his kingdom, employed John Verrazzani, another Florentine, to explore the new regions, which had alike excited curi- 1523 osity and hope. It was by way of the isle of Madeira, that the Italian, parting from a fleet which had cruised successfully along the shores of Spain, sailed for Amer- 1524 Jan. 17. ica, See Verrazzani's letter to Franc
Cape Farewell (New Zealand) (search for this): chapter 5
se zealous curiosity could hardly have neglected the discovery of a continent. The geographical details are too vague to sustain a conjecture; the accounts of the mild winter and fertile soil are, on any modern hypothesis, fictitious or exaggerated; the description of the natives applies only to the Esquimaux, inhabitants of hyperborean regions, the remark which should define the length of the shortest winter's day, has received interpretations adapted to every latitude from New York to Cape Farewell; and Vinland has been sought in all directions, from Greenland and the St. Lawrence to Africa. The intrepid mariners who colonized Greenland could easily have extended their voyages to Labrador; no clear historic evidence establishes the natural probability that they accomplished the passage. Imagination had conceived that vast inhabited regions lay hidden in the dark recesses of the west. Nearly three centuries before the Christian era, Aristotle, following the lessons of the Pytha
Japan (Japan) (search for this): chapter 5
om travels beyond the Ganges, had filled the world with dazzling descriptions of the wealth of China as well as marvellous reports of the outlying island empire of Japan. It began to be believed that the continent of Asia stretched over far more than a hemisphere, and that the remaining distance round the globe was comparatively iofession, succeeded to the designs of his father. He reasoned justly, that as the degrees of longitude decrease towards the north, the shortest route to China and Japan lies in the highest practicable latitude; and with all the impetuosity of youthful fervor he gave himself up to the experiment. In May, 1498, Columbus, radiant wi than twenty-one years of age, chiefly at his own cost, led forth two ships and a large company of English volunteers, to find the north-west passage to Cathay and Japan. A few days after the English navigator had left the port of Bristol, Vasco de Gama, of Portugal, as daring and almost as young, having turned the Cape of Good Ho
China (China) (search for this): chapter 5
the navigation from the eastern coast Chap. I.} of Africa to Arabia had reached the western kingdoms of Europe; and adventurous Venetians, returning from travels beyond the Ganges, had filled the world with dazzling descriptions of the wealth of China as well as marvellous reports of the outlying island empire of Japan. It began to be believed that the continent of Asia stretched over far more than a hemisphere, and that the remaining distance round the globe was comparatively inconsiderable.ation. His second son, Sebastian Cabot, probably a Venetian by birth, a cosmographer by profession, succeeded to the designs of his father. He reasoned justly, that as the degrees of longitude decrease towards the north, the shortest route to China and Japan lies in the highest practicable latitude; and with all the impetuosity of youthful fervor he gave himself up to the experiment. In May, 1498, Columbus, radiant with a glory that shed a lustre over his misfortunes and griefs, calling on
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 5
rt of the fifteenth century the navigators of Portugal had confined their explorations to the coast more than ten years of vain solicitations in Portugal, he left the banks of the Tagus, to seek the while all to the east of it was confirmed to Portugal. The commerce of the middle ages, concentrthe Indies; and England, which like Spain and Portugal looked out upon the ocean, became a competitod left the port of Bristol, Vasco de Gama, of Portugal, as daring and almost as young, having turned; De Gama is the hero of the national epic of Portugal; but the elder Cabot was so little celebratedenry VII. recognised the claims of Spain and Portugal, only so far as they actually occupied the te4. to decide on the respective pretensions of Portugal and Spain to the islands of the Moluccas. He, or to plunder its inhabitants. The king of Portugal, grieved at having neglected Columbus, readilrom Pietro Pasqualigo, Venetian ambassador in Portugal, written to his brother, October 19, 1501, in
Iceland (Iceland) (search for this): chapter 5
its reality. After more than ten years of vain solicitations in Portugal, he left the banks of the Tagus, to seek the aid of Ferdinand and Isabella, rich in nautical experience, having watched the stars at sea from the Chap. I.} latitude of Iceland to near the equator at Elmina. Though yet longer baffled by the scepticism which knew not how to share his aspirations, he lost nothing of the grandeur of his conceptions, or the proud magnanimity of his character, or devotion to the sublime en the two families; the spirit of commercial activity began to be successfully fostered; and the marts of England were frequented by Lombard adventurers. The fisheries of the north had long tempted the merchants of Bristol to an intercourse with Iceland; and had matured the nautical skill that could buffet the worst storms of the Atlantic. Nor is it impossible, that some uncertain traditions respecting the remote discoveries which Icelanders had made in Greenland towards the north-west, where
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