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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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September 6th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 20
Our correspondence. Norfolk, Sept, 6, 1861. "How music charms! How metre warms ! Parent of action, good and brave; How vice it tames And worth inflames, And holds proud empire o'r the grave." The concert last night was a decided success. It was given, as before stated, by amateur magicians of the Third Alabama Volunteers, the proceeds to be handed over to the Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society. The Opera House, which is very large and commodious, and one of the most beautiful in the country, was crowded to its utmost capacity, presenting a display of beauty and loveliness seldom if ever surpassed. After every seat in the capacious hall had been filled, galleries, parquet dress circle, private boxes and aisles were all occupied, the crowded masses patiently standing till the close of the performance. There were twelve of the amateur performers, all in Ethiopian character and costume, and the entertainment far surpassed the highest expectations of t
September 7th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 14
Our correspondence. Norfolk, Sept. 7, 1861. The Federal steamer Harriet Lane is reported in Hampton Roads, where she was towed from the Carolina coast. She will probably soon be furnished with an armament and coal, to supply the deficiency occasioned by getting aground near Hatteras. I learn that the Federal War Department has determined to establish a naval station at Hatteras Inlet, and that large quantities of coal and ammunition will shortly be stored there. Our Government is acting promptly, with a view to disappoint the confident expectations of the Hessians, prevent their depredations in the waters of Carolina, and to rout those who should not have been allowed to get possession of the fortifications at Hatteras.--But I will not give particulars of the movements which are known to be in progress. Different opinions are expressed relative to the engagement at Hatteras, and the brave boys at some of the forts below our city are eager for a chance to show thei
£11,754 in specie. Great Britain. Baron de Videl has been sentenced to a year's imprisonment for the assault on his son, and the latter to a month's imprisonment for refusing to give evidence against his parent. France. The Independence Belge publishes the substance of an autograph letter from the Emperor to the Pope, intimating that if the condition of affairs be ameliorated the present status quo will be maintained. The expenses of the French Department of War the year 1862 will be £1,200,000 more than the present year. The Paris Bourse has been less firm; rentes 68f. 50 Italy. The correspondent of the London Times gives a very gloomy account of the state of affairs at Naples. It is reported that General Turr is about to marry the Princess Weiss Bonaparte. Cardinals Piccolomini and Santucci are dead. Two supposed assassins had attempted to enter the house of Garibaldi by night. They escaped after being fired upon. One of them was w
r cent., and are at this moment compelled to pay ten or twelve per cent. We find, therefore, that while £60,000,000 annually would be added to their national debt, £6,000,000 annually would be added to the charge of that debt, so that four years and three-quarters of their present expenditure would saddle them with a burthen equal to that which we have incurred in a century and a half. Mr. Gladstone has to provide some £28,000,000 to satisfy the public creditors of Great Britain. In the year 1866, if the American war should be protracted so long, Mr. Chase's successor will have to provide rather more than that sum for the creditors of the Union. It is obvious to remark that the war may not be carried on so long, or continued at so heavy a cost; and, indeed, the exorbitant propositions of Congress were probably based upon the assumption that the way to make short work was to go to work unsparingly at first. But the history of the campaign up to the present point contains little t
Two days later from Europe.arrival of the Arabia. The Royal mail steamer Arabia, from Liverpool at 10 o'clock A. M., on the 24th, via Queenstown on the afternoon of the 25th of August, arrived at Halifax at 11 o'clock on Tuesday last. The Arabia has 102 passengers, and £11,754 in specie. Great Britain. Baron de Videl has been sentenced to a year's imprisonment for the assault on his son, and the latter to a month's imprisonment for refusing to give evidence against his parent. France. The Independence Belge publishes the substance of an autograph letter from the Emperor to the Pope, intimating that if the condition of affairs be ameliorated the present status quo will be maintained. The expenses of the French Department of War the year 1862 will be £1,200,000 more than the present year. The Paris Bourse has been less firm; rentes 68f. 50 Italy. The correspondent of the London Times gives a very gloomy account of the state of affairs at Na
an excited people, they will be sent East. Important naval movement in New Orleans. The Charleston Mercury has the following from its special correspondent: New Orleans, Aug. 28.--A passenger, who has just arrived in this city from Brashear city, by the Opelousas Railroad, reports that two Navy officers, of the Confederate States--Lieutenant Shepard and J. H. Loper, the Supervising Engineer of the Navy Station — had arrived at that place, and, at 2 o'clock in the morning of the 26th, had seized the steamer Picayune, which had just arrived with freight and passengers. They placed on board an armed force of 25 men from a Confederate States man-of-war steamer, and proceeded down to the mouth of the Bayon Chine for the purpose of attacking a Lincoln armed blockading schooner--one of the tenders of the United States steamer Huntsville. Commodore Hollins approves of their course. An order for Sullivan's Island. The Charleston papers publish the following order fro
terday. They report that the North Carolina Confederates are terribly exasperated on account of our recent victorious demonstration on their coast. The floating battery said to have been towed from Norfolk down to Sewell's Point exists only in imagination. From Fort Pickens. The United States gun-boat Wyandotte Commander Baldwin, arrived at New York on Wednesday, from Fort Pickens, which port she left on the 23d of August, touching at Key West, and leaving that port on the 29th. Left at Fort Pickens United States ship Colorado, Flag Officer Mervin. Left at Key West United States ships Santee, Captain Eagle; Keystone State, Capt. Scott; Crusader, Captain Craven--all well. Commander Baldwin reports the health or the troops at Fort Pickens good. The Secession troops have had a general stampede; large numbers of them had deserted and gone home. Major Mordecai and the Confederates. We learn from Philadelphia that Major Mordecai, late in command of
efending the coast and of protecting the citizens and property thereon, the people will do it. We call upon the Legislature, therefore, not to wait for everything to be done by the Confederate States Government, but to take steps themselves to prevent the advance of the invaders. A skirmish in western Virginia. The Southwestern Times gives the following account of a skirmish in Boone county, Va., of which the Federalists have published the most exaggerated statements: On Saturday, the 31st ult., a skirmish between a small Union force and about a dozen Secessionists took place near Boone C. H., in which two of the latter were wounded, and two or three horses were shot. The Secessionists retreated to the Court-House and being very bloody and bearing their wounded with them, produced a very great excitement in the village. The Unionists were reported to be advancing on the town, and the Secessionists expected to retire to an island near by and await reinforcements. Appea
Southern News. The Washington (N. C.) Dispatch publishes a graphic description of the bombardment and capture of Forts Clark and Hatteras, written by an officer on board the C. S. steamer Ellis. We cannot find room for it in this morning's paper. The writer makes the assertion that the invaders were guided on shore by a traitorous Methodist minister, named Taylor. The Wilmington Journal, of Saturday evening, says: A letter from Beaufort, dated the 5th, and received here this morning, conveys the information that a large war steamer was off that harbor for the last twenty-four hours. We trust that the people in that section will all be ready to receive them properly. There was a rumor this morning of a steamer having been seen off Camp Wyatt and Confederate Point last night. It was said that she had up a white flag. We cannot vouch for the accuracy of this last information. The Newbern Progress, alluding to the recent stampede from that place, says:
April, 7 AD (search for this): article 20
ected to cease in October. The French had claimed protection over Madagascar. The dates from Calcutta were to July 29th. The prospects of the indigo crop were bad. Incessant rain prevailed. The money market was stringent. Imports were weaker, and prices lower in some cases. The journals report that five cities of Tartary have been made over to the Russians by the Emperor of China. A new insurrection had broken out near Pekin. Japan. Shanghai dates to July 4th say that the relations between the European and Japanese Governments are likely to be disturbed. Foreign merchants were being robbed in open day, and it was believed that the Japanese Government sanctioned the proceedings. Latest — via Queenstown. Liverpool, Aug. 25.--The steamship Africa, from New York, has arrived. A European Conference is to be held at Constantinople, on the subject of the Principalities. Holland has officially recognized the Kingdom of Italy. It
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