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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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Excitement in Lynchburg. --On Thursday last Wm. J. Burton, company J. Virginia regiment. Corse's brigade, was killed at a hospital in Lynchburg by a free negro named Albert Wood, who struck him with a shovel. The next day a large number of the brigade took the negroes jail and were proceeding to him, when Gen. Corse appeared among them and by his , seizing a musket and threatening to shoot the first man who dared to disobey his orders, the negro was handed over to the civil authoritieding to him, when Gen. Corse appeared among them and by his , seizing a musket and threatening to shoot the first man who dared to disobey his orders, the negro was handed over to the civil authorities, the General explaining to the soldiers at the same time the disgrace, their contemplated act, it carried out, would bring upon the brigade. Under charge of the City Council the negro was then returned to jail, and a strong guard placed in attendance to prevent any further attempt at mob law.
Crittenden (search for this): article 2
north bank. They complained of short rations, and said they were boating provisions from across the river. On Saturday the same scouts captured five Yankees eight miles below Chattanooga, engaged in killing hogs. They professed to belong to Crittenden's corps, and said that they were starving, had not been in the fight, and had no stomach for it. All the prisoners — some of them field officers — with whom our informant had conversed admitted that they had been badly defeated, but said that they would whip us the next time. They admit that in the attack by Longstreet's and Hill's corps on Rosecrans's centre, composed of their heaviest crack corps — Crittenden's and Thomas's — these two corps lost fully one half of their men. On Friday night last, Wheeler's and Forrest's cavalry left under orders, crossing the river, provided with ten days rations. Our informant says that among the pieces of ordnance captured we have several line Napoleon and 20 pounder Parrott guns.
on he assigns for this hold movement is, that the Constitution requires all the States to vote, and that in the present condition of the country it is impossible to comply with the requirement. Thus Lincoln is President for life, with powers fully as absolute as those of Alexander H. or Napoleon III. The next step will be to make the office hereditary in his family, after which he may assume the imperial crown as soon as he may think proper. What luck for a rail-splitter. Sylla. Cæsar. Cromwell, and Napoleon, were accounted lucky men in their day, but their good fortune was sheer adversity compared to that of old Abe. They were all great men, and won their way to empire with their swords; but the most abject of Lincoln's sycophants — even the New York Herald itself — never called Lincoln a great man except in derision. He slips into the throne as easily and as gently as if he had been born in the purple. He steals into greatness as he stole into Washington upon his first advent.
John T. Davidson (search for this): article 8
Admitted to bail. --John T. Davidson and Jacob Eisenoer appeared before the Mayor last Saturday, charged with feloniously shooting each other in Broad street on Thursday afternoon last, and were each held to bail in $1500 to appear before a called Court for further examination.
Mr. Baker, from the Joint Committee on the Library, presented a report, which, on his motion, was laid on the table and ordered to be printed. The bill for the relief of the indigent soldiers of the State of Virginia who have been, or may be, disabled in the military service, and the widows and minor children of soldiers who have died, or may hereafter die, in same service, and of the indigent families of those now in service, was taken up on motion of Mr. Shackelford and read a second time. The bill was then amended, and afterwards made the order of the day for Monday next. The following resolution was submitted by Mr. Deane: That the Committee on the Penitentiary inquire into the expediency of hiring the male free negroes in the penitentiary to colliers in the counties of Goochland, Powhatan, and Chesterfield. The hour having arrived for the consideration of the order of the day, that bill was taken up, and its consideration continued until the hour of adjournment.
James W. Dryan (search for this): article 6
Monroe county. --A large and most respectable meeting of the farmers and other citizens of the county of Monroe was held at the Court House of that county on the 21st ult., to take into consideration the condition of the country. The Hon. A. T. Caperton was called to preside, and Jesse Jones was appointed Secretary. Speeches were delivered by Gen. A. A. Chapman, Hon. A. T. Caperton, Col. Jas. W. Dryan, and Captain Philip Thurman, and great enthusiasm and patriot in feeling was exhibited by the meeting. Resolutions identical with those adopted by the Alternate meeting were ordered and adopted without adjoining voice.
N. G. Dulaney (search for this): article 20
Damage at Blountsville. --The Bristol Advocate, of Friday, gives the following as the amount of damage done at Blountsville, Tenn., by the late raiders: It is a sad task for us to state that the larger and better portion of the town of Blountsville was reduced to allies. W. W James, John Powell, John Fain, Sr., Dr. N. G. Dulaney, E P Cawood, Rev. N C Baldwin, Mrs. Martha Rhea, F L Bumgardner, and Maj J G Eans, are among those whose houses and effects were consumed. The court-house, with the offices of the clerks of the county and jail, were also consumed. The loss is immense, not less than half a million of dollars.
Henry Dyke (search for this): article 2
muel Huffman then offered the following, which was adopted unanimously. "Resolved, That the thanks of this meeting are due, and are hereby tendered, to the special committee of the House of Delegates for their exertions in carrying out our wishes." It was here suggested that a committee of three should be appointed to wait on Mayor Mayo, and request him to come forward and address them, which committee consisted of the following gentlemen: Messrs. John Tyler, Robert Scofield, and Henry Dyke. In a short time the committee entered the hall accompanied by His Honor, who delivered an address of about a half hour's length, in which he expressed his heartfelt sympathy with the objects of the meeting, and promised all the aid in his power to further their plans. Although he was not in one sense of the word a mechanic, yet he was a laboring man, and had been such from his infancy; he always had earned his bread by the "sweat of his brow." The Mayor expressed proud gratification
Damage at Blountsville. --The Bristol Advocate, of Friday, gives the following as the amount of damage done at Blountsville, Tenn., by the late raiders: It is a sad task for us to state that the larger and better portion of the town of Blountsville was reduced to allies. W. W James, John Powell, John Fain, Sr., Dr. N. G. Dulaney, E P Cawood, Rev. N C Baldwin, Mrs. Martha Rhea, F L Bumgardner, and Maj J G Eans, are among those whose houses and effects were consumed. The court-house, with the offices of the clerks of the county and jail, were also consumed. The loss is immense, not less than half a million of dollars.
Major-Gen. Earnes, the new Military Governor of Norfolk, arrived in that city on Thursday, and entered upon the duties of his office. The Mobile Tribune announces the death of Col. W. L. Powell, the commander of Fort Morgan.
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