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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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April 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): article 2
first day of July, 1864, east of the Mississippi, and until the first day of August, 1864, wester said river, to fund such Treasury notes above the denomination of five dollars, as were bone fide held by them prior to the 1st of April last; provided that any person claiming the benefits of this act shall make oath before some officer that he or she is a true and loyal citizen of the Confederate States, was the bone fade holder and owner of the notes proposed to be funded prior to the 1st day of April, 1864, and has been prevented by the causes specified in this act from funding said notes within the time allowed by the said act approved February 17, 1864. The bill being taken up, Mr. Arkins, of Tenn, moved to amend by striking out the dates named, and inserting the 1st of January, 1865. Pending the consideration of the subject, Mr. Machen moved that the House adjourn, but withdrew the motion at the request of. Mr. Dupree, who offered a resolution that during the prese
May 10th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
g armies since the battle of Thursday last. Condition of General Jenkins. A private dispatch was received yesterday from Dublin Depot, stating that Brig. Gen, A. C drukles was improving, with every prospect of recovery from his wound received in the recent fight near that place. Another steamer blown up by a torpedo. The Yankee steamers are in bad luck in the Florida rivers. The following official dispatch was received at the War Department yesterday. Charleston, May 10, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper. Gen. Anderson telegraphs me that another of the enemy's steamers was blown into fragments yesterday by a torpedo in the St. Johns, a short distance below Jacksonville. She had two guns aboard, and was lowing a schooner. The latter escaped. It is not known how many lives were lost. This is the third steamer that has met this fate in St. Johns river in the last forty days. Samuel Jones, Maj Gen. A raiding party in Mississippi. The Adjutant General
May 10th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 2
Hdq'rs Jackson Hospitalnear Richmond, May 10th, 1864. Persons having negroes for hire — such as men, boys, and women without children — will do well to call at this Hospital. F. W. Hancock. Surgeon in charge. my 11--2
May 13th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 2
From General Lee's army. [from our Own Correspondent.] Army of Northern Virginia, Spotsylvania C. H., May 13, 1864. On yesterday was fought in front of this modest little village — henceforth to be famous through all coming time--one of the fiercest and most obstinate battles of modern times. It commenced at daylight, and raged and roared with tremendous fury until two o'clock in the afternoon, when the enemy retired from the bloody conflict. Grant made the attack again, as he did at the Wilder uses, and gained a considerable advantage by the suddenness and vigor of the assault enemy in the day; but with this exception, he was repulsed with a loss that will carry mourning to thousands of Northern and European hearthstones, and dismay and confusion to the tyrants and demagogues whose hosts he leads. The Confederates failed at one point only — partly from accident, party from mistake, and partly, I fear, from lack of spirits; but on all other parts of the field they were vi
May 14th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 3
have mocked and whose God they have defied. Their punishment was swift and sure. Would to God that their misguided companions in arms may be profited by the sad scene through which they are called to pass. Yesterday Gen Lee issued the following general orders to his troops, which in the absence of newspapers for a week past, was well received, for the news it contained no less than for the words of cheer spoken by their beloved commander-in-chief: "Headq'rs army Northern Va.,May 14th, 1864. "General Orders-no. 41. "I. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army the series of successes that by the favor of God have been achieved by our armies. "II. A part of the enemy's forces threatening the Valley of Virginia has been routed by Gen Imboden and driven back to the Potomac, with the loss of their train and a number of prisoners. "III. Another body of the enemy, under General Averill, penetrated to the Va. and Tenn railroad at Dublin D
May 16th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
as blown into fragments yesterday by a torpedo in the St. Johns, a short distance below Jacksonville. She had two guns aboard, and was lowing a schooner. The latter escaped. It is not known how many lives were lost. This is the third steamer that has met this fate in St. Johns river in the last forty days. Samuel Jones, Maj Gen. A raiding party in Mississippi. The Adjutant General yesterday received the following official dispatch from General S. D. Lee: Demopolis, May 16, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper. A raiding party from Vicksburg, infantry and cavalry, moved on the Central Railroad, and while Gen. Adams was fighting their main body, near Pickens Station, a cavalry force burnt Boughan's Station and several inconsiderable trestles. Captain Younger, with one hundred and fifty men of Wood's regiment, handsomely repulsed two regiments of infantry from the railroad bridge and saved it. The enemy retreated to Yazoo City. The railroad is but slightly injured. S.
May 16th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 3
[from our Own Correspondent.] Battle Field, Near Spotsylvania C. H., May 16, 1864. Since Thursday last there has been no general engagement. On Saturday night the enemy withdrew from the front on our left, and moved their troops over to the Telegraph road, seizing the Massaponax, and massing a considerable force on our front. During the day yesterday Gen Anderson swung his forces around on our right, (the enemy's left,) and found the enemy "clean gone."--This required new dispositions on our part, which were accordingly made. In making this advance for the purpose of reconnaissance Gen. A.'s forces recaptured thirteen caissons and twenty-one gun carriages. These were the caissons and the gun carriages which were taken from Johnson's division on Thursday last. The enemy, it is supposed, hauled the guns away in wagons, and left the caisson and carriages for want of horses to take them off. To-day I rode over the battle-field in front of Fields's front and found a la
July 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): article 2
amended as to a low citizens of the Confederate States who, by reason of the occupation by the enemy of the sections of country in which they resided, and the interruption of postal and telegraphic communication, or other unavoidable causes, were prevented from obtaining timely information of the requirements of said act, or who were so situated, in consequence of the movements of the enemy, or the casualties of war, as to be unable to comply with the provisions thereof, until the the first day of July, 1864, east of the Mississippi, and until the first day of August, 1864, wester said river, to fund such Treasury notes above the denomination of five dollars, as were bone fide held by them prior to the 1st of April last; provided that any person claiming the benefits of this act shall make oath before some officer that he or she is a true and loyal citizen of the Confederate States, was the bone fade holder and owner of the notes proposed to be funded prior to the 1st day of April, 186
August 1st, 1864 AD (search for this): article 2
ason of the occupation by the enemy of the sections of country in which they resided, and the interruption of postal and telegraphic communication, or other unavoidable causes, were prevented from obtaining timely information of the requirements of said act, or who were so situated, in consequence of the movements of the enemy, or the casualties of war, as to be unable to comply with the provisions thereof, until the the first day of July, 1864, east of the Mississippi, and until the first day of August, 1864, wester said river, to fund such Treasury notes above the denomination of five dollars, as were bone fide held by them prior to the 1st of April last; provided that any person claiming the benefits of this act shall make oath before some officer that he or she is a true and loyal citizen of the Confederate States, was the bone fade holder and owner of the notes proposed to be funded prior to the 1st day of April, 1864, and has been prevented by the causes specified in this act fro
January 1st, 1865 AD (search for this): article 2
ve dollars, as were bone fide held by them prior to the 1st of April last; provided that any person claiming the benefits of this act shall make oath before some officer that he or she is a true and loyal citizen of the Confederate States, was the bone fade holder and owner of the notes proposed to be funded prior to the 1st day of April, 1864, and has been prevented by the causes specified in this act from funding said notes within the time allowed by the said act approved February 17, 1864. The bill being taken up, Mr. Arkins, of Tenn, moved to amend by striking out the dates named, and inserting the 1st of January, 1865. Pending the consideration of the subject, Mr. Machen moved that the House adjourn, but withdrew the motion at the request of. Mr. Dupree, who offered a resolution that during the present emergency the public printer be authorized to have the printing of the House done by private contract. The resolution was adopted. The House then adjourned.
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