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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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in Price to attack Little Rock. [another Dispatch.] Demopolis, May 13. --A dispatch to-day from Col. Scott, via Summit, confirms the account from trans Mississippi. The dispatch says: Gen. Taylor has Banks hemmed in at Alexandria, and a battery below, stopping all communication via Red river. Said battery is supported by Major Bridges's and a part of Polignac's infantry. It captured a transport with a valuable cargo of commismissary stores and 100 prisoners, and the "City Bell" with the 120th Ohio regiment, killing Col. Muda and Col. Bassett, of the Corps de Afrigue, and Col. Ogiel and one Lieut. Colonel in the fight. On the 5th they captured the Warner; also, gunboats 8 and 22 taking from them twenty-one pieces, including eight 32 pounder Parrotts. Their crews were also taken. It was reported at Shreveport that Gen. Smith and the enemy had a fight at Jenkins's Ford, in which we captured several hundred prisoners and many small arms, their pontoon bridg
ews to Gen Lee at Chancellorsville that Sedgwick was moving on his rear from Fredericksburg, was severely wounded early in the morning whilst on his way to the Richmond Howitzers to hold prayers. Including the battle of the Wilderness, we have lost the following general officers: Killed: Brig Gens Stafford of Louisiana, Jones of Virginia, Jenkins and Perrin of South Carolina, and Daniel of North Carolina. Wounded: Lieut Gen. Longstreet of Alabama, and Brig Gens Hays of Louisiana, Benning of Ga, McGowan of S. C., Romseur and Johnson of N. C., and James M Walker, (Stonewall Brigade,) H H Walker, and Pegram, of Va. Captured: Maj Gen Edward Johnson of Ga, and Brig Gen. Geo H Stewart of Md. Gen Lee made more than one narrow escape, his clothing being covered with mud thrown upon him by bursting shells. He will persist in staying near the point of greatest danger. The whole country, with one voice, should protest against such rash exposure of a life in which we are a
Juan Boyle (search for this): article 3
ributions, which we do not doubt have been liberal, have been chiefly confined to those in the city. But there are men still in and near the scene of the fight who need food and articles suited for the badly wounded — such as bandages, lint, stimulation. Many were wounded so badly that they could not be removed, and are still lying in abandoned buildings in and about the field. These need everything.--And it is probable that the battle may be renewed at any moment and increase the numbers of wounded. To meet the wants of these poor fellows a wagon is to leave the Spotswood Hotel today, at 12 o'clock, in charge of Mr. Juan Boyle, to convey whatever our citizens may contribute. Mr. B. is a young Marylander, who served in the war until seriously wounded, and now still an invalid. He has undertaken this plan of conveying relief to the wounded in the field, which he has visited daily. Anything left at the Spotswood to his care will be of great service to the suffering soldiers.
Bridgeford (search for this): article 4
Mutineers. --James Kelly, M Courney, Jas Hurley, Jas Sullivan, Pat Fisherty, Jas Calvin, Mike Shea, Nat Hurley, and John Kellcher, were yesterday sent down from the Army of Northern Virginia on the charge of mutiny, and accompanying them was an order that they should be put into double Irons until tried by court-martial. The parties are members of the 1st Va battalion of regulars, under command of Major D B Bridgeford. The battalion has been up to this time employed as provost guard for the Army of Northern Virginia. It appears that these parties, becoming dissatisfied from some cause, on Monday threw down their arms and refused to do further duty. They were immediately packed off to this city, and have been lodged in Castle Thunder. This is the first time that anything of this kind has occurred in any of our armies.
At Sabine Fort the rebels were turned upon and repulsed, after severe battles, with equal loss on both sides. Marmaduke is on the march to join Price to attack Little Rock. [another Dispatch.] Demopolis, May 13. --A dispatch to-day from Col. Scott, via Summit, confirms the account from trans Mississippi. The dispatch says: Gen. Taylor has Banks hemmed in at Alexandria, and a battery below, stopping all communication via Red river. Said battery is supported by Major Bridges's and a part of Polignac's infantry. It captured a transport with a valuable cargo of commismissary stores and 100 prisoners, and the "City Bell" with the 120th Ohio regiment, killing Col. Muda and Col. Bassett, of the Corps de Afrigue, and Col. Ogiel and one Lieut. Colonel in the fight. On the 5th they captured the Warner; also, gunboats 8 and 22 taking from them twenty-one pieces, including eight 32 pounder Parrotts. Their crews were also taken. It was reported at Shrevepo
f Monday morning, 16th May, near Drewry's Bluff. Killed: Sergt W B Carpenter, co A; John Jenkins, co K. Wounded: W R Clatterback — Cooper, and E S Partlow, co B; V B Collius and F. Hume, co C; G T Stewart and J T Legg, co E; J R. Rayner, W H Brown, J S Marshall, and W M Cox, co F; J W Jenkins, co G; Lt Brown, W H Dickinson, Wm Jackson, and R N Huffman, co K. From Southern Virginia. The situation of affairs in Northern Virginia is given in the letter of our army correspondent, publiLt Brown, W H Dickinson, Wm Jackson, and R N Huffman, co K. From Southern Virginia. The situation of affairs in Northern Virginia is given in the letter of our army correspondent, published elsewhere. No collision has taken place between the confronting armies since the battle of Thursday last. Condition of General Jenkins. A private dispatch was received yesterday from Dublin Depot, stating that Brig. Gen, A. C drukles was improving, with every prospect of recovery from his wound received in the recent fight near that place. Another steamer blown up by a torpedo. The Yankee steamers are in bad luck in the Florida rivers. The following official dispatch was
of which were hard pressed — The two brigades were placed under command of Mahone, who passed around to the Fredericksburg road, and was about to engage to the enemy, when he met the latter coming out probably to take us in flank. An engagement earned immediately, and resulted in the defeat of the enemy, who retired back to the main army, where considerable commotion was produced by the fresh danger with which it was threatened. A division operating against our left, supposed to being to Burnside's corps, was withdrawn and double-quicked across the field to check Mahone. Just before it reached the scene of action, it came within full view of Pogue's and Pegram's guns and not more than twelve hundred yards distant. Twelve pieces were brought to bear upon it in less time then it requires to describe this brilliant episode in the battle. The enemy stood their ground for a moment, then staggered back, and finally broke in the wildest disorder.--What with Mahone's fire to beat and the
C. C. Burton (search for this): article 5
100 Dollars Reward. --Ranaway from the Midlothian Coal Mines, a negro man named Joe, or Joe Hampton. He is about 25 years old, of dark brown color, spare made about 5 feet 10 inches high, with rather large eyes, and somewhat wild expression of countenance, though generally smiling when spoken to. He was bought in January last of Mr. C. C. Burton, near Petersburg, where his friends and connexions are, and he is probably in the neighborhood of that place. The above reward will be paid for his apprehension and delivery in any jail, or to the agent of the Company, at their mines, or to the agent of the Company, at their mines, or in Richmond. my 12--ts
some force in that locality is proved by the act that our pickets below the Bluff were driven in yesterday morning by infantry, but their numerical strength is not believed to be large. At five o'clock yesterday evening the enemy's gunboats were in full view of Chaffin's Bluff. Major General Pickett has recovered from his recent indisposition, and resumed command of his old division. On of the captured Yankee officers, in conversation at Drewry's Bluff, expressed the hope that Butler would be taken prisoner, and manifested no little curiosity to learn what would be done with him in such an event. The Beast appears to be unpopular, even with his own officers. It is reported that he has gone to Fortress Monroe, by way of placing himself beyond the reach of danger. The Southside is now the chief point of interest to residents of the capital, and it is fortunate that we have a commander in that locality in whom the people have full confidence. Gen. Beauregard's plans
Wounded from the battle of Drewry's Bluff. The last of our wounded from the battlefield of Drewry's Bluff were brought to this city last evening. It is roughly estimated that our wounded from this field since Butler landed at Bermuda Hundreds up to this time will reach as high as twelve or fifteen hundred. There has been no time yet to ascertain the number exactly. Last night there were still at Fort Drewry about two hundred wounded Yankees.
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