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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Martha Williams (search for this): article 2
onday, to afford the defendants an opportunity to procure witnesses.--Daniel Collins, alias Michael Stephens, charged with being drunk and lying on a sidewalk, was discharged, upon assuring the Court that he could find his way back to his camp.--John T. Smith, the same above named, was charged with assault and battery upon Julia Selden. Case continued to Monday.--Isaac Levy appeared in discharge of his recognizance entered into Friday morning, to answer the charge of throwing stones at Martha Williams. He gave surety in $150 for his good behavior for twelve months.--The case of Stavethoper & Hansler, charged with creating a unissued, was continued to the 10th.--John H. Cook, charged with violently assaulting and beating Denis Wren, was required to give surety to keep the peace for twelve months, and for his appearance before the Hustings Court in November next to answer an indictment on said charge.--The child, who is not doti capar, had taken something from the defendant — James Ro
John H. Winder (search for this): article 19
Federal ships, which were evidently engaging land batteries, or else firing on defenceless dwellings and people. The firing which took place in the evening our informant cannot well locate. To be sent South. The following is a copy of a dispatch sent to Major Gen. Twiggs by Gen. Winder: Richmond, Aug. 29.--Prisoners of war are to be sent to forts in the vicinity of New Orleans. How many can be there accommodated without crowding? John H. Winder, Brig. Gen. C. S. A. Federal ships, which were evidently engaging land batteries, or else firing on defenceless dwellings and people. The firing which took place in the evening our informant cannot well locate. To be sent South. The following is a copy of a dispatch sent to Major Gen. Twiggs by Gen. Winder: Richmond, Aug. 29.--Prisoners of war are to be sent to forts in the vicinity of New Orleans. How many can be there accommodated without crowding? John H. Winder, Brig. Gen. C. S. A.
Philip Wingert (search for this): article 13
week. During the session one hundred and fourteen Secessionists were indicted. The present population of Charleston, S. C., is 48,160. As many as 5,000 are absent from the city, owing to the war and other causes. Lewis P. Fiery, of Washington county, Md., declines the appointment of Major of the 1st Regiment of the Potomac Home Guards. Crittenden Coleman, a grandson of Senator Crittenden, died at Pensacola recently. He was a private in a Florida company. On Sunday, the 25th of August, a new Lutheran Church was dedicated in Woodsboro,' Frederick county, Md. A salute was fired at Albany, N. Y., on Monday, by order of Gov. Morgan, in honor of the victory of Cape Hatteras. Philip Wingert and Joseph Arnold, two old citizens of Hagerstown, Md., died last week. Jacob Aims, President of the Butchers' and Drevers' Bank, New York, died last Monday at an advanced age. John Cohagen, who died in Alexandria recently, was the oldest citizen of that place.
een Richmond and the army of the Potomac. The passport privilege is cut off entirely to civilians, and even communication per mail seems to be very much restricted. From the Northwest the army at last dates remained in the position it has occupied for some weeks. There have been insurmountable difficulties in the way of advancing, and the opposing armies have been eyeing each other closely. We shall hear soon, we conjecture, of some movement of a decided character. From Floyd and Wise there is nothing especially interesting since the engagement at Cross Lanes. We have rumors daily as thick as blackberries. It is wonderful how many lies are set afloat, where they come from or who makes them are questions that there is no answering. Some are astounding exaggerations of unimportant news; others are manufactured out of the whole cloth. The wags engaged in this fabrication, which involves neither wit nor humor, palm many stories on the War Department; but the inquirer a
ening last: This morning the Government received a telegram from General Rosencranz, embracing information that he was then, with a considerable portion of his command, at a point half-way between Bulltown and Flatwoods, on his way to attack Wise and Floyd, or either of them who might be in the vicinity of Summerville or Gauley bridge. He started from Clarksburg (his headquarters) upon this expedition, leaving an ample force to protect the Cheat Mountain pass, in Lee's front. By this time he has doubtless joined General Cox, and the thus increased Union force is probably up with the enemy, if the latter has not executed another of Wise's favorite and famous "thorough-bred" movements (to the rear.) Yesterday afternoon, between 6 and 7 o'clock, Beauregard threw a considerable force within three-fourths of a mile of General McClellan's pickets in front of the Chain Bridge. The long roll was beaten, and every preparation was made to meet the enemy, not only by our troops
d in behalf of the fair doners, by his Honor Mayor Lamb, whose impromptu address was very eloquent and appropriate. J. E. Ford, Esq., received the beautiful banner, unfuried its bright and gay colors to the breeze, and responded in a brief address, adadmirably suited to the occasion. I learn that there are large and daily accessions to the Federal forces at Fort Monroe, that there is still a considerable fleet of war vessels in the Roads, and about five lying off Newport News. Possibly Wool and Picayune are really preparing for a fight, and may shortly have the temerity to attempt an attack on our powerful fortifications, vainly hoping to gets possession of the Navy-Yard, and for a chance to "burn Norfolk." It is most ardently hoped by the warlike regions congregated hereabouts that the Hessians will really give our boys a chance to fight, for they are really suffering for the want of it, and many declare that they will not return to their homes before they assist in giving the
Gen. Wool. --We cannot imagine a more uncomfortable death-bed than has fallen to the lot of the venerable sinner, the late Lieutenant General of the U. S. forces. It was not enough that the "Ge beside Joyce Heth, the Woolly Horse, and the Mermaid in Barnum's Museum, but; to crown all, old Wool, whom he hates worse than he ever did the devil, is resuscitated placed in command at Old Point, several sand-banks in North Carolina. It is only a little while ago that Scott, aged 75, ordered Wool, also 75, to retire from New York to Troy, on account of his great age and infirmities. The Lieurations of his youthful rival; but whose turn is it to laugh now? The successful foray got up by Wool upon the sand-banks cannot possibly afflict the North Carolinians as much as it hurts Gen. Scott.Gen. Scott.--We unite with him in the cordial hope that the equinoctial storm may soon throw sand in Wool's eyes, and sprinkle a drop or two of water on the parched tongue of the Lieutenant General.
Denis Wren (search for this): article 2
s camp.--John T. Smith, the same above named, was charged with assault and battery upon Julia Selden. Case continued to Monday.--Isaac Levy appeared in discharge of his recognizance entered into Friday morning, to answer the charge of throwing stones at Martha Williams. He gave surety in $150 for his good behavior for twelve months.--The case of Stavethoper & Hansler, charged with creating a unissued, was continued to the 10th.--John H. Cook, charged with violently assaulting and beating Denis Wren, was required to give surety to keep the peace for twelve months, and for his appearance before the Hustings Court in November next to answer an indictment on said charge.--The child, who is not doti capar, had taken something from the defendant — James Roberts, free negro, was ordered to receive fifteen lashes, for assault and battery upon Mary Freeman, his reputed wife, and committed to jail in default of giving surety for his further good behavior.--Tom Griffin, free negro, was required
The army and money Votes of the Federal Congress.[from the London Times, Aug. 19] The armies of Xerxes and the wealth of Solomon would hardly sustain a comparison with the hosts of men and mountains of money which — at any rate, upon paper — are placed at the command of President Lincoln for the suppression of the Southern Confederacy.--We may venture, perhaps, to pass without too rigorous a scrutiny the bold, though some what gasconading, vote by which the intelligence of the defeat at Manassas was received in Congress. The millions so precipitately offered represented, probably, the patriotic resolution of the North to spend its last dollar in the preservation of the Union; but, without pressing these loose figures to their literal import, we are really astounded at the conclusions which are forced upon us by recent reports. It used to be thought that this country had attained an unhappy but unapproachable eminence in national indebtedness. Half our entire expenditure in ord
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