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Emavic Meizaras (search for this): chapter 22
e social reunions gave me the very highest opinion of his profound judgment. He was a man of stately but winning courtesy, although occasionally indulging in pleasantry. At present I can recall but two of those conversations. One evening we received a St. Louis paper containing a general order of General Fremont, announcing his staff — a numerous body, composed largely of gentlemen with foreign names. As, for instance, General Asboth, Colonel De Alma, Majors Kappner and Blome, Captains Emavic Meizaras, Kalmanuezze, Zagonyi, Vanstein Kiste, Sacche, and Geister, Lieutenants Napoleon Westerburg, Addone, Kroger, etc. After the list was read over to him, the general, with an expressive smile, remarked, There is too much tail to that kite. I believe the United States Government soon afterward came to the same conclusion. On another evening, some of his staff were discussing the question of the probable boundary-line of the Confederate States, in the final treaty of peace; none then d
A. B. Moore (search for this): chapter 22
neumonia that impaired his health for years. He was graduated eighth in his class in 1827. The young soldier, after a little delay, resigned his commission, resolving to devote himself to the ministry. At this time he engaged himself to Miss Devereaux, to whom he had been attached from early boyhood; but the marriage was postponed until he had finished his theological education at Alexandria. He was married in May, 1830, and ordained in the Monumental Church, Richmond, Virginia, by Bishop Moore, to whom he became episcopant. To those who remember the stately presence and powerful form of the warrior-bishop thirty years later, it may sound strange to hear that for years he was often disabled by ill-health, and more than once pronounced on the verge of the grave. He was ordained priest May 31, 1831, but soon betook himself, on horseback, to the Valley of Virginia and thence to Philadelphia, in search of health. He was advised by eminent physicians that a sea-voyage and rest fro
J. J. Murphy (search for this): chapter 22
ing was pushed night and day; the entire country was ransacked for small-arms, and metal from which to manufacture field-ordnance; nitre-beds were opened; and, under the supervision of Colonel Hunt, ordnance-officer, arrangements for the manufacture of all kinds of ordnance material were completed. Thus did General Polk obtain a large proportion of the ordnance-supplies for his entire command. Under the management of Major Thomas Peters, quartermaster, aided by Major Anderson, and of Major J. J. Murphy, commissary, quartermaster and commissary supplies were abundantly accumulated. When it is remembered that this successful organization, not only of an army but of the departments necessary to equip an army, was the work of a few months, all being created from the raw material, one can afford to smile at those who pretend that the Southern people are without energy. One of the pleasantest moments of General Polk's life was at Columbus, where General Johnston, after inspecting his
John M. Otey (search for this): chapter 22
steam flouring-mill, and a bagging-factory, and interested himself in other kindred enterprises. He also projected and raised the funds to build the Columbia Institute, a seminary for girls. Though Columbia was seven miles distant, he preached in the church there, and also weekly to the negroes; attending likewise the General Convention, and performing other ministerial duties. These labors brought on two attacks of illness, in May, 1836, and he was obliged to desist. But he persuaded Bishop Otey to take the church in Columbia, while he still preached to his own servants, and devoted himself to good works. He was, in very truth, a pillar of his Church; and his genial and affectionate temper cast a pleasant light over his happy and hospitable household, and throughout his neighborhood. In 1838 he was made Missionary Bishop of the Southwest, and was consecrated on the 8th of December. Though he had embarrassed himself by a security debt for $30,000, his means were still ample,
Thomas Peters (search for this): chapter 22
ensive or defensive operations, as occasion might require. Recruiting was pushed night and day; the entire country was ransacked for small-arms, and metal from which to manufacture field-ordnance; nitre-beds were opened; and, under the supervision of Colonel Hunt, ordnance-officer, arrangements for the manufacture of all kinds of ordnance material were completed. Thus did General Polk obtain a large proportion of the ordnance-supplies for his entire command. Under the management of Major Thomas Peters, quartermaster, aided by Major Anderson, and of Major J. J. Murphy, commissary, quartermaster and commissary supplies were abundantly accumulated. When it is remembered that this successful organization, not only of an army but of the departments necessary to equip an army, was the work of a few months, all being created from the raw material, one can afford to smile at those who pretend that the Southern people are without energy. One of the pleasantest moments of General Polk's
was mainly composed of a part of the Tennessee State army, together with some few Confederate troops in Mississippi. General Pillow, as the representative of the Tennessee State forces, was in chief command at Memphis; and the credit of all that hadssissippians under Brigadier-General Charles Clark. Polk had taken command on July 13th, and, two weeks after, sent General Pillow with 6,000 men to New Madrid, on the right bank of the Mississippi. This point was important, because its occupations irregular command. It has already been seen that this plan failed through want of cooperation. Both Generals Polk and Pillow felt the pressing necessity for the occupation of Columbus, and on August 28th Pillow wrote to Polk urging its immediate hese positions. From the nature of the surrounding country the larger portion of the work was required upon Columbus and Pillow; and a proportionate amount was put on No. 10 and New Madrid; so that when the time came to occupy them, they, as well as
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 22
Chapter 21: General Polk and Columbus, Kentucky. Leonidas Polk. his ancestry, birth, and education. marriage, Ordination, and traLeonidas Polk. his ancestry, birth, and education. marriage, Ordination, and travels. farmer, Manufacturer, and Preacher. Missionary Bishop. Bishop of Louisiana. pecuniary losses. University of the South. Sugar and essee. services. force. occupation of Columbus. River-defenses. Polk's subsequent career. Governor Reynolds's recollections of General Johnston at Columbus. his plans. anecdotes. habits. As General Polk felt unwilling to leave his post at Columbus, just at this juncture, aining, and a bold, aggressive spirit, every inch a soldier. General Polk's great services, his close public and private relations with thonly one side or the other, warrant a more extended notice. Leonidas Polk was descended from a family noted in our Revolutionary annals. ature and man, and to maintain its rights against all odds. Leonidas Polk was the fourth son of Colonel William Polk, and was born in Ral
Thomas Polk (search for this): chapter 22
It came from the north of Ireland about 1722, to Maryland; and about 1753, Thomas, the son of William Polk, found a congenial home in the Scotch-Irish settlement of Mecklenburg County, in the province of North Carolina. Here he married and prospered, attaining wealth and eminence among his people. It may be recollected that for Mecklenburg County is claimed the honor of making the first Declaration of Independence from the mother-country. According to the historian of these events, Colonel Thomas Polk convoked the meeting that took this first step in treason. He was a prime mover for resistance, an active patriot and soldier in the War of the Revolution, and rose to the rank of brigadier-general in the State forces. William Polk, his eldest son, then a lad not seventeen years old, left college in April, 1775, to become a lieutenant in the South Carolina line. He was actively engaged to the end of the war, toward the close as lieutenant-colonel, and was twice desperately wound
William Polk (search for this): chapter 22
t 1722, to Maryland; and about 1753, Thomas, the son of William Polk, found a congenial home in the Scotch-Irish settlement the rank of brigadier-general in the State forces. William Polk, his eldest son, then a lad not seventeen years old, let all odds. Leonidas Polk was the fourth son of Colonel William Polk, and was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, April 10,d alone save his life, and at once sailed for Europe. Mr. Polk remained more than a year abroad, traveling in France, Gerge tract of land in Maury County, Tennessee, which Colonel William Polk divided between four of his sons. Here these brethations, not necessary to be recounted here, had crippled Bishop Polk's large estate; but his pecuniary losses neither shook hpe and zeal in all good works. The chief business of Bishop Polk's life for five or six years before the war, though not ield of battle. Considerable surprise was created by Bishop Polk's action in taking a military command early in the war.
William M. Polk (search for this): chapter 22
his episcopal work. In November, 1861, General Polk, feeling that there was no longer a necessi coming out of the building, a friend asked Bishop Polk, sarcastically, Do you call that the gospely be discovered the signs of an heroic nature. Polk believed that no calling gave the citizen exempthan the best for General Johnston. When General Polk took command in West Tennessee, his departmas in a position to be of signal service to General Polk in the work that lay before him. Isham G. Hon belonging to West Tennessee coming under General Polk's jurisdiction. He at once set himself to mbryo. Seizing upon the materials at hand, General Polk set himself to work to create out of it an failed through want of cooperation. Both Generals Polk and Pillow felt the pressing necessity forthe West. Whoever was at the head, it was upon Polk and Hardee, the corps commanders, as upon two mght of organization and discipline rested. General Polk was made a lieutenant-general, October 10, [23 more...]
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