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R. Bruce Ricketts (search for this): chapter 13
marching to join him. McDowell, having information of my approach, delayed his march, detaching Ricketts's division to hold me in check at Thoroughfare Gap. The first passage at arms of the day wa the south side. Drayton's brigade was held in rear. By the time the troops were so disposed, Ricketts's division was well deployed along the plateau on the east. Benning put Major Waddell, withPass and the crossing of one of Hood's brigades, gave the Confederates commanding position, and Ricketts withdrew in time to escape disaster. About six o'clock McDowell put his troops on the countand to a place of rest. At one A. M. the division was withdrawn and marched back to Manassas. Ricketts, finding himself in isolated position at Gainesville, left at daylight and marched to Bristoe. e impression that King's division was still occupying the ground of the late conflict, and that Ricketts's division was not far away; but these divisions had been removed to points before mentioned, t
T. L. Rosser (search for this): chapter 13
rch to that point, while the left marched up in search of more favorable points. As we were leaving Kelly's the enemy made a dash to cross, and engaged some of the brigades in a sharp fight, intending to delay our movements, but the main column marched on, while this affair was still in progress. By mutual consent the fight subsided, both parties joined their proper commands and proceeded on their upward march, each on its own side of the stream. At Beverley's Ford, Stuart's cavalry under Rosser crossed and made a lodgement on the east bank, but the near approach of the enemy's column threatening, before the infantry could get up in support, made necessary the abandonment of the ground, and the left wing continued to feel along higher up for a crossing. Passing up, Trimble's brigade was left at Beverley's as guard to Jackson's rear. The enemy, conceiving an opportunity, crossed at Freeman's Ford and attacked Trimble. Meanwhile, a detachment had been called for from the right win
Eliakim P. Scammon (search for this): chapter 13
of New Jersey, just landed from the cars from Alexandria, advanced and made a desperate effort to recover the lost position and equipage at Manassas Junction. Field's, Archer's, Pender's, and Thomas's brigades, moving towards the railroad bridge, met Taylor's command and engaged it, at the same time moving towards its rear, threatening to cut off its retreat. It was driven back after a fierce struggle, General Taylor, commanding, mortally wounded. Part of the Kanawha division under General Scammon was ordered to its support, but was only in time to assist in its retreat. Reporting this affair, General Jackson said,--The advance was made with great spirit and determination, and under a leader worthy of a better cause. The spoils were then quietly divided, such as could be consumed or hauled off, and the balance given to the torch. I marched from the Rappahannock, following on Jackson's trail, and camped at White Plains. The march during the day was delayed about an hour b
t cut off by the high water, General Pope extended his right, under Sigel, Banks, and Reno, in search of Jackson up the river, who meanwhile the 27th: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Portered McDowell, with his own corps, including Reynolds's division and Sigel's corps, to march so as to be at Gainesville at nightfall; Reno's cand wounded were cared for. The noise made by this affair caused Sigel to countermarch his corps, and otherwise delayed the march of McDow About six o'clock McDowell put his troops on the countermarch, Sigel's corps and Reynolds's division back by the New Market road for itshanged the front of his right division, and, noting the movement of Sigel's troops along the New Market road, called out Ewell with his brigaupported by Hooker. McDowell's operations of the afternoon left Sigel's corps and Reynolds's division in the vicinity of the field of Kin
them retreat. A deadly fire from three sides welcomed and drove us back. Ibid., p. 371. After night Gibbon held his front by a line of skirmishers, and withdrew his command to a place of rest. At one A. M. the division was withdrawn and marched back to Manassas. Ricketts, finding himself in isolated position at Gainesville, left at daylight and marched to Bristoe. Jackson moved his forces at daylight, and reestablished his line behind the unfinished railroad, his own division under General Stark, Ewell's under General Lawton, with A. P. Hill on his left. General Pope's orders for the night directed the march of Kearny's division from Centreville by the turnpike at one A. M., to reinforce the troops against Jackson; the other division of Heintzelman's corps (Hooker's) to march by the same route at daylight, and to be followed by the corps under Reno. These orders were urgent, and directed that the commands should move promptly, leaving fragments behind if all could not be go
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 13
of march continuous skirmishing cavalry commander Stuart gets into General Pope's Headquarters ands own side of the stream. At Beverley's Ford, Stuart's cavalry under Rosser crossed and made a lodg vicinity of General Pope's headquarters. General Stuart was ordered over, with parts of his brigadion of those that had joined him, but General Stuart's especial pleasure and pride were manifested of the uniform coat and hat of General Pope. Stuart rode along the line showing them, and proclaim rear at Manassas Junction, his supply depot. Stuart's cavalry was ordered to follow during the nig passed Thoroughfare Gap to Gainesville, where Stuart joined him with all of his cavalry. From Gainhe service, and set out at once on the march. Stuart was afterwards ordered to join Trimble with hi000; total, 50,000, with 3000 of cavalry under Stuart. On the 26th I moved up to and crossed at passage at arms of the day was between part of Stuart's cavalry, supported by B. T. Johnson's infant
lton, ordered to join Reno, and Heintzelman's (Third) corps, ten thousand strong, at Warrenton Junction. The Sixth (Franklin's) Corps, ten thousand strong, Army of the Potomac, was at Alexandria awaiting transportation, as were the divisions of Sturgis, ten thousand, and Cox, seven thousand,--the latter from West Virginia. General Pope asked to have Franklin's corps march by the Warrenton turnpike to join him, and sent instructions to different parties to see that the guards in his rear were s Pope stood on the evening of the 27th: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Porter's corps, 18,000,--in all 54,500 men, with 4000 cavalry; Platt's brigade, Sturgis's division, which joined him on the 26th, not included. In his rear was Jackson, 20,000; in front on the Rappahannock was my 25,000; R. H. Anderson's reserve division, 5000; total, 50,000, with 3000 of cavalry under Stuart. On the 26th I mo
William B. Taliaferro (search for this): chapter 13
n Sulphur Springs route. On the 27th, Jackson marched at daylight to Manassas Junction with his own division, under Taliaferro, and A. P. Hill's, leaving Ewell's at Bristoe Station, with orders to withdraw if severely pressed. Approaching the Juwas first to move at 12.20 A. M. He applied the torch to the stores of provisions, and marched with his division, under Taliaferro, by the New Market Sudley Springs road across the Warrenton turnpike, and pitched bivouac on a line from near Groveton, at daylight towards Centreville, crossed Bull Run, marched up some distance, recrossed, and joined Jackson, forming on Taliaferro's left. After the morning fires of the bivouac burned out, Jackson's position could not be seen except upon near appros to give his number lost, but acknowledges his severe loss in the division commanders, General Ewell losing a leg, and Taliaferro severely wounded. During the night the Federal commander reported to his subordinates that McDowell had intercepted
W. H. Taylor (search for this): chapter 13
ery came from the direction of Centreville, and tried to make trouble at long range, but was driven off by superior numbers. Then a brigade of infantry under General Taylor, of New Jersey, just landed from the cars from Alexandria, advanced and made a desperate effort to recover the lost position and equipage at Manassas Junction. Field's, Archer's, Pender's, and Thomas's brigades, moving towards the railroad bridge, met Taylor's command and engaged it, at the same time moving towards its rear, threatening to cut off its retreat. It was driven back after a fierce struggle, General Taylor, commanding, mortally wounded. Part of the Kanawha division undeGeneral Taylor, commanding, mortally wounded. Part of the Kanawha division under General Scammon was ordered to its support, but was only in time to assist in its retreat. Reporting this affair, General Jackson said,--The advance was made with great spirit and determination, and under a leader worthy of a better cause. The spoils were then quietly divided, such as could be consumed or hauled off, and the
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
of the ground, and the left wing continued to feel along higher up for a crossing. Passing up, Trimble's brigade was left at Beverley's as guard to Jackson's rear. The enemy, conceiving an opportunity, crossed at Freeman's Ford and attacked Trimble. Meanwhile, a detachment had been called for from the right wing. Hood, with his own and Whiting's brigade, was ordered, and was in time to join in Trimble's fight, which ended in repulse of the adventurous force. The east banks of the Rappahannock lifted quite above those occupied by the Confederates, giving advantageous position to the Union artillery fire, and offering no point above Kelly's Ford to force a crossing. When the left wing marched from Rappahannock Bridge, the enemy crossed a considerable force to the west bank, and covered it with a number of superior batteries well posted on the east side. To dislodge that force I put a number of batteries into action, including the Washington Artillery, and, later, part of th
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