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October, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 19
on firmly for a long time, but, Wise's House, South Mountain battle-field. this is a view of Wise's House when the writer sketched it, at the beginning of October, 1866. it is on the Sharpsburg road, about a mile and a half South from Keedy's tavern, on the pike at Turner's Gap. finally, by hard and persistent fighting Cox g shows the appearance of that portion of the battle-field on South Mountain, where General Reno was killed, as it appeared when the writer visited it, early in October, 1866. the field was dotted with evergreen shrubs. The place where Reno fell is marked by a stone set up by Daniel Wise, whose son owned the land. It is seen nearn by the National artillery, and View of the Antietam battle-ground. this was the appearance of the scene when the author sketched it, at the beginning of October, 1866. the view is from the grove, mentioned in the text, from which McClellan watched the battle, according to the statement of Mr. Pry, who accompanied him. The b
January 26th, 1868 AD (search for this): chapter 19
r. Lincoln was perplexed. He appreciated the patriotism and soldierly qualities of Burnside, yet he could not consent to the suspension or dismissal of the officers named, even had there been greater personal provocation. He talked with Burnside as a friend and brother, and it was finally arranged that the General should be relieved of the command of the Army of the Potomac, and await orders for further service. This was done, and Major-General Hooker succeeded him in the command. January 26, 1868. By the order relieving Burnside from the command, Franklin was also relieved. See also was General Sumner, at his own request. He soon afterward died, at Syracuse, New York. The arrangement made at that time, whereby the country might be best served, was highly creditable to the President and to General Burnside. Here we will leave the Army of the Potomac in winter quarters on the Rappahannock, and consider the stirring events in the great Valley of the Mississippi since the sie
E. P. Alexander (search for this): chapter 19
t in June, 1866. The stone wall is on the City side of the road on which the Confederates were posted. The tents of a burial-party, encamped nearer the Rappahannock at the time, are seen in the distance. The immediate care of this important point was intrusted to General Ransom. The Washington (New Orleans) Artillery, under Colonel Walton, occupied the redoubts on the crest of Marye's Hill, and those on the heights to the right and left were held by part of the Reserve artillery, Colonel E. P. Alexander's battalion, and the division batteries of Anderson, Ransom, and McLaws. A. P. Hill, of Jackson's corps, was post ed be tween Hood's right a nd Hamilton's crossing on the railway, his front line under Pen der, Lane, and Archer occupying the edge of a wood. Lieutenant Walker, with fourteen pieces of artillery, was posted near the right, supported by two Virginia regiments, under Colonel Brockenborough. A projecting wood at the front of the general lines was held by Lane's brigade.
R. H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 19
Longstreet was to follow the same road to Boonsborough, westward of the South Mountain; while McLaws, with his own and Anderson's division, was to march to Middletown, and then press on toward Harper's Ferry and possess himself of Maryland Heights,its commander, who was killed early in the action, that it fell back in confusion, and its place was supplied by that of Anderson, supported by Rhodes and Ripley. These held the position firmly for a long time, but, Wise's House, South Mountain bae appeared on the crest of the Elk Mountain, two or three miles northward, and soon commenced skirmishing, McLaws and Anderson had evacuated Pleasant Valley on the day when Jackson captured Martinsburg. McLaws at once ordered Kershaw to take his s brigade, as gallantly came to his support and relief. Hill was now re-enforced by about four thousand men, under R. H. Anderson, and the struggle was fierce for a while, the Confederates trying to seize a ridge on the National left for the purpo
Robert Anderson (search for this): chapter 19
lled them to retire.--Lee's Report, volume I. of the Reports of the Army of Northern Virginia, pages 88 and 89. Its left was composed of Longstreet's corps, with Anderson's division resting upon the river, and those of McLaws, Pickett, and Hood, extending to the right in the order named. Ransom's division supported Scene in Frell, and those on the heights to the right and left were held by part of the Reserve artillery, Colonel E. P. Alexander's battalion, and the division batteries of Anderson, Ransom, and McLaws. A. P. Hill, of Jackson's corps, was post ed be tween Hood's right a nd Hamilton's crossing on the railway, his front line under Pen der, Lamaking the first attack. At noon he ordered out French's division, to be followed and supported by Hancock. French's was composed of the brigades of Kimball, Anderson, and Palmer. Hancock's was composed of the brigades of Zook, Meagher, and Caldwell. Kimball's brigade led, and the whole force, as it moved swiftly to the assau
ortant point was intrusted to General Ransom. The Washington (New Orleans) Artillery, under Colonel Walton, occupied the redoubts on the crest of Marye's Hill, and those on the heights to the right and left were held by part of the Reserve artillery, Colonel E. P. Alexander's battalion, and the division batteries of Anderson, Ransom, and McLaws. A. P. Hill, of Jackson's corps, was post ed be tween Hood's right a nd Hamilton's crossing on the railway, his front line under Pen der, Lane, and Archer occupying the edge of a wood. Lieutenant Walker, with fourteen pieces of artillery, was posted near the right, supported by two Virginia regiments, under Colonel Brockenborough. A projecting wood at the front of the general lines was held by Lane's brigade. Hill's reserve was composed of the brigades of Thomas and Gregg, with a part of Field's. The divisions of Early and Taliaferro composed Jackson's second line, and D. H. Hill's was his reserve. The cannon of the latter were well posted
nd the testimony concerning the delay in moving the Army of the Potomac, and the commander's continual complaints of a lack of men and supplies to make pursuit or fighting a safe operation, one is reminded of the famous letter of Napoleon to Marshal Augereau, on the 21st of February, 1814, which gives his idea of making war. The marshal had given excuses similar to those of McClellan for inaction. Napoleon said:-- What! Six hours after receiving the first troops from Spain you are not yet in Six hours rest is quite enough for them. I conquered at Nangis with a brigade of dragoons coming from Spain, who from Bayonne had not drawn rein. Do you say that the six battalions from Nimes want clothes and equipage, and are uninstructed? Augereau, what miserable excuses! I have destroyed 80,000 enemies with battalions of conscripts, scarcely clothed, and without cartridge-boxes. The National Guard are pitiful. I have here 4,000 from Angers and Bretagne, in round hats, without cartridg
ides, expected pontoons had not arrived, and a sudden rain might cut off the occupying force from the main army, and expose it to capture by the rapidly approaching legions of Lee. So no attempt to cross was made. Without a shadow of truth, General Lee encouraged his troops and the deceived people by solemnly declaring in his official report that the advance of General Sumner reached Falmouth on the afternoon of the, 17th, and attempted to cross the Rappahannock, but was driven back by Colonel Ball with the Fifteenth Virginia cavalry, four companies of Mississippi infantry, and Lewis's light battery. Four days after his arrival, when a greater portion of the National army was near Falmouth, and its cannon commanded Fredericksburg, Sumner demanded the surrender of Farmers' bank, Fredericksburg. the city. Nov. 21. The authorities replied, that while it should not be used for offensive operations against the. National army, any attempt of that army to occupy it would be stoutly
Nathanibl P. Banks (search for this): chapter 19
the 3d, and immediately put his troops in motion to meet the threatened peril. His army was thrown into Maryland north of Washington, and on the 7th, leaving General Banks in command at the National capital, he hastened to the field, making his Headquarters that night with the Sixth Corps at Rockville. His army, composed of his s, under General Franklin. The First Corps (McDowell's) was placed under General Hooker; the Ninth, of Burnside's command, was under General Reno; the Twelfth was Banks's, which was now under General Mansfield, who had not before taken the field. Porter's corps remained in Washington until the 12th, and did not join the army untin communicated by traitors in his army to secessionists in Washington, and by them to Lee, and he abandoned that movement and proposed to cross the Rappahannock at Banks's and United States fords, above Fredericksburg, and endeavor to flank his foe and give him battle. For that purpose his army was speedily put in motion. The Gra
Dame Barbara (search for this): chapter 19
est of all in Frederick town, She took up the flag the men hauled down; In her attic window the staff she set, To show that one heart was loyal yet. Up the street came the rebel tread, Stonewall Jackson riding ahead. Under his slouched hat left and right He glanced: the old flag met his sight. “Halt!” the dust-brown ranks stood fast. “Fire!” out blazed the rifle-blast. It shivered the window, pane and sash; It rent the banner with seam and gash. Quick, as it fell from the broken staff, Dame Barbara snatched the silken scarf; She leaned far out on the window-sill, And shook it forth with a royal will. “Shoot, if you must, this old gray head, But spare your country's flag,” she said. A shade of sadness, a blush of shame, Over the face of the leader came; The nobler nature within him stirred To life at that woman's deed and word; “Who touches a hair of yon gray head Dies like a dog! March on!” he said. All day long through Frederick street Sounded the tread of marching feet
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