hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 901 143 Browse Search
T. J. Jackson 874 6 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 810 42 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 588 6 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 529 95 Browse Search
James Longstreet 468 2 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 465 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 428 0 Browse Search
J. R. Trimble 377 3 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 310 68 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 7,081 total hits in 666 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...
October 10th (search for this): chapter 64
s of the enemy. Our corps being left to hold Atlanta, we commenced the construction of an inner line of forts and rifle-pits, our camp still remaining near the old outer line, which we had strengthened and improved by slashing and abattis. From the third until the twentieth of October, with the exception of a few days, one thousand men from this division worked daily upon the inner line, which was formidably strong. The interruption of our communications by Hood's army, had, by the tenth of October, caused a great scarcity of forage in Atlanta, and to prevent the total sacrifice of our horses and mules, it became necessary to draw entirely upon the surrounding country. The first foraging expedition for this purpose was sent out under my command on the eleventh October. October 11.--At seven A. M. I left Atlanta, in command of a foraging expedition, composed as follows: Detachments from my division under Colonel H. A. Barnum, one thousand and fifty men; Second brigade, Fir
October 11th (search for this): chapter 64
ition in the rebel earthworks from the Marietta road to the Sandtown road. October 11.--Accompanied a forage expedition under command of Brigadier-General Geary, ies of the city. October 9 to 10, inclusive.--Remained in same position. October 11.--Marched, at five o'clock A. M., on a foraging expedition to Flat Rock, a di about two miles further to the left, and encamped near the Sandtown road. October 11.--Marched off on Decatur road, in a south-easterly direction; afterward struc foraging expedition for this purpose was sent out under my command on the eleventh October. October 11.--At seven A. M. I left Atlanta, in command of a foraging eOctober 11.--At seven A. M. I left Atlanta, in command of a foraging expedition, composed as follows: Detachments from my division under Colonel H. A. Barnum, one thousand and fifty men; Second brigade, First division, under Colonel cular incident, and the regiment reported back on September twenty-second. October 11th.--The brigade, except the Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania veteran volunteers, con
October 12th (search for this): chapter 64
October 11.--Marched, at five o'clock A. M., on a foraging expedition to Flat Rock, a distance of sixteen miles. October 12.--Crossed the Flat Rock Shoals, turned to the right four miles, and helped load two hundred wagons with corn. Octoberd struck off to right, on road to Flat Rock, halting at eight P. M., near South River, a distance of fifteen miles. October 12.--Crossed South-River at Clark's Mill, Flat Rock, De Kalb County, marching southeasterly five miles to border of Henry in a position strengthened by rail defences; and from this place as a depot, my foraging operations were conducted. October 12.--Crossed South-River at Flat Rock, and during the day loaded about three hundred wagons within a distance of three milshed. The regiment participated in the work of destroying the railroad between Chattahoochee and Atlanta, on the twelfth of October. Probably tore up three fourths of a mile of the railroad track. November 14.--Marched to Atlanta and joined th
October 13th (search for this): chapter 64
Rock Shoals, turned to the right four miles, and helped load two hundred wagons with corn. October 13 and 14.--Filled balance of wagons, one hundred and twenty-five in number, and returned with thsecond to December twenty-second inclusive: Privates, Thomas Benham, Co. A, taken prisoner October thirteenth; William Adlum, Co. B, taken prisoner October thirteenth; William Hoerhold, Co. B, committOctober thirteenth; William Hoerhold, Co. B, committed suicide October twentieth ; Thomas Duffy, Co. C, taken prisoner October twenty-third; sergeant Edward Tuttle, Co. A, accidentally shot in hand November ninth; privates, Gilbert Shaw, Co. B, taken png the day, and returned with them to encampment of night previous, recrossing South-River. October 13.--Crossed South-River again after forage, loaded and guarded train, and after sunset marched t that the enemy's main body near me was seven hundred strong, with two pieces of artillery. October 13.--At day-break, leaving the laden trains under guard at the depot, I recrossed the river, load
October 14th (search for this): chapter 64
s, eighteen miles from Atlanta, loaded five hundred wagons principally with corn and oats, and returned to the city October fourteenth. October 22.--Ordered by Major-General Slocum, commanding Twentieth corps, to proceed with the brigade and reinfd guarded train, and after sunset marched ten miles on road to Atlanta, and encamped at three A. M. of next morning. October 14.--Marched five miles to camp in Atlanta, Georgia. October 22.--Marched fifteen miles, to near South-River, to reinfohe depot, I recrossed the river, loaded the balance of my wagons, and at eight P. M. commenced my return to Atlanta. October 14.--By one o'clock A. M., I reached a point within six miles of Atlanta, where I halted and rested my command until half-al Geary, which proceeded to the vicinity of Flat Rock Shoals, about twenty miles from Atlanta, and returned on the fourteenth October, without loss, though considerably annoyed by the enemy, bringing in a number of animals and about four hundred and
October 15th (search for this): chapter 64
s of Atlanta, where we halted at four o'clock A. M. of the fourteenth; continued the march at half-past 11 A. M., and arrived in Atlanta at two o'clock P. M. October 15 to 21, inclusive.--Remained in the same camp. October 22.--Marched with the balance of the brigade, at four P. M., on road to Flat Rock Shoals, to cover the nty-first, it was detailed on duty in the fire department, and remained on that duty during the whole time that Atlanta was occupied by our forces. On the fifteenth of October, the regiment went with the brigade on a foraging expedition to Flat Shoals, on which expedition the regiment was gone four days, and loaded thirty-two wagilroad bridge across the Chattahoochee River, during the interval between September twenty-third and the commencement of the campaign just ended. On the fifteenth of October last, I received permission from Major-General Slocum, commanding United States troops at Atlanta, to send out foraging parties on the north side of the Ch
October 16th (search for this): chapter 64
of the military confederate prisoners till October fourth, 1864. During October sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth, we were ordered to go on a foraubsisted on the country. Twenty-one bales of cotton were also brought in. October 16.--Another foraging expedition was sent out under command of Colonel Robinson,re it remained during the occupation of Atlanta. From the fourth to the sixteenth of October, the regiment furnished from seventy to one hundred and ten men daily fo Indiana, a distance of at least one mile. While on this line, up to the sixteenth of October, the regiment was reequipped and fully prepared for another campaign. On the sixteenth of October, the regiment with brigade was reported to Colonel Robinson, commanding a brigade of First division, Twentieth army corps, and under his arthworks of the enemy, went into camp. Nothing of note took place until October sixteenth, when the regiment, with brigade, commanded by myself, accompanied a larg
October 17th (search for this): chapter 64
occupation of Atlanta, my regiment went into camp with the brigade on the east side of the city, near the Augusta Railroad. It occupied this position until October seventeenth, when it marched on an expedition for forage, with a body of troops under command of Brigadier-General Geary. The regiment was absent four days on this exptopped until September twelfth, when we were detailed to take charge of the military confederate prisoners till October fourth, 1864. During October sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth, we were ordered to go on a foraging expedition in charge of Colonel Robinson. On the same we loaded all wagons taken along with co expedition commanded by Colonel Robinson,) the regiment went on a foraging expedition, making a march of sixteen miles, camping at Flat Shoals, South-River. October 17th, 1864.--Moved east five miles; loaded wagons with corn, potatoes, beef, and pork; returned and camped on same ground. October 18th, moved out south seven m
October 18th (search for this): chapter 64
same month, when it returned to the Chattahoochee, and was assigned a position on the south side of the river, protecting the railroad bridge. On the eighteenth day of October, Captain Sedwick, with fifty men, was sent out to recapture a number of horses and mules, which the enemy had driven off, and succeeded in recovering thrnd two mules. Captain George W. Woolley, company F, with a detachment from the regiment, participated in a foraging expedition, which started out on the eighteenth of October, and returned on the twentieth of that month; the teams that were sent out returned loaded with forage. About the last of October, Captain D. W. Sedwick ct Shoals, South-River. October 17th, 1864.--Moved east five miles; loaded wagons with corn, potatoes, beef, and pork; returned and camped on same ground. October 18th, moved out south seven miles; loaded forty wagons with the above-named articles; sent one hundred men out under command of Captain Maze, who flanked and routed
October 19th (search for this): chapter 64
Robinson,) the regiment went on a foraging expedition, making a march of sixteen miles, camping at Flat Shoals, South-River. October 17th, 1864.--Moved east five miles; loaded wagons with corn, potatoes, beef, and pork; returned and camped on same ground. October 18th, moved out south seven miles; loaded forty wagons with the above-named articles; sent one hundred men out under command of Captain Maze, who flanked and routed a squad of the enemy's cavalry; returned to same camp. October 19th, returned to Atlanta; resumed picket and fatigue until the twenty-sixth October, 1864; went on a foraging expedition with the brigade, commanded by Major Brant, Eighty-fifth Indiana; the expedition commanded by General Geary, marching twenty-four miles. October 27th. Detailed from brigade with other regiments, to guard and load one hundred wagons, which was done with the best of corn fodder, etc. ; returned to same camp. October 28th, marched seven miles past Stone Mountain. Oct
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...