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Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 22
prevented any movement by the enemy on Pocahontas, by the way of Chalk Bluffs. While it was expected to make the campaign in Tennessee defensive, the intention was to carry on active operations in Missouri by a combined movement of the armies of Price, McCulloch, Hardee, and Pillow, aided by Jeff Thompson's irregular command. It has already been seen that this plan failed through want of cooperation. Both Generals Polk and Pillow felt the pressing necessity for the occupation of Columbus, an yet an able commander should always take into consideration, and be minutely and accurately informed of, the condition, resources, etc., of the country in which he operates. At that time General Johnston contemplated a campaign in Missouri, General Price having taken Lexington about that time, and Fremont being the Federal commander in this State. I accepted the position on his staff with the understanding that I should not be expected to serve on it, except in such a campaign. We both thou
Thomas C. Reynolds (search for this): chapter 22
Bishop-soldier. appearance. anecdotes. command in West Tennessee. services. force. occupation of Columbus. River-defenses. Polk's subsequent career. Governor Reynolds's recollections of General Johnston at Columbus. his plans. anecdotes. habits. As General Polk felt unwilling to leave his post at Columbus, just at thral, October 10, 1862, and was killed by a shell aimed at him, June 14, 1864, near Marietta, Georgia, while boldly reconnoitring the enemy's position. Hon. Thomas C. Reynolds, the constitutional Lieutenant-Governor of Missouri, and, after Governor Jackson's death, its legal Governor, has given the writer his recollections of General Johnston at Columbus. Himself a gentleman of fine talents and culture, Governor Reynolds's opinions and impressions cannot fail to receive consideration: My recollections of your illustrious father are of little or no historical interest. Soon after he arrived at Columbus, Kentucky, he did me the honor of inviting me t
is profound judgment. He was a man of stately but winning courtesy, although occasionally indulging in pleasantry. At present I can recall but two of those conversations. One evening we received a St. Louis paper containing a general order of General Fremont, announcing his staff — a numerous body, composed largely of gentlemen with foreign names. As, for instance, General Asboth, Colonel De Alma, Majors Kappner and Blome, Captains Emavic Meizaras, Kalmanuezze, Zagonyi, Vanstein Kiste, Sacche, and Geister, Lieutenants Napoleon Westerburg, Addone, Kroger, etc. After the list was read over to him, the general, with an expressive smile, remarked, There is too much tail to that kite. I believe the United States Government soon afterward came to the same conclusion. On another evening, some of his staff were discussing the question of the probable boundary-line of the Confederate States, in the final treaty of peace; none then doubted their achievement of independence. The general'
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 22
n of the work was required upon Columbus and Pillow; and a proportionate amount was put on No. 10 and New Madrid; so that when the time came to occupy them, they, as well as Fort Pillow, were in a proper state of defense. General Polk's share in this campaign will appear as the events arise. Of his valuable and conspicuous services after the battle of Shiloh, it is not within the scope of this work to give a detailed account. At Perryville, at Murfreesboro, at Chickamauga, in baffling Sherman in February, 1864, and in General J. E. Johnston's retreat from North Georgia, his courage and skill made him one of the main supports of the Confederate cause in the West. Whoever was at the head, it was upon Polk and Hardee, the corps commanders, as upon two massive pillars, that the weight of organization and discipline rested. General Polk was made a lieutenant-general, October 10, 1862, and was killed by a shell aimed at him, June 14, 1864, near Marietta, Georgia, while boldly reconn
iladelphia, in search of health. He was advised by eminent physicians that a sea-voyage and rest from all labor could alone save his life, and at once sailed for Europe. Mr. Polk remained more than a year abroad, traveling in France, Germany, Italy, and England, and returned greatly improved in health, in October, 1832. He which he belonged. He was once at church, where he heard a brother bishop preach, the subject of the discourse being principally the travels of the speaker in Europe. As they were coming out of the building, a friend asked Bishop Polk, sarcastically, Do you call that the gospel? To which he replied: Oh, no! that is the Actserward had parted so widely, moved thereafter with a common purpose to a common end. Their friendship was founded upon mutual esteem. When General Polk came from Europe, he brought with him a beautiful onyx cameo — the head of Washington — which he gave to General Johnston on his return, saying: I could find nothing so appropriat
France (France) (search for this): chapter 22
s later, it may sound strange to hear that for years he was often disabled by ill-health, and more than once pronounced on the verge of the grave. He was ordained priest May 31, 1831, but soon betook himself, on horseback, to the Valley of Virginia and thence to Philadelphia, in search of health. He was advised by eminent physicians that a sea-voyage and rest from all labor could alone save his life, and at once sailed for Europe. Mr. Polk remained more than a year abroad, traveling in France, Germany, Italy, and England, and returned greatly improved in health, in October, 1832. He was still warned that the open air alone would save him, and in 1834 settled as a farmer on a large tract of land in Maury County, Tennessee, which Colonel William Polk divided between four of his sons. Here these brethren dwelt in unity, as affluent farmers. His restless energy remaining unsatisfied by the management of a large estate and many slaves, he established a saw and grist mill, a steam
Maury (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
the Valley of Virginia and thence to Philadelphia, in search of health. He was advised by eminent physicians that a sea-voyage and rest from all labor could alone save his life, and at once sailed for Europe. Mr. Polk remained more than a year abroad, traveling in France, Germany, Italy, and England, and returned greatly improved in health, in October, 1832. He was still warned that the open air alone would save him, and in 1834 settled as a farmer on a large tract of land in Maury County, Tennessee, which Colonel William Polk divided between four of his sons. Here these brethren dwelt in unity, as affluent farmers. His restless energy remaining unsatisfied by the management of a large estate and many slaves, he established a saw and grist mill, a steam flouring-mill, and a bagging-factory, and interested himself in other kindred enterprises. He also projected and raised the funds to build the Columbia Institute, a seminary for girls. Though Columbia was seven miles distant
Mecklenburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
se public and private relations with the subject of this memoir, his anomalous position as bishop and general, and the wide misapprehension of his life and character by those who knew only one side or the other, warrant a more extended notice. Leonidas Polk was descended from a family noted in our Revolutionary annals. It came from the north of Ireland about 1722, to Maryland; and about 1753, Thomas, the son of William Polk, found a congenial home in the Scotch-Irish settlement of Mecklenburg County, in the province of North Carolina. Here he married and prospered, attaining wealth and eminence among his people. It may be recollected that for Mecklenburg County is claimed the honor of making the first Declaration of Independence from the mother-country. According to the historian of these events, Colonel Thomas Polk convoked the meeting that took this first step in treason. He was a prime mover for resistance, an active patriot and soldier in the War of the Revolution, and ros
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Tennessee. services. force. occupation of Columbus. River-defenses. Polk's subsequent career. ynolds's recollections of General Johnston at Columbus. his plans. anecdotes. habits. As General Polk felt unwilling to leave his post at Columbus, just at this juncture, and as General Johnstonsantest moments of General Polk's life was at Columbus, where General Johnston, after inspecting his the pressing necessity for the occupation of Columbus, and on August 28th Pillow wrote to Polk urgi fortifying, when General Johnston arrived at Columbus. About this time, September 10th, Grant wrotand No.10 was to be fortified as a reserve to Columbus; New Madrid to be fortified, so as to preventiter his recollections of General Johnston at Columbus. Himself a gentleman of fine talents and culical interest. Soon after he arrived at Columbus, Kentucky, he did me the honor of inviting me to cle, and yet extremely quiet. When he reached Columbus, the discipline of the considerable forces as[8 more...]
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Jeff Thompson's irregular command. It has already been seen that this plan failed through want of cooperation. Both Generals Polk and Pillow felt the pressing necessity for the occupation of Columbus, and on August 28th Pillow wrote to Polk urging its immediate seizure. This had been Polk's own view for some time, but orders from the War Department had restrained him. It was only, therefore, when an hour's delay might have proved fatal, and when it was too late to prevent the seizure of Paducah by the Federals, that General Polk felt justified in exceeding his instructions, and thus disturbing the pretended neutrality of Kentucky. The Secretary of War and Governor Harris both remonstrated; but President Davis replied to his explanations, Necessity justifies your action. Polk was rapidly fortifying, when General Johnston arrived at Columbus. About this time, September 10th, Grant wrote to Fremont, proposing to attack Columbus, which, under the circumstances, seems to the writer
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