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Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 8
ll never be able to recover from this last most miserable fear pas, The action of the President is university approved, and the conduct of General Banks highly commended. Important rumor from Richmond. City Point,Va, June 27. --Refugees, who have been taken by our gunboats to-day, report that the rebel Generals Jackson, Price, and Beauregard are in Richmond, and will be assigned to important commands shortly. A rumor prevailed in the rebel camp yesterday to the effect that Jackson's forces had arrived and had turned McClellan's fight wing. M'Clellan's headquarters. The army correspondent of the Philadelphia Press thus describes the headquarters of the commander of the army of the Potomac: "In the corner of a field of five hundred acres surrounded on two sides by woodland, the tents are pitched. The camp is on a hill, a quarter of a railed from any road, and the whole covers a space of four acres. The ground plan of the camp is a parallelogram, with th
Monterey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
f age. --He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, in March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapellepec, he again attracted attention by his gallant and meritorious cois John, the son, entered the West Point Academy in 1838. He graduated in 1842, and was appointed to the army from the State of Illinois, entering the service as a Brevet 3d Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, the brevet bearing date from September . On the 23d of February, 1847, he was brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious conduct at the battle of Vista. On the 1st of July, 1862 he took the actual rank of Captain in the corps of Topog
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
too much exposed to be the depot of so much property as the Confederates would be able to destroy by a successful attack. A general removal from White House to West Point is not improbable, if it has not already taken place. It was holding out the highest inducements almost imaginable to the enemy, who, we may reasonably suppose Brigadier-General Silas Casey commanded the advance division at the battle of Fair Oaks. --General Casey was born in Rhode Island about the year 1806; entered West Point in 1822; graduated in 1826, and entered the Seventh infantry; was promoted to First Lieutenant in June, 1836, and Captain in July, 1839. In the Florida war Capthe other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in Massachusetts, about the year 1817, and is consequently about 45 years of age. --He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevett
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
ompose official dispatches to the War Department, Until he was heard from it may have been deemed inexpedient to make any publication of the disjointed facts in possession of the Government. Another and not so hopeful view of the case may be that after the telegraph agent left the ground to take his special message to Washington another battle may have taken place not so favorable to our arms, or which had not been concluded up to last evening. There is an unpleasant rumor, by way of City Point, that "Stonewall" Jackson turned the right of Gen. McClellan's line on Thursday last, but the authority for it is very bad, and then the Associated Press news must be later. We incline to the belief that a victory has been won, and that General McClellan is now in or near Richmond. In a few hours, however, we hope that the public may be relieved from its painful suspense. The Withheld news from Richmond.[from the New York times, June 30.] The public appetite, which was whette
Contreras (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 8
Brigadier-General Silas Casey commanded the advance division at the battle of Fair Oaks. --General Casey was born in Rhode Island about the year 1806; entered West Point in 1822; graduated in 1826, and entered the Seventh infantry; was promoted to First Lieutenant in June, 1836, and Captain in July, 1839. In the Florida war Captain Casey served with distinction under General Worth. He served also throughout the Mexican war, and added still further to his reputation for gallantry. At Contreras and Churubusco be distinguished himself, and received the braver of Major. At the assault on Chapuitepec he led the storming party, and was severely wounded. For this he received the brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. At the outbreak of the rebellion Colonel Casey was one of the first to offer his services to the Government, and obtained command of a brigade in August, 1861. On the reorganization of the army under Gen. McClellan he was appointed to the command of a division in Gen. Heintzelm
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 8
Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, in March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapellepec, he again attracted attention by his gallant and meritorious conduct, and was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel. At the close of the war with Mexico he withdrew from the service, and soon afterward emigrated to California. The outbreak of the rebellion found him there, and he was one of the first of the old West Pointers who offered his services to the Government. He was one of the first batch of Brigadier-Generals of volunteers appointed by President Lincoln on 17th May, 1861; and was, on his arrival, placed in command of a brigade of the army of the Potomac, and subsequently of a division. From July, 1861. to February, 1862. he was stationed in Southern Maryland, on the north shore of the Potomac, his
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 8
Pope. Major-Gen. John Pope is a man about forty years of age, and a native of Kentucky. He is a son of Governor Nathaniel Pope, of Virginia, who went to Kentucky before the birth of John, and, after living in Kentucky a few years removed to Illinois John, the son, entered the West Point Academy in 1838. He graduated in 1842, and was appointed to the army from the State of Illinois, entering the service as a Brevet 3d Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in several conflicts at MoState of Illinois, entering the service as a Brevet 3d Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, the brevet bearing date from September . On the 23d of February, 1847, he was brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious conduct at the battle of Vista. On the 1st of July, 1862 he took the actual rank of Captain in the corps of Topographical Engineers, and on the 17th of May, 1861, was made a Brigadier-General of volunteers. His brilliant movement in Central Mississippi tended as much as anything to restores place to that State, and his brilliant of New led to the evaluati
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 8
have no direct authority for saying that the White House will soon cease to be the point of the particular interest which it at present has, as the base of the army of the Potomac, yet I am left to infer as much from a variety of reasons. The breaking up of the hospitals there, by sending away the large number of patients in the vicinity, may not be proof in itself of su intention, though such fact, taken in connection with others, might go to strengthen such a supposition. To day the State of Maine arrived, with between 300 and 400 invalids, but few of them wounded, to be followed by 1,200 or 1,500 more. This may be simply a measure of reform, resulting from a new regime, while it may be that it may be something more. Prudent men, especially since the recent rains, have felt that the White House was a position too much exposed to be the depot of so much property as the Confederates would be able to destroy by a successful attack. A general removal from White House to West Po
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 8
e service, and soon afterward emigrated to California. The outbreak of the rebellion found him there, and he was one of the first of the old West Pointers who offered his services to the Government. He was one of the first batch of Brigadier-Generals of volunteers appointed by President Lincoln on 17th May, 1861; and was, on his arrival, placed in command of a brigade of the army of the Potomac, and subsequently of a division. From July, 1861. to February, 1862. he was stationed in Southern Maryland, on the north shore of the Potomac, his duty being to prevent the rebels crossing the river, and to amuse them with their river stockade while McClellan was getting his army into trim. This difficult duty he performed admirably. Maj. Gen. John Pope. Major-Gen. John Pope is a man about forty years of age, and a native of Kentucky. He is a son of Governor Nathaniel Pope, of Virginia, who went to Kentucky before the birth of John, and, after living in Kentucky a few years remove
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 8
e injustice to General Casey, which has since been repaired by an explanatory dispatch. General Casey's division, though weak, and much reddened by sickness, stood its ground splendidly, as its long record of killed and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Brigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the battle of Fair Oaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in Massachusetts, about the year 1817, and is consequently about 45 years of age. --He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, in March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapellep
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