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Washington (search for this): chapter 10
but few as well, and none better, qualified for the situation, and can truly say that no one desires his success more than myself. At the same time, I regret to learn that General Houston is unfriendly to General Johnston, as I am disposed to believe if he exercises his influence with Mr. Polk, he will prevent his succeeding, as most, if not all, of the appointments made or selected from Texas will be on the recommendation of General Houston. I have, this moment, received orders from Washington to take possession of the country to the Rio Grande, and establish myself on the left bank of that river, as soon as I could make the preparations necessary for doing so (which will occupy some three weeks, principally in collecting transportation, etc.); but not to cross the Rio Grande unless Mexico should make or declare war, in which case I would act on the offensive. Whether war will grow out of this movement, time must determine; but I, for one, hope that all difficulties between the
tily out of the redoubt to the stone building in the rear, and we pursued them so closely that I reached the gate as they were closing it, and, jumping against it, forced it open. The cry immediately went up of surrender, and the officer supposed to be in command advanced and delivered his sword. After the capture of the redoubt and the Fort Taneria, I followed the flying Mexicans with a large part of my regiment to attack the Fort el Diablo, and when near to it was ordered back by General Quitman, the brigade commander, and directed to join our division. It was behind a long wall, and under cross-fire of the artillery of the enemy's salients on our left. I approached General Johnston, and told him I had been recalled when about to take the salient on our left, that we were uselessly exposed where we were, and said, If not the left, then let the right salient be attacked. He answered, with his usual calm manner and quick perception, We cannot get any orders, but if you will m
Ohio Regiment. General Hooker's account of it. incident with General Hamer. complimented and recommended for Brigadier-General. overlookate attack; and, while we were making the needful dispositions, General Hamer, who had in the mean time succeeded to the command of the divisble event in war. During the passage through the cornfield, General Hamer moved on until he reached a point where the fence was too high flemen formed and advancing on the enemy. He told me he called General Hamer's attention to it. During the assault upon the city, General Johnston accompanied Hamer's brigade of Butler's division, remaining for the most part with Colonel Mitchell's First Ohio Regiment. He wasference, reaching high words, between General Johnston and Brigadier-General Hamer. This officer had been a member of Congress, and was appo be accounted his friend. General Johnston felt a deep regret when Hamer, shortly after, fell a victim to the climate. It was believed that
Jason Rogers (search for this): chapter 10
l, Brazos Santiago, Burita on the Rio Grande, Matamoras, and Reynosa, but we have no means of ascertaining the number-say 14,000. I visited the camp of the Louisville Legion on Brazos Island; they are a fine body of men; they are now at Burita. Rogers Lieutenant-Colonel Jason Rogers, of the Louisville Legion-General Johnston's brother-in-law. was quite well. Very truly, your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. Point Isabel, Texas, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancock: When I last wrote to you we knLieutenant-Colonel Jason Rogers, of the Louisville Legion-General Johnston's brother-in-law. was quite well. Very truly, your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. Point Isabel, Texas, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancock: When I last wrote to you we knew nothing of our destination. The discharge of all the Louisiana regiments created great uneasiness among the Texas regiments, lest they, being six months men, should also be discharged. It was, however, decided otherwise. I have received orders to march, and will be en route this evening with my regiment, a fine body of riflemen, capable, from the instruction received here, of manoeuvring with great rapidity and precision; and I do not doubt that they will acquire distinction. The command
Margaret Strother Hancook (search for this): chapter 10
thout seeing one; but after passing Corpus Christi they appeared in great numbers, fiercely rearing themselves up and offering battle to an approaching horse and rider. The Texans were gathering in hot haste at Point Isabel to defend their border, and their organization was rapidly effected. As General Johnston's extant letters give a clear and succinct account of the campaign and his connection with it, they may be allowed to tell their own story: Point Isabel, July 10, 1846. Dear Hancook: I suppose some time since you have stricken me from the roll of your friends, and, seemingly to yourself, with great justice; but things are not all that they seem. About the time I should have written to you I felt myself obliged, by the request of the Governor, who desired to give me rank next himself in the Texas quota of four regiments, to go by land to Corpus Christi. Once away from Galveston there was no opportunity of writing until I should reach this point, and since my arrival
Alexander McClung (search for this): chapter 10
moving rapidly in support, attacked the first battery or redoubt, a strong work armed with artillery and escopetas or muskets, and bravely carried the work (Alexander McClung, at the head of the Mississippians of his wing of the regiment, being the first to enter), driving the enemy from it with considerable loss. The Ohio regimeof the men in the redoubt. After firing a few minutes, it was perceptibly our best policy to storm the covering work, and I ordered my men to advance. Lieutenant-Colonel McClung had been the captain of the company raised in the Tombigbee Valley, and which was on the left of the centre. Tie sprang before it, and called out, Tombigbee boys, follow me! The whole regiment moved forward — that company most rapidly-and Lieutenant-Colonel McClung and Lieutenant Patterson first sprang upon the breastwork. The Mexicans ran hastily out of the redoubt to the stone building in the rear, and we pursued them so closely that I reached the gate as they were closing i
d I do not doubt that they will acquire distinction. The commanding general is concentrating upon Camargo as rapidly as possible with the very limited means of transportation at his disposition; and we suppose we will march immediately upon that point. The war should be conducted directly against the city of Mexico, the seat of vitality and strength. Apart from all science, a mere animal instinct would inculcate that. The desire of a speedy termination, as well as economy, points out Alvarado, or some place south of Vera Cruz (at the proper season), as the initial point of operation, retaining an army corps at Monterey, or on the route thence to Mexico. These movements would compel a concentration of the strength of Mexico at the capital, where a decisive engagement would soon be fought with adequate force and the war terminated. Mexico is to that republic what Paris is to France. If Mexico falls, her dependencies fall with her. Why, then, waste a cartridge on the castle of
est may follow you. I moved off across a small stream, and through a field to the front of the tete-de-pont, which covered the front of the Purissima Bridge, where I met Captain Field, of the United States Infantry, with his company, and Colonel Mansfield, of the United States Engineers. Under their advice, a plan was formed for immediate attack; and, while we were making the needful dispositions, General Hamer, who had in the mean time succeeded to the command of the division, General Butler having been wounded, came up with his command and ordered me to retire. Both Colonel Mansfield and I remonstrated with him, and endeavored to show him the importance of our position. He was not convinced, but persisted in his own view. My men were withdrawn from the several posts assigned to them; but before this could be done the division had gone a considerable distance. Captain Field withdrew with me, and was killed while crossing the open field, by fire from the main fort. This fiel
Bennett H. Henderson (search for this): chapter 10
sincere regards, I remain, yours truly, Z. Taylor. To Mr. George Hancock, Louisville, Ky. When General Taylor found that he would have to contend with a greatly superior force of Mexicans, he called for volunteers to sustain his movement. The Texan Legislature promptly passed a bill raising the quota of that State. It was proposed to confer upon the Governor, who was himself requested to take chief command, the appointment of field and staff officers; and, under this supposition, Governor Henderson wrote, May 8th, urging General Johnston to meet him at Point Isabel, and again, through their mutual friend, Thomas F. McKinney, assuring him that he should receive rank next to himself in the Texan contingent. A messenger from General Taylor had arrived in Galveston on the 28th of April, with a request to General Johnston to join him at once. As, unfortunately, no vessel could be obtained to proceed by sea, he started on horseback, with a squad of gallant young men, for the scene of
James Love (search for this): chapter 10
contingent. A messenger from General Taylor had arrived in Galveston on the 28th of April, with a request to General Johnston to join him at once. As, unfortunately, no vessel could be obtained to proceed by sea, he started on horseback, with a squad of gallant young men, for the scene of action. The time required for a land-journey brought him to Point Isabel too late for a share in the actions at Palo Alto and Resaca. His wife and infant son were left at Galveston under the care of Colonel Love and his good wife. Leonard Groce, for many years General Johnston's friend, knowing his military ardor, promptly sent him a fine war-horse, which bore him nobly through the campaign. On the road to Point Isabel, General Johnston saw the tarantula for the first time. He had been ten years in Texas, and much in the field, without seeing one; but after passing Corpus Christi they appeared in great numbers, fiercely rearing themselves up and offering battle to an approaching horse and r
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