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Albert T. Burnley (search for this): chapter 11
nded me in relation to your applying for office. I agree with you fully that a gentleman ought not to ask for one, but in your case this never was asked of you. The President of his own accord expressed the determination to give you one, if you would take it, and your friends only wanted to learn from you what you preferred. However, the thing is now settled. Joe Taylor is now here, and tells me you will shortly be offered the place of paymaster in the army. . ... G. Hancock. Mr. A. T. Burnley was in General Taylor's confidence, and had been selected by him as one of the proprietors of the Administration organ. He wrote to General Johnston, on the 21st of May: General Taylor intended to offer you the marshalship of Texas. I told him you would not have it. He said then, if Reynolds resigned, he intended to offer you the collectorship of Galveston. I told him you would not have it. Then, said he, I shall offer him a paymaster's place in the army. Not knowing your vie
William Preston Johnston (search for this): chapter 11
e crested Wood-Duck. the wounded eagle. General Johnston's ideas of the conduct of life; of educat many good soldiers from the service. General Johnston was not without sufficient influence to hl about them. As almost the only family that General and Mrs. Johnston saw in their years of plant vision and steadiness of purpose enabled General Johnston to govern his life by a few simple, gener a letter of May 16, 1849, to the writer, General Johnston says: My crops are small, but since at some length a number of extracts from General Johnston's letters, touching topics connected with the President, were especially zealous. General Johnston, however, looked at the matter in an unexof the Administration organ. He wrote to General Johnston, on the 21st of May: General Taylorhe plantation for military service again, General Johnston had the encouragement of his wife, who noe path of duty, and trod it manfully. General Johnston, in conversation with the writer, said, i[40 more...]
Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 11
st in the army, nor did I request any friend to do it; nor would I, after that, have accepted any offer. I have had the firmness to resist the most powerful impulse of Nature and education; and, no doubt, for the best, at least so far as my family is concerned. You will oblige me by presenting my most friendly regards to General Butler. His soldierly and gallant bearing commanded the admiration of every one, and I would be glad to know that he will lead an effective force to the aid of Scott; for, truly, the situation of our army is precarious. The force to have accomplished the work given to him, promptly and economically both with regard to blood and treasure, should not have been less than 50,000 men. With that amount of force he could have controlled the resources of the country for the support of his army, and saved all further expense to his own Government after his outfit. A force so small as his present one, and so isolated in the midst of any other people than Mexican
y now recalls the expression of the most vigorous thoughts connected with military operations, and I am convinced that he then possessed all the high powers of mind which he has lately displayed; that his capacity is no sudden endowment; that the great strategetic problems solved by him have often undergone the severest scrutiny of close investigation. These things are true of all minds which are accounted great on any subject. The vast conceptions of Hannibal, Caesar, Napoleon, Newton, Cicero, Homer, Angelo, Wren, Davy, etc., following the analogies of Nature, were embodiments which were developed by the active and toilsome labors of the mind. Hence the confidence, energy, and readiness, when the emergency arises. They are no sudden inspirations. We tread with rapidity and confidence the path we have often traveled over, all others with tardy doubtfulness. We hear nothing of the progress of the war. There is too much to be done with too little means. An acknowledged princ
d excellently well. The yield has been great; and the quality Mr. Kenner, I understand, says equal, if not superior, to Louisiana sugar made by the most improved means. Mr. Caldwell, fifteen miles from here, on the same kind of soil as mine (peach-land The wild-peach, a kind of laurel, grows on the low ridges and drier spots of the alluvion.), made 104 hogsheads (or thousands of pounds) of sugar, besides molasses, with sixteen hands, which is selling from eight to ten cents per pound. Sweeney has been quite as successful, and others that I have heard from. Your kind invitation and offers to us will be long gratefully remembered. It is at the dead point that aid is most valued and most seldom offered; and, therefore, when it is, it ought never to be forgotten. Writing to Mr. Hancock, October 21, 1847, General Johnston says: We have been blessed with excellent health since we came here, and everything has prospered with us better than we had any right to anticipate.
e climate, with which the apprehensions of our friends threatened us. If by any good fortune I can obtain the capital to cultivate my plantation in sugar-cane, I feel sure that I will accumulate wealth. Like the poor, imprisoned abbe of the Castle d'if, I am sure that, in the ownership of this beautiful estate, I possess a great treasure; but I fear I shall not be able to make it manifest to any capitalist. Fifteen years ago yesterday we fought the Sacs and Foxes, and defeated them at Bad Axe on the Upper Mississippi. Old Zach, as lieutenant-colonel, commanded the First Regiment there. His conduct on that occasion established in my mind an unshaken confidence in his great courage and loyal devotion to his country, as well as a high opinion of his good sense and excellent judgment; but no one imagined that in that honest and faithful brain there were, even latent, those great principles of strategy which the events of last year have so splendidly illustrated. My memory now rec
u have it, it will be felt and silently acknowledged; if exacted by words or bearing, it will be withheld. With the consciousness of having deserved well be content. If you deserve well, the merit of it will usually be accorded to you. But no one must try to find out what people think of actions he himself may approve. At the same time that the good opinion of those by whom we are surrounded is to be highly valued, those who fish for it usually catch minnows. Avoid in your speaking what Macaulay calls carmagnoles (puns, jests, rant, interjections), but few conditions of society admit their use. Your own good sense, my dear son, has already suggested to you better counsel than I can give you; but it is the privilege of age to make youth suffer in that way, and you perceive I use my privilege. Your affectionate father, A. Sidney Johnston. Brazoria County, Texas, December 11, 1848. my dear will: Your last letter, giving renewed assurance of the satisfactory progress and
of the most vigorous thoughts connected with military operations, and I am convinced that he then possessed all the high powers of mind which he has lately displayed; that his capacity is no sudden endowment; that the great strategetic problems solved by him have often undergone the severest scrutiny of close investigation. These things are true of all minds which are accounted great on any subject. The vast conceptions of Hannibal, Caesar, Napoleon, Newton, Cicero, Homer, Angelo, Wren, Davy, etc., following the analogies of Nature, were embodiments which were developed by the active and toilsome labors of the mind. Hence the confidence, energy, and readiness, when the emergency arises. They are no sudden inspirations. We tread with rapidity and confidence the path we have often traveled over, all others with tardy doubtfulness. We hear nothing of the progress of the war. There is too much to be done with too little means. An acknowledged principle of war is that, when th
Santa Anna (search for this): chapter 11
orce of Mexicans, to whom he must surrender. Hie said to me: They don't know Rogers, if they think he will surrender. He will hold the citadel to the last man, and then blow it up, before he will surrender. But I am glad he is there. He will beat the Mexicans, and has now a chance to win renown. Unfortunately, the Mexicans did not make the attempt. When the battle of Buena Vista was impending, it was said that Old Zach had made a mistake in his movements, and would be destroyed by Santa Anna. General Johnston reviewed the campaign, explaining the reasons that made General Taylor's strategy the best under the circumstances, and confidently predicted his success. He had faith in Taylor's military capacity and soldierly qualities. Though cut off from a participation in the exciting events of the Mexican War, General Johnston took a lively interest in the operations of the American army. His correspondence shows a full appreciation of the valor and skill of our officers and
the place or kept it; and I have no doubt that what I have already done would make the place sell for two thousand dollars more. You would be surprised, I think, at what I have achieved in three months with my limited means. If a good opportunity to sell occurs, I will not let it pass .... The successful cultivation of the cane here is no longer a problem. Everywhere it has been tried in this neighborhood it has succeeded excellently well. The yield has been great; and the quality Mr. Kenner, I understand, says equal, if not superior, to Louisiana sugar made by the most improved means. Mr. Caldwell, fifteen miles from here, on the same kind of soil as mine (peach-land The wild-peach, a kind of laurel, grows on the low ridges and drier spots of the alluvion.), made 104 hogsheads (or thousands of pounds) of sugar, besides molasses, with sixteen hands, which is selling from eight to ten cents per pound. Sweeney has been quite as successful, and others that I have heard from.
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