hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
A. S. Johnston 1,542 0 Browse Search
Albert Sidney Johnston 865 67 Browse Search
Texas (Texas, United States) 578 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 515 3 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 458 0 Browse Search
William Preston Johnston 445 3 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 436 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 404 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 347 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 341 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

Found 671 total hits in 105 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
e the Southern sympathizers. An inspection of the map will reveal how powerful this influence was, and what an element of weakness it became to the Confederacy on General Johnston's line. the Alleghany Mountains and their Western side-ranges form a huge quadrangle, extending from Pennsylvania southwestwardly into Georgia and Alabama, and embracing Western Virginia, East Tennessee, and Eastern Kentucky. Its population, the overflow by emigration of the poorer classes of Virginia and North Carolina, was rude, hardy, and ignorant. A sort of clanship, based on association and kinship, prevailed among this primitive people, who followed with blind confidence local leaders, eminent for wealth or popular arts. Hence they usually voted and acted in masses. It is sufficient to say that the United States Government, more clearly than the Confederate, appreciated the character and importance of these mountaineers, and secured the adhesion of their leaders to the Federal side. The conseq
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
o Federal history as a discomfiture that prevented the capture of Louisville, and arrested a whole plan of campaign. Buckner's movement pr His scouts burned the bridge over Salt River, thirty miles from Louisville, in which city the wildest rumors were afloat and his vanguard wa thence dispatched General Buckner with a division forward toward Louisville. Van Horne, speaking of Buckner, says, He advanced to capture Louisville. The Comte de Paris tells us his purpose was- To traverse the whole State of Kentucky by rail, so as to reach Louisville wLouisville with a sufficient number of troops to take possession of that city, and to hoist the Confederate flag on the banks of the Ohio. .... It failed he drum, Rousseau's brigade, 1,200 strong, 1,800 home Guards from Louisville, and several companies led by Lieutenant-Colonel R. W. Johnson, uense until an army could be created. it has been alleged that Louisville might have been captured by a bold stroke. This is possibly true
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ary situation in Kentucky. General Johnston's arrival in Nashville. personal reminiscences, the defense of Tennessee. General Johnwill be detailed as they arise. General Johnston proceeded to Nashville, stopping in Knoxville only long enough to confer with General Feerland Gap. On the 14th of September General Johnston reached Nashville. He had been looked for with the greatest anxiety by both the peulated the effects of his policy. General Johnston arrived in Nashville September 14th, and on the same day determined to seize Bowling Gident, the day before it was made, in the following letter: Nashville, Tennessee, September 16, 1861. Mr. President: Your dispatch of the out 3,000 of whom were Tennessee troops from Camp Trousdale, near Nashville, and the remainder Kentuckians, composed of the Second Kentucky R The desirableness of this movement was enhanced by the fact that Nashville had recently been made a base of supplies for the Confederate arm
Richmond, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
-length the troops designed for the invasion of Tennessee. General Johnston, therefore, determined, while in reality only acting on the defensive, to obtain as many as possible of the advantages of an aggressive movement. The result proved that he had not miscalculated the effects of his policy. General Johnston arrived in Nashville September 14th, and on the same day determined to seize Bowling Green. He placed General S. B. Buckner in charge of the column of advance, telegraphing to Richmond for his appointment as brigadier-general, which was made next day, September 15th. The grounds of his intended movement were given by General Johnston to the President, the day before it was made, in the following letter: Nashville, Tennessee, September 16, 1861. Mr. President: Your dispatch of the 13th instant was received at Chattanooga. After full conference with Governor Harris, and after learning the facts, political and military, I am satisfied that the political bearing of t
Licking, Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
he Alleghanies, flow first southwest, and thence by sharp bends to the North, traversing respectively the northern and Southern portions of Tennessee, and finally emptying close together into the Ohio near its mouth. The history of the attempt to defend these Rivers by forts at Donelson and Henry will be given in detail hereafter. General Grant had possession of Smithland and Paducah, at their mouths. Indeed, the outlets and navigable waters of all the Rivers of Kentucky, the Sandy, Licking, Kentucky, and Green, were in the hands of the Federals, and gave them the great military advantage of easy communication with their base by water-ways. Green and Barren Rivers, locked and dammed, cut the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, so as to render any point in advance of Bowling Green unsafe; while Bowling Green itself, situated on the turnpike, Railroad, and River, was a good position for defense. Thus, as Columbus and the Cumberland Mountains had become the extremities of the Confedera
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
f the conflict. But the centre, the line of Tennessee from Cumberland Gap to the Mississippi Riverngth the troops designed for the invasion of Tennessee. General Johnston, therefore, determined, whhad some 4,000 men, about 3,000 of whom were Tennessee troops from Camp Trousdale, near Nashville, more Tennesseeans were already in camp in Middle Tennessee, but not half of them were armed, and the there were also some unarmed Kentuckians in Tennessee. On taking possession of Bowling Green, d Alabama, and embracing Western Virginia, East Tennessee, and Eastern Kentucky. Its population, thn's line, and a barrier to the invasion of East Tennessee. the water-lines of the West were a sotively the northern and Southern portions of Tennessee, and finally emptying close together into thd at camp Dick Robinson four Kentucky, two East Tennessee, and several regiments from Ohio and India, the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, and East Tennessee. These four approaches were covered, as f[9 more...]
Simon B. Buckner (search for this): chapter 21
nd theory. letter to President Davis. the Confederate line. Zollicoffer and Buckner. Buckner seizes Bowling Green. Federal alarm. Confederate advance. GeneralBuckner seizes Bowling Green. Federal alarm. Confederate advance. General Johnston's proclamation. considerations determining the line. the theatre of War. strength of armies. Johnston conceals his weakness, his memoranda. Federal pl14th, and on the same day determined to seize Bowling Green. He placed General S. B. Buckner in charge of the column of advance, telegraphing to Richmond for his apmovement on Bowling Green, I have been compelled to select and appoint General Simon B. Buckner a brigadier-general, subject to your approval, which I hope it may meeston, General C. S. A. His Excellency Jefferson Davis. A few days prior to Buckner's movement, General Felix K. Zollicoffer, in accordance with arrangements prevhs for local defense. The movement upon Bowling Green was committed to General S. B. Buckner, as already stated. Buckner, after his resignation, and after some
as the rebels were fully prepared. General Sidney Johnston immediately crossed into Kentucky, and advanced as far as Bowling Green, which he began to fortify, and thence dispatched General Buckner with a division forward toward Louisville. Van Horne, speaking of Buckner, says, He advanced to capture Louisville. The Comte de Paris tells us his purpose was- To traverse the whole State of Kentucky by rail, so as to reach Louisville with a sufficient number of troops to take possessionurrection. Already two regiments of East Tennesseeans had found their way to camp Dick Robinson; and, at that time, the presence of a United States army would have roused a numerous and warlike population in revolt against the Confederacy. Van Horne says ( army of the Cumberland, vol. I., page 37): General Thomas suggested to General Anderson the importance of concentrating for an advance to Knoxville, Tennessee, to seize the East Tennessee & Virginia Railroad, destroy all the bridg
Comte Paris (search for this): chapter 21
ure one week before. General Sherman says (vol. i., page 197): This was universally known to be the signal for action. For it we were utterly unprepared, whereas the rebels were fully prepared. General Sidney Johnston immediately crossed into Kentucky, and advanced as far as Bowling Green, which he began to fortify, and thence dispatched General Buckner with a division forward toward Louisville. Van Horne, speaking of Buckner, says, He advanced to capture Louisville. The Comte de Paris tells us his purpose was- To traverse the whole State of Kentucky by rail, so as to reach Louisville with a sufficient number of troops to take possession of that city, and to hoist the Confederate flag on the banks of the Ohio. .... It failed of success. ... Learning that his movements were known, and that the enemy was on the watch for him, Buckner, who had already reached the suburbs of Elizabethtown, not far from the Ohio, halted, and fell back upon Bowling Green. When it i
W. W. Mackall (search for this): chapter 21
mp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Enginee. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant-General. The appointments of volunteer aides were made chiefly to secure intelligent advice on the political affairs of the department, each State of which was represented on the staff.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...