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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Cordoba (Spain) (search for this): chapter 8
ributed to the prairie Indians, they were committed on the edge of the Cherokee district, and pointed suspicion to that tribe. Every day or two, during the year 1837, some murdered citizen or stolen property attested their hostile feeling. Ibid., vol. II,, p. 228, The Mexican emissaries promised the Indians arms, ammunition, and the plunder and prisoners-women and children included-taken during the war; also the peaceable possession of the country then held by them. In August, 1838, Cordova's rebellion occurred. In this abortive insurrection the Mexicans about Nacogdoches disclaimed their allegiance to Texas, and collected a force reported 600 strong, three-fourths of whom were Indians; but on the approach of the Texan volunteers under Rusk they retreated to the Cherokee country, and thence, when pressed by him, to the Upper Trinity, whence they dispersed. The Indians continued their hostilities, and later in the season, October 16th, General Rusk had a sharp combat with the
Dallas County (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
their improvements, crops, and all such property as they left through necessity or choice. This single measure, says Dr. Starr, relieved the frontier of the entire east, carried forward the settlements at least one hundred miles, and gave to our citizens permanent occupancy of a region not surpassed in fertility and all the elements for successful agriculture by any portion of the State. The counties of Rusk, Cherokee, Anderson, Smith, Henderson, Van Zandt, Wood, Upshur, Hunt, Kaufman, Dallas, and others, were subsequently formed from territory which could not be safely peopled by whites till these treacherous Indians were expelled. The counties named above contained in 1870 a population of 116,370, with property assessed at $15,857,191. The faults charged against the white race in its dealings with inferior races must, in this case, be laid at the door of the United States, if anywhere, and not of Texas. The savages were subject to the United States, which, contrary to natural
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Jacinto, and yet no government, except the United States, had acknowledged the independence of Texaowers, eventually led to annexation to the United States. The two subjects most pressing, however,d Fields, a half-breed, emigrated from the United States to Texas in 1822. They easily extorted a d broken away from the great tribes in the United States. Now, however, under the aggressive polic and prevent. hostilities by the emigrant United States Indians. A hearty sympathizer with Texas, warriors, and force them to return to the United States. Nevertheless, in spite of the rejectimptly returned from whence they came --the United States-having been fairly paid a full and just co, in this case, be laid at the door of the United States, if anywhere, and not of Texas. The savages were subject to the United States, which, contrary to natural right and treaty stipulations, peruments A and B. Texas communicated to the United States her intention to protect herself from the [8 more...]
Wood County (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
full and just compensation for their improvements, crops, and all such property as they left through necessity or choice. This single measure, says Dr. Starr, relieved the frontier of the entire east, carried forward the settlements at least one hundred miles, and gave to our citizens permanent occupancy of a region not surpassed in fertility and all the elements for successful agriculture by any portion of the State. The counties of Rusk, Cherokee, Anderson, Smith, Henderson, Van Zandt, Wood, Upshur, Hunt, Kaufman, Dallas, and others, were subsequently formed from territory which could not be safely peopled by whites till these treacherous Indians were expelled. The counties named above contained in 1870 a population of 116,370, with property assessed at $15,857,191. The faults charged against the white race in its dealings with inferior races must, in this case, be laid at the door of the United States, if anywhere, and not of Texas. The savages were subject to the United Stat
Vera Cruz (Veracruz, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 8
he best justification of its foreign policy. This energetic line of action was stigmatized as a war policy; but it was, in fact, the only true peace policy, since it transferred the theatre of war to the enemy's territory, gave to foreign countries an assurance of strength, and by an exhibition of internal security, unknown before, invited capital and population. Moreover, Texas showed an earnest desire for peace, seeking the mediation of friendly nations, and sending Mr. Bee as envoy to Vera Cruz to try to open negotiations. Though spurned by Mexico, these overtures, seconded by warlike preparations, helped to gain the respect of civilized peoples. The conduct of military affairs was intrusted by the President to the Secretary of War, whose wish was to raise a small regular force, which, thoroughly armed, drilled, and disciplined, would serve, as the nucleus and example for a volunteer army. General Johnston's views to this effect were laid before the President in the followi
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
act the Texan Government had undoubted evidence. Ibid., vol. II,, p. 251, This secret league against the Texans seems to have existed at least as early as 1835, and to have continued unbroken, The United States Government received information from Colonel Mason, at Fort Leavenworth, in July, 1838, confirmed by General Gaines, that the Cherokees were arranging for a council of all the tribes on the frontier, preparatory to striking a simultaneous blow upon the settlements of Arkansas and Missouri, from Red River to the Upper Mississippi, instigated and organized by the agents of Mexico. One of these emissaries, Don Pedro Julian Miracle, was killed near the Cross Timbers, in Texas; and his journal also confirmed the suspicions of the conspiracy against Texas at least. The Cherokees and Caddoes visited Matamoras in June, and obtained large quantities of ammunition from the authorities there. Report of the Secretary of State (Texas), November, 1839, p. 22. On November 26, 183
Niles (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
event the execution of a contract for the introduction of 24,000 Creeks into Texas. On the same day, the Committee of Vigilance for Nacogdoches also wrote to President Jackson, giving the details of the aforesaid contract, pointing to its violation of the treaty of 1831, and soliciting the interference of the United States Government; praying that a sparse and defenseless population be protected from the evils that were so tragically manifested on the frontiers of Georgia and Alabama. Niles's Register, vol. XLIX., p. 16Q. This letter was signed by Sam Houston and five others. Mr. Castello, Mexican charge d'affaires, offered the same remonstrance, October 14, 1835. President Jackson took the steps necessary to prevent the threatened irruption. In the beginning of the Texan Revolution, the Consultation, a provisional government, representing the municipalities, met November 3, 1835. On November 13th, on the motion of Sam Houston, it made a solemn declaration to the Indians
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
situation there were objections not to be disregarded, except by men mindful not of themselves but of posterity only. It was an outpost, within the range of the fierce Comanches, 35 miles beyond Bastrop, the extreme settlement in that direction. Houston was 200 miles to the east; San Antonio, 80 miles southwest; the Gulf, 150 miles distant, with only two intervening stations; and Red River, the only inhabited frontier, 400 miles away. General Johnston wrote, May 9, 1839, to a friend in Kentucky, The agent has gone forth with his workmen armed, under the protection of a company of riflemen, to begin the new city of Austin. The commissioners, truly representing the spirit of the people, put aside all considerations of personal discomfort, privation and social isolation, the actual distribution of population, and the danger of Indian and Mexican enemies upon a long and exposed frontier, and looked only to what an accomplished destiny would require as the proper conditions of the cap
Upshur (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
d just compensation for their improvements, crops, and all such property as they left through necessity or choice. This single measure, says Dr. Starr, relieved the frontier of the entire east, carried forward the settlements at least one hundred miles, and gave to our citizens permanent occupancy of a region not surpassed in fertility and all the elements for successful agriculture by any portion of the State. The counties of Rusk, Cherokee, Anderson, Smith, Henderson, Van Zandt, Wood, Upshur, Hunt, Kaufman, Dallas, and others, were subsequently formed from territory which could not be safely peopled by whites till these treacherous Indians were expelled. The counties named above contained in 1870 a population of 116,370, with property assessed at $15,857,191. The faults charged against the white race in its dealings with inferior races must, in this case, be laid at the door of the United States, if anywhere, and not of Texas. The savages were subject to the United States, whi
Nacogdoches, Tex. (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
orted a permission to settle from the Mexicans of Nacogdoches, who had been dispersed and cowed by the recent iDeclaration of Grievances, by the Ayuntamiento of Nacogdoches, the colonists complained that Colonel Piedras ha On the same day, the Committee of Vigilance for Nacogdoches also wrote to President Jackson, giving the detaiwith their interests. Ho then located himself at Nacogdoches, near the Texas branch of the Cherokees, and alwaassurances of the committees of San Augustine and Nacogdoches, September 18, 1835, that their just and legal riants, with a well-appointed column, was moving on Nacogdoches under orders to kill or drive out the colonists. scertain the facts, the Committee of Vigilance at Nacogdoches dispatched agents to the Indians. C. H. Sims and In this abortive insurrection the Mexicans about Nacogdoches disclaimed their allegiance to Texas, and collectby, Sabine, and San Augustine. The regiment from Nacogdoches, which was under the command of General Rusk, had
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