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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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n Antonio. treaty. San Antonio massacre. its dramatic and deadly features. Comanche War. defeat of the Indians. The outlook of Texas seemed anything but bright at the beginning of Lamar's administration. Fortune, which at first appeared to smile upon the rising republic, finding her favors neglected, had now begun to turn away her face. Nearly three years had passed since San Jacinto, and yet no government, except the United States, had acknowledged the independence of Texas. The European powers refused recognition, and pointed to the claim of title maintained by Mexico, with an annual invasion that disputed possession of the soil and pretended to imperil the national existence. The navy, created by the Texan Congress in 1836, had disappeared in 1837: of its four vessels, two had gone down at sea, one had been sold, and one captured. The army had been disbanded, and Mexican machinations had been allowed to mature, drawing the wild tribes and the Cherokees into an alliance w
Bexar (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
. Fields and Hunter made a treaty with the Fredonian insurgents, in the winter of 1826; but a rival faction of the Cherokees murdered Hunter, and, led by Bowles, aided in putting down the revolt. Bowles became the war-chief of the Cherokees, and the leading spirit of the Texas Indians. The first concession by the Government to the Cherokees was an order, made August 15, 1831, to the local authorities, to offer them an establishment on a fixed tract of land, which the Political Chief at Bexar afterward reported that they had selected. When it is borne in mind that the chief motive of Mexico, in the colonization of Texas, had been to oppose the organization and valor of white men as a barrier between the restless and predatory Indians and interior Mexico, it seems a curious coincidence that the Government should begin to accord rights and privileges to savages, just when it was denying them to white men. The usurping Central Administration of Bustamante had, on April 6, 1830, ab
San Antonio (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
f the settlers. a band of Comanches visits San Antonio. treaty. San Antonio massacre. its dramaSan Antonio massacre. its dramatic and deadly features. Comanche War. defeat of the Indians. The outlook of Texas seemed anytaty and the appearance of Santa Anna before San Antonio; and this ill-omened, futile, and wasteful ection. Houston was 200 miles to the east; San Antonio, 80 miles southwest; the Gulf, 150 miles diterward they killed a party of six men near San Antonio. Louis P. Cooke, one of the commissionen the autumn of 1839 some Comanches came to San Antonio and informed Colonel Karnes that all the baoners, and that they must not come again to San Antonio without them. Colonel Fisher, who succeedearrative herein given of the occurrences at San Antonio is somewhat different from, and more detailand thirty-three women and children entered San Antonio. Major Howard arrived at the same time, rat them that he had forbidden them to come to San Antonio without their prisoners, thirteen of whom t
San Augustine (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
t, because their rights were prescriptive, they were treated with indulgence and allowed to retain their foothold when the immigrant Indians were expelled. Of the Cherokees, Shawnees, Kickapoos, etc., recent intruders, it is said they were restless and discontented, and in 1836 they gave unmistakable signs of hostility to the colonists by acts of depredation and murder. Texas Almanac, 1858, p. 174. Yoakum says that the Indians were kept quiet by the assurances of the committees of San Augustine and Nacogdoches, September 18, 1835, that their just and legal rights would be respected, and that no white man should interrupt them on their lands. Yoakum, History of Texas, vol. i., p. 858. Yet a different inference might be drawn from one of his anecdotes. He says that (in October or November, 1835) the appearance of Breese's company at Nacogdocheb had a fine effect on the Cherokee Indians, a large number of whom were then in town. Their fine uniform caps and coats attracted th
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
it. General Houston tried once and again to secure the constitutional approval to his action; but even his great personal popularity and political power failed in this. It is not improbable that his peculiar relations to the Cherokees had something to do with the rejection of the treaty by the Senate. A friendly biographer says that he passed the moulding period of his life, between fourteen and eighteen, with the Cherokees. When he abandoned his family, his home, his high office, in Tennessee, and the habits of civilized life, in 1829, it was to seek a refuge in this tribe, which adopted him into full citizenship. He lived with them, as an Indian, three years, and is supposed to have entered Texas on some mission connected with their interests. Ho then located himself at Nacogdoches, near the Texas branch of the Cherokees, and always showed for them an interest and affection which, if it clouded his judgment, was at least creditable to his heart. When this treaty was made
Hunt County (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
compensation for their improvements, crops, and all such property as they left through necessity or choice. This single measure, says Dr. Starr, relieved the frontier of the entire east, carried forward the settlements at least one hundred miles, and gave to our citizens permanent occupancy of a region not surpassed in fertility and all the elements for successful agriculture by any portion of the State. The counties of Rusk, Cherokee, Anderson, Smith, Henderson, Van Zandt, Wood, Upshur, Hunt, Kaufman, Dallas, and others, were subsequently formed from territory which could not be safely peopled by whites till these treacherous Indians were expelled. The counties named above contained in 1870 a population of 116,370, with property assessed at $15,857,191. The faults charged against the white race in its dealings with inferior races must, in this case, be laid at the door of the United States, if anywhere, and not of Texas. The savages were subject to the United States, which, con
Sabine (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
had been called for in the eastern counties to act with him. Some greater delay took place before the troops under the command of Colonel Burleson took the route for the Cherokee district than was anticipated by him, which it is scarcely necessary to mention, as no embarrassment was occasioned by it in the subsequent operations. He was not able, however, to cross the Neches until about the 14th of July; about which time the regiment of Landrum arrived from the counties of Harrison, Shelby, Sabine, and San Augustine. The regiment from Nacogdoches, which was under the command of General Rusk, had arrived some days before and taken a position near the camp of the Cherokees. The promptitude with which these movements were executed at that season of the year (early in July), and the spirit manifested on all occasions by the troops, claim the greatest praise. On the arrival of the regiments of Burleson and Landrum, the whole force was placed under the orders of Brigadier-General Douglas
Comanche (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
e intercepted at Plum Creek by other militia, under Felix Huston and Burleson, and routed with heavy loss. In the raid they lost about eighty warriors and most of their booty. In October severe retaliation was meted out to the Comanches by Colonel Moore, with a force of ninety Texans and twelve Lipans. He fell upon their village on the Red Fork of the Colorado, 300 miles above Austin, and killed 130 Indians and captured thirty-four, together with about 500 horses. This was the end of Comanche incursions for a long time. Finding war with the Texans so unprofitable, they turned their arms against their late allies of Mexico, and thus became to all intents the unpaid auxiliaries of Texas. Judge Love, writing June 4, 1840, says, The situation of the frontier proves the correctness of the Indian policy. This was the general sentiment, which was strengthened by the Plum Creek victory and Moore's reprisal. Though all the combats with the Comanches herein narrated took place after Ge
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ent will prevent the execution of a contract for the introduction of 24,000 Creeks into Texas. On the same day, the Committee of Vigilance for Nacogdoches also wrote to President Jackson, giving the details of the aforesaid contract, pointing to its violation of the treaty of 1831, and soliciting the interference of the United States Government; praying that a sparse and defenseless population be protected from the evils that were so tragically manifested on the frontiers of Georgia and Alabama. Niles's Register, vol. XLIX., p. 16Q. This letter was signed by Sam Houston and five others. Mr. Castello, Mexican charge d'affaires, offered the same remonstrance, October 14, 1835. President Jackson took the steps necessary to prevent the threatened irruption. In the beginning of the Texan Revolution, the Consultation, a provisional government, representing the municipalities, met November 3, 1835. On November 13th, on the motion of Sam Houston, it made a solemn declaration to
Anahuac (Chihuahua, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 8
it for despotism to ally itself with barbarism, and to seek to depress its intelligent opponents by the aid of an inferior race. That the order to Piedras was obeyed, either technically or substantially, is not probable, as the Indians would not have been satisfied with an allotment of lands in severalty in lieu of the range of country which they hunted over. It served the purpose intended, however; and 50 or 100 Shawnees and Cherokees followed Piedras, the next June, to aid Bradburn, at Anahuac, against Austin's colonists. In the Declaration of Grievances, by the Ayuntamiento of Nacogdoches, the colonists complained that Colonel Piedras had called in and employed Indians, in his meditated warfare on their rights ; and had insulted them by saying that he held Americans and Indians in the same estimation, and as standing on the same footing. Texas Almanac, 1869, p. 39. The Colonization Act of March 24, 1825, admitted Indians as settlers, when any of them, after having first
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