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rebel force gone to meet the Federal supply train movements of the Confederate armies in the east as reported by rebel pickets Vicksburg closely invested by General Grant Federal troops in southwest Missouri Federal supply train detained by high water at Neosho River Federal supplies running short at Fort Gibson high water ir defeat would encourage the faint hearted, and those in the North who have all along opposed the war, to cry for peace at almost any price. Our forces, under General Grant, are still besieging Vicksburg,. and our lines are tightening around the enemy there. We may expect to hear of some definite action at that place shortly, as pe of being provisioned again, as they are surrounded from all sides, and therefore completely isolated from other divisions of the rebel army. It seems that General Grant has not relaxed his grasp in the slightest degree since he commenced the siege. He has perhaps nearly a hundred thousand men, and has already made several fur
shall have been better informed of the operations of the two, opposing forces on the river north of us. The train and escort arrived at Fort Gibson, July 5th, just before twelve o'clock, although .we heard, early in the morning, that they would get in during the day. I made a good many inquiries concerning the cause of delay since they crossed the Neosho River at Hudson's ford. But we may now go back of the Neosho River to Fort Scott, and trace the progress of the train to Fort Blunt or Gibson. The train left Fort Scott with the following troops as an escort: One company of the Third Wisconsin cavalry, company C Ninth Kansas cavalry; six companies of the Second Colorado infantry; one section of Blair's battery, and one twelve-pound mountain howitzer. This force and the train reached Baxter Springs, on the 26th of June, where they were joined by Major Foreman of this division, with the six hundred men and one twelve-pound howitzer, which I have already mentioned as having left he
and River Indian women report heavy firing in the vicinity of Cabin Creek General Cabell on the east side of Grand River, near Cabin Creek, with artillery the suspl rout of the enemy how the Federal troops crossed Cabin Creek under fire General Cabell unable to join General Cooper's division on account of high water arrival s being encamped at Cincinnati, on the Arkansas line, under command of Brigadier-General Cabell. If the enemy arrive on the ground at the place they have chosen to mening that the train and escort arrived on the heights of Cabin Creek, that General Cabell, with fifteen hundred cavalry and four pieces of artillery, had arrived at oin General Cooper's divisions on account of high water. It is likely that General Cabell was to have had command of the entire rebel force, as there was no General enemy could have detained our troops and train at Cabin Creek another day, General Cabell would probably have been able to cross Grand River with his force, and to h
y, were to take the advance. This force was to be followed by Captain Stewart, with one company of the Ninth Kansas cavalry, one company of moments after Major Foreman was wounded and taken to the rear, Captain Stewart of the Ninth Kansas cavalry marched to the front with his comprd. The troops formed in line, the bugle sounded forward, and Captain Stewart led the cavalry, and Colonel Williams the colored infantry, wi yards of the enemy, when he turned and fled in great disorder Captain Stewart, who had led the cavalry in the charge at another point, dashef the swords of his men. The route of the enemy was complete. Captain Stewart, with all the cavalry pursued them for five miles south, cuttihave captured or destroyed the entire force of the enemy; and Captain Stewart thinks that had it not been inadvisable to leave the train too were four enlisted men killed, ten wounded and eight missing. Captain Stewart's company C, Ninth Kansas cavalry, had one man killed, three w
Chickasaw Indians (search for this): chapter 17
days yet. Fresh beef without salt would likely undermine the health of our troops in a short time. A considerable quantity of wheat has been obtained recently, which under a stress can be cooked and used for food. But the soldiers, whites and Indians, appear very cheerfully; and we do not apprehend that we shall be obliged to kill the dogs, and mules and horses here, before our provisions reach us. The shortness of rations and the isolation of our position sometimes causes the soldier to jocble zeal, too, in keeping him advised of the movements of the enemy. And from my own observations since I have been with this command, I believe it would have been impossible for any other officer to have won such affectionate regard from these Indians. To-day (July 3rd) was very quiet along the Arkansas; the enemy's pickets were in suspense as well as our troops at this post. They do not even seem to have heard of the artillery and musketry firing of Wednesday evening. Or if they have, t
Tom Livingston (search for this): chapter 17
l pickets shouted across the river on the 24th instant, that our commissary train was on the way down, and that Colonel Dodd was commanding the escort to it, which is composed of two infantry regiments and four pieces of artillery. This is really news to our officers here, as we have not heard what troops and how strong a force would guard it down. Our hostile neighbors across the river seem to be better informed of the movements of our train and troops in the country above than we are. Livingston, the guerrilla chieftain, whom I have frequently mentioned as operating in the vicinity of Baxter Springs, it is thought sends couriers to General Cooper every three or four days, and that they must either travel at night or take a route not much frequented by our troops. If Colonel Phillips would have carefully posted at half a dozen points twenty-five or thirty miles above here, say three men at each station, well armed and mounted on good horses, I believe that the enemy's dispatch bea
s crossed Cabin Creek under fire General Cabell unable to join General Cooper's division on account of high water arrival of supply train atthe vicinity of Baxter Springs, it is thought sends couriers to General Cooper every three or four days, and that they must either travel at nts intimate that this force has marched out to join the cavalry General Cooper sent out a few days ago to attack our train. That their pickete states that just before he left the enemy on the 28th ultimo, General Cooper had sent out another division of cavalry to join the force thatnding officer of the expedition has sent any dispatches back to General Cooper at Elk Creek, it is not likely that they show anything definitef Grand River, the day before, and was unable to cross and join General Cooper's divisions on account of high water. It is likely that Generare the rebel troops with whom we had to contend. We heard that General Cooper's assistant adjutant general, did mole than any other officers
James M. Williams (search for this): chapter 17
ttery, and one twelve-pound mountain howitzer. This force and the train reached Baxter Springs, on the 26th of June, where they were joined by Major Foreman of this division, with the six hundred men and one twelve-pound howitzer, which I have already mentioned as having left here on the 20th ultimo. This force and train moved fifteen miles south of Baxter to Hudson's Ford on Neosho River, where they were detained two days on account of high waters. While they were thus detained, Colonel J. M. Williams, commanding the colored regiment at Baxter Springs, received information which led him to believe that the escort and train would certainly be attacked on the way down, and perhaps within a day or two after they crossed the Neosho River, by a large force of the enemy. He, therefore, determined to march his colored regiment to Neosho River, and offer its services to Lieut. Colonel Theo. R. Dodd, Second Colorado infantry, commanding the escort. Colonel Dodd accepted this reinforceme
at each station, well armed and mounted on good horses, I believe that the enemy's dispatch bearers could be captured. A large part of the remaining force of the enemy on the south side of the Arkansas made a movement in some direction on the 25th. Their pickets intimate that this force has marched out to join the cavalry General Cooper sent out a few days ago to attack our train. That their pickets should venture to refer to the movements of this force in connection with our train looks are perfectly advised of all their movements. It is now reported by our scouts that most of the enemy's camp has been removed back to Elk Creek, some twenty miles south of this post. This explains the activity noticed in their camp on the 25th instant. Should we endeavor to cross the river and compel the flight of the detachments guarding the different fords, they would endeavor to warn their baggage trains at Elk Creek by signals, so that they could be moving south, several hours before
the suspense a National salute fired in honor of Independence day beef and beans for barbecue the pinch of hunger horses and dead rebels floating in the River two days fighting at Cabin Creek gallant charge of the colored regiment total rout of the enemy how the Federal troops crossed Cabin Creek under fire General Cabell unable to join General Cooper's division on account of high water arrival of supply train at Fort Gibson. The rebel pickets shouted across the river on the 24th instant, that our commissary train was on the way down, and that Colonel Dodd was commanding the escort to it, which is composed of two infantry regiments and four pieces of artillery. This is really news to our officers here, as we have not heard what troops and how strong a force would guard it down. Our hostile neighbors across the river seem to be better informed of the movements of our train and troops in the country above than we are. Livingston, the guerrilla chieftain, whom I have freq
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