hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 580 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 564 12 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 485 5 Browse Search
George G. Meade 378 0 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 319 1 Browse Search
Grant Ulysses Grant 308 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 288 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 268 2 Browse Search
Ewell 268 46 Browse Search
Billy Sherman 266 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). Search the whole document.

Found 1,298 total hits in 190 results.

... 14 15 16 17 18 19
July 24th, 1875 AD (search for this): chapter 42
e case, for the two passed entirely by all of the men. Then I put my horse to a gallop to overtake them. At the same time I saw two mounted men riding toward the servants from the Louisville road. The two mounted men were Munger, of Company C, and the other I took for Tibbet, of E Company. Davis then halted and turned to go back to the tent. William P. Stedman, Company B, Fourth Michigan Cavalry. Captain Charles T. Hudson, Fourth Michigan Cavalry, writes to the Detroit Tribune, July 24th, 1875, as follows: I was not the first to see our distinguished captive, nor did I see him in his disguise at all. Several claim that honor, and, I have no doubt. all speak the truth. On our way back to Macon, however, Mrs. Davis told me, and I will use her own words: I put my waterproof cloak and shawl on Mr. Davis upon the impulse of the moment, not knowing, or having time to think, what else to do, in hopes he might make his escape in that disguise; and I only did what any true woman
December, 1873 AD (search for this): chapter 42
d on, as near as I can recollect, it was a waterproof skirt, and a dark shawl over his head and shoulders. He was about twenty-five rods from camp when stopped. I was one of the guards that went to Fortress Monroe with Davis, and from there we were ordered to Washington, where a statement of the capture was made before the Secretary of War by George Munger, Crittenden, Andrew Bee, and myself. You will find that statement the same as this, or nearly so. James F. Bullard. Detroit, December, 1873. To the Editor of the Tribune:-- Then, as daylight began to appear, the advance were sent to capture the camp. We rode into camp without starting a person until our men gave a yell that soon made a stir. I halted my horse near the largest tent. Some of the boys were about to go into it, but were stopped by the request of a woman inside, saying that there were undressed ladies there. Soon after a woman came to the door of the tent and asked the men who were near if the servants cou
How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. Major General James Harrison Wilson. On the first Sunday of April, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's Church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee, announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial destruction of his army, and the immediate necessity for flight. Although he could not have been entirely unprepared for this intelligence, it appears that he did not receive it with self-possession or dignity; but with tremulous and nervous haste, like a weak man in the hour of misfortune, he left the house of worship and hurried home, where he and his personal staff and servants spent the rest of the day in packing their personal baggage. At nightfall everything was in readiness; even the gold then remaining in the Treasury, not exceeding in all forty thousand dollars, was packed among the baggage, In a recent article Mr. Reagan says: If it is meant by this statement simply that the money in the Treasury (gold and all) was tak
uld find their countenances averted, their hopes abandoned, and their thoughts already committed to submission. But he was to realize very shortly how morally deserted and practically helpless he was. His first discovery of it was at Abbeville, South Carolina, where occurred one of the most pathetic scenes in history, over which the tenderness and charity of some of the actors have been disposed to draw the curtain, committing its sorrows to secrecy. Mr. Davis reached Abbeville on the 1st of May. So far he had been accompanied by the fragments of five brigades, amounting in number to less than one thousand men, and reorganized into two battalions, at the front and in the rear of the long train which signaled his flight and foolishly obstructed his effort at escape. There were already painful evidences of the demoralization of the escort, and the story told almost at every mile, by stragglers from Johnston's command, was not calculated to inspire them. At Abbeville, Mr. Davis re
May 10th, 1365 AD (search for this): chapter 42
ober 15th, 1877. Dear Sir:--Your letter, of September 28th, came to hand in due time, but I have neglected to answer it until now. You wanted a full statement of the capture of Jeff Davis, as I remembered it to be. It has been some time since the capture, but I will give you as full an account of the matter as I can. I don't know as I can give you the conversation of Davis, just as it was, but think I can give you the substance. It was between twelve and one o'clock on the morning of May 10th, 1365, and as soon as we got within a few rods of the camp the regiment was halted and a portion was dismounted, and advanced partly around the camp, and there waited for day; and. as soon as it commenced to get light, the dismounted men charged on the camp, and the mounted men followed after. I was among the mounted men, and as we came into camp I saw a horse that I thought was better than my own, and I stopped to exchange, Corporal George Munger stopping with me. I dismounted to change the
May 10th, 1885 AD (search for this): chapter 42
d their statements are conclusive as to the question of the disguise. It will be observed that none of them say anything whatever about petticoats, and that no officer has ever alleged that any such garment was used. The newspapers which published the first accounts are solely responsible for the very natural assumption that a man disguised in his wife's clothing would not forget the important item of the petticoat. The letters are as follows: October 19th, 1877. On the morning of May 10th, 1885, I was one of the fourteen men under Lieutenant J. G. Dickinson who were dismounted by order of Lieutenant Colonel Pritchard, and directed to enter and guard the camp in which Jefferson Davis and party were supposed to be. I was the first man who entered it, and immediately went to the first of three tents standing on the right-hand side of the road, and raised the flap to enter it. Mrs. Davis, from the inside of the tent, requested me to go back, as there were ladies in there who were n
April, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 42
How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. Major General James Harrison Wilson. On the first Sunday of April, 1865, while seated in St. Paul's Church, in Richmond, Jefferson Davis received a telegram from Lee, announcing the fall of Petersburg, the partial destruction of his army, and the immediate necessity for flight. Although he could not have been entirely unprepared for this intelligence, it appears that he did not receive it with self-possession or dignity; but with tremulous and nervous haste, like a weak man in the hour of misfortune, he left the house of worship and hurried home, where he and his personal staff and servants spent the rest of the day in packing their personal baggage. At nightfall everything was in readiness; even the gold then remaining in the Treasury, not exceeding in all forty thousand dollars, was packed among the baggage, In a recent article Mr. Reagan says: If it is meant by this statement simply that the money in the Treasury (gold and all) was tak
ended, or endeavor to work his way southward into Florida. With the view of frustrating this plan, I now directed all the crossings of the Ocmulgee river, from Atlanta to Hawkinsville, to be watched with renewed vigilance. On the evening of May 6th, having received the intelligence sent in by Yoeman, I directed General Croxton to select the best regiment in his division and to send it under its best officer, with orders to march eastward, by the way of Jeffersonville, to Dublin, on the Ocoed him to issue a proclamation offering a reward of one hundred thousand dollars to be paid out of such money as might be found in the possession of Davis or his party. This was done, and copies scattered throughout the country as early as the 6th of May. As soon as it was known at Atlanta that Davis' cavalry escort had disbanded, General Alexander, with five hundred picked men and horses, of his command, crossed to the right or northern bank of the Chattahoochee river, occupied all the for
rmation in regard to Davis' movements as he had been able to gather. This was about three o'clock in the afternoon. After a conversation between these officers, the precise details of which are variously reported, they separated, Colonel Harnden to rejoin his command, already an hour or more in advance, and Colonel Pritchard continuing his march along the south side of the Ocmulgee. It will be remembered that Colonel Pritchard began his march from the vicinity of Macon, on the evening of May 7th, under verbal orders given him by General Minty, in pursuance of instructions from corps headquarters. His attention was particularly directed to the crossings of the Ocmulgee river, between Hawkinsville and Jacksonville, near the mouth of the Ohoopee, with the object of intercepting Davis and such other rebel chiefs as might be making their way out of the country by the roads in that region. I{e had, however, not gone more than three miles from Abbeville before he obtained from a negro m
September, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 42
s upon which this story rests, as well as to specify the exact articles of woman's apparel which constituted the disguise. It is stated by Lieutenant Dickinson, in writing, that the rebel chieftain was one of the three persons dressed in woman's attire, and that he had a black mantle wrapped about his head, through the top of which could have been seen locks of his hair. Captain G. W. Lawton, Fourth Michigan Cavalry, who published an account of the capture in the Atlantic monthly for September, 1865, asserts explicitly, upon the testimony of the officers present, that Davis, in addition to his full suit of Confederate gray, had on a lady's waterproof (cloak), gathered at the waist, with a shawl drawn over the head, and carrying a tin pail. Colonel Pritchard says, in his official report, that he received from Mrs. Davis, on board the steamer Clyde, off Fortress Monroe, a waterproof cloak or robe of dark or almost black waterproof stuff which was worn by Davis as a disguise, and whi
... 14 15 16 17 18 19