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Jasper (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
r still, inspired by the belief that they were invincible. It will be remembered that after the capture of Selma, on April 2d (which took place at nightfall of the very Sunday that Davis fled from Richmond), and the passage of the victorious cavalry to the south side of the Alabama, their march was directed to the eastward by the way of Montgomery, Columbus, West Point, and Macon; while a detached brigade, under Croxton, moved rapidly in the same direction, by a more northern route, through Jasper, Talladega, and La Grange. The limits of this sketch forbid a detailed narrative of how these gallant troopers captured the last stronghold of the Confederacy, pausing in their march to raise the National flag over the first rebel capitol; how the astonished rebel ladies at the beautiful village of Tuskegee bedecked their horses with flowers as a reward for perfect discipline and good behavior; how they spared one printing press, claimed by a strong-mined woman, upon the condition that she
Allegan, Allegan County, Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
that Mr. Davis had on a hoopskirt, and was otherwise disguised as a woman. This is wholly false. He was dressed in his ordinary clothing, with cavalry boots drawn over his pants, a waterproof over his dress-coat, a shawl thrown over his shoulders, and on his head a broad-brim white or drab Texas hat. He had not an article of female wear about his person. The chief point of difference between Jones and the others appears to be the location of the shawl only. I saw Colonel Pritchard at Allegan, on Friday morning, and he says that he, too, has received various letters on the subject, which he expects to answer, and will lean far toward the woman disguise side of the question. Various conversations he had with Mrs. Davis, he says, will substantiate the fact that she denied nothing. Many thanks for your account in the weekly times of our great ride. It is very interesting. Yours, very truly, Robert Burns. Major General J. H. Wilson, St. Louis. After quoting the fo
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
n anything else in the eyes of the world. But, unfortunately, he accepted the base alternative of continuing his flight, and that, too, with the artifice of a mean disguise. On continuing his journey, accompanied by his wife, whom he had overtaken at Washington, it was determined that the President and his friends should thereafter travel as an emigrant party. Mr. Reagan was still in his company. General Breckenridge had left outside the town of Washington, taking with him forty-five Kentucky soldiers, a straggling remnant of Morgan's Brigade. Ten mounted men had offered to escort Mrs. Davis, and although they had accepted their paroles, justly considered that they might protect a distressed lady from marauders. All tokens of the President's importance, in dress and air, were left aside; a covered wagon, pack-mule, and cooking utensils, were provided at Washington; and it was designed that Mr. Davis, his wife, and his wife's sister, should pass as a simple country family, emig
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
esident and his principal officers, the Shenandoah should be ordered to cruise off the coast of Florida, to take the distinguished fugitives on board, who had selected the coast for their exit from tmself and his principal officers, the Shenandoah should be ordered to cruise off the coast of Florida, to take the fugitives on board. These orders were sent to the rebel cruiser many days before with him, and General Breckenridge only to a point where he thought it convenient to leave for Florida. There were also in the party two or three of his staff officers and a few straggling soldiersd that he would either flee in disguise, unattended, or endeavor to work his way southward into Florida. With the view of frustrating this plan, I now directed all the crossings of the Ocmulgee rived resolution. During that day and the next, the conviction that Davis would try to escape into Florida became so strong, that I sent for General Minty, commanding the Second Division, and directed h
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
e way of Montgomery, Columbus, West Point, and Macon; while a detached brigade, under Croxton, movemulgee river from the mouth of Yellow creek to Macon. General Minty, commanding the Second Divisioting in that region. Beginning his march from Macon, General Alexander, at his own request, was auOcmulgee from the right of Upton's Division to Macon, and in scouting the country to his front and rney, he rode moodily in the cavalcade back to Macon, where first he was to learn the extent of hisew the report, immediately after our return to Macon, for Captain John C. Hathaway, commanding the ubt. all speak the truth. On our way back to Macon, however, Mrs. Davis told me, and I will use hs return march, with prisoners and wagons, for Macon, about one hundred and twenty miles to the norhe President. Mr. Clay surrendered himself at Macon, about the 11th of May, having informed me by ntion, were paroled. When Davis arrived at Macon, he looked bronzed, but hardy and vigorous, an[13 more...]
Columbus (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
victorious cavalry to the south side of the Alabama, their march was directed to the eastward by the way of Montgomery, Columbus, West Point, and Macon; while a detached brigade, under Croxton, moved rapidly in the same direction, by a more northernthe incessant flash of fifty-two cannons, carried the works which covered the bridges across the Chattahoochee river at Columbus. A thousand incidents of daring and hardihood and a thousand scenes of exciting incident might be described. The flashy-five miles, including the passage of the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers, and the capture of the two fortified towns of Columbus and West Point, was made in less than six days. In order to cover the widest possible front of operations, and to obtaid, and in Western and Southwestern Georgia. Detachments of the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry occupied Cuthbert, Eufaula, Columbus and Bainbridge, and kept a vigilant watch over the lower Flint and Chattahoochee, while General McCook, with a detachmen
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
eir way to the Florida coast, and embarking there for a foreign land. The President had clung, at Danville, to the hope that Lee might effect a retreat to Southwestern Virginia, and he had remained there long enough to see that hope disappointed. Again, when he had sought General Johnston's demoralized and inconsiderable army, ith the many rumors from all quarters, indicative of unusual excitement among the rebels, there was little room to doubt that they had met with a great disaster in Virginia; but, as a matter of course, no definite or reliable information as to the extent of the disaster or the probable course that would be adopted by the rebel goverh Generals Cobb and G. W. Smith, on the evening of the 20th of April, I received conclusive information in regard to Lee's surrender, and the course of events in Virginia. The commanding officer of our advanced guard, moving rapidly, had taken possession of this place, and after securing his prisoners, had confined the generals i
Etowah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
the possession of Davis or his party. This was done, and copies scattered throughout the country as early as the 6th of May. As soon as it was known at Atlanta that Davis' cavalry escort had disbanded, General Alexander, with five hundred picked men and horses, of his command, crossed to the right or northern bank of the Chattahoochee river, occupied all the fords west of the Atlanta and Chattanooga Railroad, watched the passes of the Altoona mountains, and the main crossings of the Etowah river, and with various detachments of his small command patrolled the principal roads in that region day and night, until he received news of Davis' capture in another quarter. The final disposition of our forces may be described as follows: General Upton, with parts of two regiments, occupied Augusta, and kept a vigilant watch over the country in that vicinity, informing me by telegraph of everything important which came under his observation. General Winslow, with the larger part of Upton'
High Point (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
er Colonel Eggleston having been sent by rail to that place immediately after the receipt of the telegram just mentioned from General Sherman. General E. M. McCook, with a detachment of seven hundred men, was directed to proceed by rail to. Albany, Georgia, and march thence by the most direct route to Tallahassee, Florida, while General Croxton, with the remainder of this division, was held at Macon, with orders issued subsequently to watch the line of the Ocmulgee river from the mouth of Yellow creek to Macon. General Minty, commanding the Second Division--general Long having been wounded at Selma — was directed, about the same time, to send detachments to Cuthbert and Eufaula, and to watch the line of the Ocmulgee, from the right of the First Division to Abbeville, and as much of the Flint and Chattahoochee, to the rear, as practicable. The ostensible object of this disposition of troops was to secure prisoners and military stores, and to take possession of the important strategic
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
commands so as to have all roads and crossings vigilantly watched. It was thought, at first, that — Davis would call about him a select force. and endeavor to escape by marching to the westward through the hilly country of Northern Georgia. To prevent this, Colonel Eggleston was directed to watch the country in all directions from Atlanta. General A. J. Alexander, with the Second Brigade of Upton's Division, was directed by General Winslow to scout the country to the northward as far as Dalton, or until he should meet the troops under General Steedman operating in that region. Beginning his march from Macon, General Alexander, at his own request, was authorized to detach an officer and twenty picked men, disguised as rebel soldiers, for the purpose of obtaining definite information of Davis' movements. This party was placed under the command of Lieutenant Joseph 0. Yoeman, First Ohio Cavalry, and at the time acting inspector of the brigade. Verbal instructions were also given
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