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t of General Early, where they captured four hundred of the enemy, with Brigadier-General Prince. The two brigades which had hitherto remained with General Ewell upon the mountain now advanced also upon the right, turned the left flank of the Federalists, and captured one piece of artillery. Thus, at every point, the foe was repulsed, and hurled into full retreat. When night settled upon the field they had been driven two miles, Jackson urging on the pursuit with the fresh brigades of Stafford and Field. It was his cherished desire to penetrate to Culpepper Court House, for he would then have struck the centre of Pope's position, and his chief depot of supplies; whence he hoped to be able to crush the fragments of his army before the corps of McDowell could reach him. With this object, he purposed at first to continue the pursuit all night. Ascertaining by his scouts that the enemy had paused in their flight just in his front, he now placed the battery of Pegram in position, a
Cunningham (search for this): chapter 16
atteries of the division, from which the third brigade of Taliaferro had a little. before been removed to the front, to fil the interval between the second, and that of Early. The whole angle of forest was now filled with clamor and horrid rout. The left regiments of the second brigade were taken in reverse, intermingled with the enemy, broken, and massacred from front and rear. The regiments of the right, and especially the 21st Virginia, commanded by the brave Christian soldier, Colonel Cunningham, stood firm, and fought the enemy before them like lions, until the invading line had penetrated within twenty yards of their rear. For the terrific din of the musketry, the smoke, and the dense foliage, concealed friend from foe, until they were only separated from each other by this narrow interval. Their heroic Colonel was slain, the orders of officers were unheard amidst the shouts of the assailants, and all the vast uproar; yet the remnants of the second brigade fought on, man t
Early, where they captured four hundred of the enemy, with Brigadier-General Prince. The two brigades which had hitherto remained with General Ewell upon the mountain now advanced also upon the right, turned the left flank of the Federalists, and captured one piece of artillery. Thus, at every point, the foe was repulsed, and hurled into full retreat. When night settled upon the field they had been driven two miles, Jackson urging on the pursuit with the fresh brigades of Stafford and Field. It was his cherished desire to penetrate to Culpepper Court House, for he would then have struck the centre of Pope's position, and his chief depot of supplies; whence he hoped to be able to crush the fragments of his army before the corps of McDowell could reach him. With this object, he purposed at first to continue the pursuit all night. Ascertaining by his scouts that the enemy had paused in their flight just in his front, he now placed the battery of Pegram in position, and opened a
before him, he pushed his line, in perfect order, to the front of the declivity which descended to the rivulet and the Indian corn. Several batteries on his right and in front were now opened on him, and the wheatfield on the left of the highway was observed full of squadrons of cavalry. Withdrawing his men into a slight depression behind the foremost crest of the hill, he obtained partial shelter from the enemy's artillery, and brought up four guns from the batteries of Captains Brown and Dement, to a favorable position upon his right, whence they engaged the opposing batteries with great credit. But no line of infantry was yet visible before him, for it was masked in the thick corn. The division of Winder had now arrived, and its commander was posting several of its best batteries in echelon along the road in the rear of Early's left, whence they delivered a most effective oblique fire toward the right and front. The second brigade of the division was advanced on the left of
ause I know he will call for it in the morning. August 8th, the division of Ewell, which led the way, bearing off to the northwest, crossed the Rapid Ann at the treme right of Pope. Tho other divisions crossed at Barnett's Ford, below; and Ewell, turning to the east, returned to their line of march, and bore toward Slaughtedar Run, and make their way thence to the Rapid Ann. General Early's brigade of Ewell's division, which held the front, was ordered to advance along the great road ae division of Jackson, commanded by Brigadier-General Winder. The remainder of Ewell's division, consisting of the brigades of Trimble and Hays, (lately Taylor's) dproach; or, if they braved the fire of the mountainbattery, the two brigades of Ewell lay hid in the dense pine thickets which clothed the side of the ridge, ready tadier-General Prince. The two brigades which had hitherto remained with General Ewell upon the mountain now advanced also upon the right, turned the left flank o
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 16
led is less than that of the enemy, we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded whilst ably discharging his duty atthe head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about 1500 small arms, and other ordnance stores. Whilst General Jackson was engaged on the 10th, caring for his killed and wounded, he caused careful reconnoissances to be made under the care of General J. E. B. Stuart, who providentially visited his army on that day, on a tour of inspection. He was convinced by this inquiry, that the army of Pope was receiving constant accessions, and that before he could resume the offensive, it would be swelled to sixty thousand men. The bulk of the forces of McDowell, was upon the march to join the enemy, by a route which seemed to threaten his rear. He therefore determined that it was imprudent to hazard farther offensive movements. Having sent back all hi
ors perceived that the aim of the Confederates was much more accurate than that of the enemy. While the shells of the latter mostly exploded high in the air and above the treetops, those of the former were seen ploughing the ground among the guns of their adversaries, and throwing the dust, with their iron hail, in their midst. But one fated shot from the Federal batteries robbed the patriots of one of the chief ornaments of their army. While General Winder was standing beside the guns of Poague and Carpenter, directing their working with his customary coolness and skill, a shell struck him upon the side, dashed his field-glass from his hand, and inflicted a ghastly wound, of which he died three hours after. No more just or graceful tribute can be paid to his memory, than that of General Jackson's report. It is difficult within the proper reserve of an official report, to do justice to the merits of this accomplished officer. Urged by the medical director to take no part in the m
M. D. Hoge (search for this): chapter 16
's Junction, celebrated the triumphs to be achieved, before they were won, with banners and laurels. The corps returned from Westover to the neigborhood of Richmond, the 10th of July. There they remained until the 17th, preparing for their march; and it was during this respite that General Jackson first made his appearance openly, in the city which he had done so much to deliver. He gives the following account of it in a letter to his wife. Richmond, July 14th. Yesterday I heard Doctor M. D. Hoge preach in his church, and also in the camp of the Stonewall Brigade. It is a great comfort to have the privilege of spending a quiet Sabbath, within the walls of a house dedicated to the service of God. . . . .People are very kind to me. How God, our God, does shower blessings upon me, an unworthy sinner! The manner of his entrance was this. He came tothe church without attendants; and just after the congregation was assembled, they saw an officer who was manifestly a stranger, i
William B. Taliaferro (search for this): chapter 16
ed the rear of the batteries of the division, from which the third brigade of Taliaferro had a little. before been removed to the front, to fil the interval between in which half of Early's brigade was involved. On his extreme left, next to Taliaferro stood the famous 13th Virginia, which, under the gallant leading of its sturdn, and in a moment reinstated the failing battle. The fragments of Early and Taliaferro returned to their places, forming around that heroic nucleus, the 13th Virginheir momentum, the infantry of Branch closed in upon their right, and that of Taliaferro and Early upon their left. Especially did the 13th Virginia now exact a bloa few yards. On both sides of the devoted column, the lines of Branch and of Taliaferro blazed, until it fled to the rear, utterly scattered and dissipated. And nowhe foe yielded the bloody field, and broke into full retreat. The brigade of Taliaferro also charged, bearing toward the right, and pierced the field of Indian corn
back with a fearful slaughter into the stubble field. Scarcely was this Titanic blow delivered, when the fine brigade of Branch, from the division of A. P. Hill, hardly allowing itself time to form, rushed forward to second them, and completed the rn position to ravage their ranks; but, as they forced back the line for a little space by their momentum, the infantry of Branch closed in upon their right, and that of Taliaferro and Early upon their left. Especially did the 13th Virginia now exacthering volley into the huddled mass from the distance of a few yards. On both sides of the devoted column, the lines of Branch and of Taliaferro blazed, until it fled to the rear, utterly scattered and dissipated. And now Jackson's blood was up; aing rapidity and regulated fury. Scarcely was the charge of this cavalry repelled, when he again reinforced the ranks of Branch in front of the bloody stubble field, with the brigades of Archer and of Pender, from the division of Hill, extending the
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