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Sinda (Russia) (search for this): chapter 4
r, all dry now. Major Thomas traveled with me from Fort Mason. We are in camp together. Captain Bradford, whom we knew at Old Point, is on the court. Colonel Chapman, of the infantry, from Georgetown, Captain Marsey, Colonels Bainbridge, Bumford, Ruggles, and Seawell, and Captain Sibley, an old classmate of mine. Colonel Waite is president of the court and Captain Samuel Jones, of the artillery, judge advocate. The latter brought his wife and child with him in a six-mule road wagon from Sinda, about one hundred and twenty miles up the river. All the court are present and yesterday we commenced the trial of our old friend, Giles Porter. I hope he will clear himself of the charges against him. I am writing with much inconvenience from a stiff finger, caused by a puncture from a Spanish bayonet, while pitching my tent on the road, which struck the joint. Every branch and leaf in this country nearly are armed with a point, and some seem to poison the flesh. What a blessed thing t
Christmas (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
y, and calls for their early disbandment. They may suit themselves in everything relating to my services, and whenever they tell me they are no longer required they will not be obtruded on them. Two months later Lieutenant-Colonel Lee was at Fort Brown, Texas, with thoughts filled with the approaching Christmas and his family's happiness. He Writes in December, 1856: The time is approaching when I trust many of you will be assembled around the family hearth at dear Arlington another Christmas. Though absent, my heart will be in the midst of you, and I shall enjoy in imagination and memory all that is going on. May nothing occur to mar or cloud the family fireside, and may each be able to look back with pride and pleasure at their deeds of the past year, and with confidence and hope to that in prospect. I can do nothing but hope and pray for you all. Last Saturday I visited Matamoras, Mexico, for the first time. The town looked neat, though much out at the elbow, and nothing
Arlington (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
be so, and that you and particularly all at Arlington and our friends elsewhere are well. The stethers? I hope you had a joyous Christmas at Arlington, and that it may be long and often repeated.ording to our own notions. Mr. Custis, of Arlington, was very fond of cats, and his large yellowthe Long Bridge. [Spans the Potomac between Arlington and Washington.] It will be an injury to theld pounce upon a kid as Tom Tita [the cat at Arlington] would on a mouse, and would whistle like a s father-in-law, Mr. Custis, recalled him to Arlington in the fall of that year; but he returned ast posterity. These articles were taken from Arlington, General McClellan writes, and put into the onel Lee was enjoying the hospitality of his Arlington home; having asked for the second furlough, ert Ould, and Lee returned to Washington and Arlington, and in a short time was again on his way to Once more, and for the last time, he was with his family under the roof of stately old Arlington. [1 more...]
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 4
command of its colonel, Major Hardee being the only other field officer who accompanied it, Lee and Thomas being on court-martial detail. The regiment was destined for the next few years to be stationed at the various posts of western Texas, and its duty was to protect the scalp of the settler from the tomahawk of the savage. Texas has an area of two hundred and seventy-four thousand square miles, or one hundred and fifty million acres of land, and is two and a half times the area of Great Britain and Ireland. In order to watch over such a stretch of frontier it was necessary to divide the regiment up so that only a few companies occupied the same post. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee arrived in Texas in March, 1856: To Mrs. Lee he writes from San Antonio on March 20, 1856: To-morrow I leave for Fort Mason, where Colonel Johnston and six companies of the regiment are stationed. Major Hardee and four companies are in camp on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, about forty miles from Belknap
London, Madison County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
as his constant attendant. Some of his household naturally grew fond of these animals, his son-in-law being among them. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee would not cut the skirt of his robe, as did Mohammed, to prevent disturbing his cat, which was sleeping on it, nor, like Cardinal Wolsey, give audience with a cat seated beside him, nor let his cat rest among his papers and books, as did Richelieu, nor wish a statue with his right hand resting on his cat, as did Whittington, the famous Lord Mayor of London, but he liked to see a well-fed puss, such as Gray described in his ode On the death of a favorite cat : Her conscious tail her joy disclosed, The fair round face, the snowy beard, The relish of her paws; Her coat that with the tortoise vies, Her ears of jet and emerald eyes, She saw and purr'd applause. From Fort Brown, Texas, February 16, 1857, he tells Mrs. Lee: Tell your father Mrs. Colonel Waite has a fine large cat which she takes with her everywhere. He is her companion by d
Matamoras (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
when I trust many of you will be assembled around the family hearth at dear Arlington another Christmas. Though absent, my heart will be in the midst of you, and I shall enjoy in imagination and memory all that is going on. May nothing occur to mar or cloud the family fireside, and may each be able to look back with pride and pleasure at their deeds of the past year, and with confidence and hope to that in prospect. I can do nothing but hope and pray for you all. Last Saturday I visited Matamoras, Mexico, for the first time. The town looked neat, though much out at the elbow, and nothing apparently going on of interest. The plaza or square was inclosed and the trees and grass flourishing, for which I am told the city is indebted to Major William Chapman, of the Quartermaster's Department, who made the improvement while it was in the occupation of the American army. The most attractive thing to me in town were the orange trees loaded with unripe fruit. The oleander was in full b
Poland (Poland) (search for this): chapter 4
ssary to divide the regiment up so that only a few companies occupied the same post. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee arrived in Texas in March, 1856: To Mrs. Lee he writes from San Antonio on March 20, 1856: To-morrow I leave for Fort Mason, where Colonel Johnston and six companies of the regiment are stationed. Major Hardee and four companies are in camp on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, about forty miles from Belknap. I presume I shall go there. I have left it with Mr. Radiminski (a native of Poland and a lieutenant in the Second Cavalry) to make provision for the journey, and have merely indicated that I should be content with a boiled ham, hard bread, a bottle of molasses, and one of extract of coffee-all of which have been provided. Lee was afterward stationed at Camp Cooper, on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, so named in honor of Samuel Cooper, then adjutant general of the army; and from that point in June, 1856, he was dispatched with four companies of his regiment on an expedition
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. His term of office at West Point terminated by his assignment to cavalry. The great civilizing arms of the Uns to relieve the frontier settlements, but to furnish places for graduates of West Point and the friends of the Secretary of War, stating that the object of Mr. Pierc the army. This officer, who afterward became so distinguished, graduated at West Point in 1826, and was assigned as a lieutenant to the Second Infantry. His subseqood were among its first lieutenants. Secretary of War Davis graduated at West Point in 1828, two years after Albert Sidney Johnston and one year before Robert E.ith a national reputation, stood in the front rank of military engineers. At West Point he had been instructed in cavalry, artillery, and infantry tactics, and, like[Jefferson Davis, then Secretary of War] for the removal of Professor Sprole [West Point]. It makes out a severe charge against the Secretary, the merits of which, th
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
lap and on my bed; he follows me all about the house and stands at the door in an attitude of defiance at all passing dogs. In the November following he was in Kansas, having been temporarily detached from his regiment and detailed to serve as a member of a court-martial ordered to convene to try an assistant surgeon of the arms while a drop of blood remains and by hanging, if you must. Nine years afterward in Virginia the rope was placed in uncomfortable proximity to his own neck. Kansas when a Territory, and an applicant for admission to the American Union, was made the abolition battlefield; John Brown went there, of course, for agitation was th to danger, he at once volunteered as aid-de-camp to Lee, asked and received permission to accompany him, and was the first to recognize Brown, having seen him in Kansas. Afterward he became the great cavalry chieftain of the Army Lee commanded. The prisoners at Harper's Ferry were at once turned over to the United States Distri
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
reely tendered. His fanaticism grew, and his zeal knew no proper bounds. Virginia was selected as the best point to carry out his plans. There he would incite the negroes to rebellion and furnish them with arms from the United States Arsenal. In his madness he pictured a great and growing army of black recruits from all portions of the Southern States. War for the extermination of slavery should begin in the State where the Dutch first landed the negro. The choice was approved by New England supporters who lost their money while Brown lost his life. Lee went to Harper's Ferry. The marines, under their gallant officers, battered down the door of the engine-house into which he had fled with a portion of his men for refuge from the aroused citizens. Brown was captured, tried, convicted, and hung on the 2d of December, 1859. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee, from Harper's Ferry, December 1, 1859, says in a letter to his wife: I arrived here yesterday, about noon, with four companies
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