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y force in that direction and then turn upon Pemberton. But by moving against Jackson, I uncoveredn in my mind was to have a force confronting Pemberton if he should come out to attack my rear. Th13th Johnston sent the following dispatch to Pemberton at Edward's station: I have lately arrived, in of success. I naturally expected that Pemberton would endeavor to obey the orders of his supned it more than a week before. On the 15th Pemberton had actually marched south from Edward's sta. They reported that they had passed through Pemberton's army in the night, and that it was still mernand's advance. Champion's Hill, where Pemberton had chosen his position to receive us, whethe others until it reaches Edward's station. Pemberton's lines covered all these roads, and faced eground as I did afterwards, I cannot see how Pemberton could have escaped with any organized force.. Loring's division, which was the right of Pemberton's line, was cut off from the retreating army[4 more...]
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 35
as a waste of time and material. General Joseph E. Johnston arrived at Jackson in the night of to do; as shown further on, he was directed by Johnston to make this very move. I notified Genera troops that had been driven out of Raymond. Johnston had been reinforced during the night by Georgment or McPherson's pressure had no doubt led Johnston to order a retreat, leaving only the men at taign. I slept that night in the room that Johnston was said to have occupied the night before. im. I declined. On the night of the 13th Johnston sent the following dispatch to Pemberton at Eerstood each other. He delivered his copy of Johnston's dispatch to McPherson who forwarded it to mrning back to Bolton, the nearest point where Johnston could reach the road. Bolton is about twentyds, so as to divide your troops and train. Johnston stopped on the Canton road only six miles noron the 16th a repetition of his order to join Johnston at Clinton, he concluded to obey, and sent a
o take, but with a start of four miles. One (Osterhaus) was at Raymond, on a converging road that i(Carr's) had to pass over the same road with Osterhaus, but being back at Mississippi Springs, woulht of the 15th Hovey was at Bolton; Carr and Osterhaus were about three miles south, but abreast, fons by the southernmost of these roads, and Osterhaus and Carr by the middle road. Orders were tonemy's pickets, who were speedily driven in. Osterhaus, on the middle road, hearing the firing, pusirmishers of Carr's division just coming in. Osterhaus was farther south and soon after came up wit follow the retreating foe. I sent orders to Osterhaus to pursue the enemy, and to Carr, whom I saw the Big Black, and to cross it if he could; Osterhaus to follow him. The pursuit was continued unted at all, except that as described before. Osterhaus's and A. J. Smith's divisions had encounterethe line of the road to Vicksburg. Carr and Osterhaus were at Edward's station, and Blair was abou
D. R. Ransom (search for this): chapter 35
came up with Logan himself. I found him near the road leading down to Baker's Creek. He was actually in command of the only road over which the enemy could retreat; Hovey, reinforced by two brigades from McPherson's command, confronted the enemy's left; Crocker, with two brigades, covered their left flank; McClernand two hours before, had been within two miles and a half of their centre with two divisions, and the two divisions, Blair's and A. J. Smith's, were confronting the rebel right; Ransom, with a brigade of McArthur's division of the 17th corps (McPherson's), had crossed the river at Grand Gulf a few days before, and was coming up on their right flank. Neither Logan nor I knew that we had cut off the retreat of the enemy. Just at this juncture a messenger came from Hovey, asking for more reinforcements. There were none to spare. I then gave an order to move McPherson's command by the left flank around to Hovey. This uncovered the rebel line of retreat, which was soon ta
mond, on a converging road that intersected the other near Champion's Hill; one (Carr's) had to pass over the same road with Osterhaus, but being back at Mississippi ickets and capturing several men. The night of the 15th Hovey was at Bolton; Carr and Osterhaus were about three miles south, but abreast, facing west; Smith was d A. J. Smith's divisions by the southernmost of these roads, and Osterhaus and Carr by the middle road. Orders were to move cautiously with skirmishers to the fronto where the middle road intersects the north road, and found the skirmishers of Carr's division just coming in. Osterhaus was farther south and soon after came up wiollow the retreating foe. I sent orders to Osterhaus to pursue the enemy, and to Carr, whom I saw personally, I explained the situation and directed him to pursue vigto six miles west of the battle-field, along the line of the road to Vicksburg. Carr and Osterhaus were at Edward's station, and Blair was about three miles south-ea
John A. Logan (search for this): chapter 35
ade preparatory to an assault. McPherson brought up Logan's division while he deployed Crocker's for the assauith Blair in his rear. McPherson's command, with Logan in front, had marched at seven o'clock, and by four McPherson brought up his troops as fast as possible, Logan in front, and posted them on the right of Hovey and across the flank of the enemy. Logan reinforced Hovey with one brigade from his division; with his other two h enemy's line, and they did good execution. From Logan's position now a direct forward movement carried himf my staff by our right around, until I came up with Logan himself. I found him near the road leading down to re, and was coming up on their right flank. Neither Logan nor I knew that we had cut off the retreat of the e time, Hovey, reinforced as he was by a brigade from Logan and another from Crocker, and by Crocker gallantly c doubt a good part of them returned to their homes. Logan alone captured 1,300 prisoners and eleven guns. Hov
position for the night in good order. On the night of the 13th, McPherson was ordered to march at early dawn upon Jackson, only fifteen miles away. Sherman was given the same order; but he was to move by the direct road from Raymond to Jackson, which is south of the road McPherson was on and does not approach within two miles of it at the point where it crossed the line of intrenchments which, at that time, defended the city. McClernand was ordered to move one division of his command to Clinton, one division a few miles beyond Mississippi Springs following Sherman's line, and a third to Raymond. He was also directed to send his siege guns, four in number, with the troops going by Mississippi Springs. McClernand's position was an advantageous one in any event. With one division at Clinton he was in position to reinforce McPherson, at Jackson, rapidly if it became necessary; the division beyond Mississippi Springs was equally available to reinforce Sherman; the one at Raymond cou
. I found him near the road leading down to Baker's Creek. He was actually in command of the only road over which the enemy could retreat; Hovey, reinforced by two brigades from McPherson's command, confronted the enemy's left; Crocker, with two brigades, covered their left flank; McClernand two hours before, had been within two miles and a half of their centre with two divisions, and the two divisions, Blair's and A. J. Smith's, were confronting the rebel right; Ransom, with a brigade of McArthur's division of the 17th corps (McPherson's), had crossed the river at Grand Gulf a few days before, and was coming up on their right flank. Neither Logan nor I knew that we had cut off the retreat of the enemy. Just at this juncture a messenger came from Hovey, asking for more reinforcements. There were none to spare. I then gave an order to move McPherson's command by the left flank around to Hovey. This uncovered the rebel line of retreat, which was soon taken advantage of by the ene
William Porter (search for this): chapter 35
13th were annulled by new ones. McPherson was ordered at daylight to move on Clinton, ten miles from Jackson; Sherman was notified of my determination to capture Jackson and work from there westward. He was ordered to start at four in the morning and march to Raymond. McClernand was ordered to march with three divisions by Dillon's to Raymond. One was left to guard the crossing of the Big Black. On the 10th I had received a letter from Banks, on the Red River, asking reinforcements. Porter had gone to his assistance with a part of his fleet on the 3d, and I now wrote to him describing my position and declining to send any troops. I looked upon side movements as long as the enemy held Port Hudson and Vicksburg as a waste of time and material. General Joseph E. Johnston arrived at Jackson in the night of the 13th from Tennessee, and immediately assumed command of all the Confederate troops in Mississippi. I knew he was expecting reinforcements from the south and east. On
J. A. McClernand (search for this): chapter 35
cPherson's command had got out of the town. McClernand withdrew from the front of the enemy, at Edwnts which, at that time, defended the city. McClernand was ordered to move one division of his commth the troops going by Mississippi Springs. McClernand's position was an advantageous one in any ev Auburn with a different road to pass over. McClernand faced about and moved promptly. His cavalryson out to Clinton. On my arrival I ordered McClernand to move early in the morning on Edward's staow Hovey's division as closely as possible. McClernand had two roads about three miles apart, conves, and Blair of Sherman's, temporarily under McClernand, were moving. Hovey of McClernand's commandMcClernand's command was with McPherson, farther north on the road from Bolton direct to Edward's station. The middle rfront of the enemy and march back as far as McClernand had to advance to get into battle, and substmore than one-third of his division. Had McClernand come up with reasonable promptness, or had I[13 more...]
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