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Zollicoffer (search for this): chapter 6
purpose to give him no such commission. He never, for a moment, thought of making him more than a colonel. To this the major demurs, and furnishes a voluminous correspondence to prove that his claims for the position of brigadier-general had been recognized by the Secretary of War. August 13 The President sent to the department an interesting letter from Mr. Zollicoffer, in Tennessee, relating to the exposed condition of the country, and its capacities for defense. August 14 Zollicoffer has been appointed a brigadiergen-eral; and although not a military man by education, I think he will make a good officer. August 15 No clew yet to the spies in office who furnish the Northern press with information. The matter will pass uninvestigated. Such is our indifference to everything but desperate fighting. The enemy will make good use of this species of information. August 16 The President is sick, and goes to the country. I did not know until to-day that he is bl
L. P. Walker (search for this): chapter 6
reduction of the rebellion is not a practicable thing. August 4 To-day Mr. Walker inquired where my son Custis was. I told him he was with his mother at Newberdoor, I asked him if he did not think some one should act as Secretary during Mr. Walker's absence. He replied quickly, and with interest, in the affirmative. There A. T. Bledsoe discharge the duties of Secretary of War during the absence of Mr. Walker. This I sent by a messenger to the President, who signed it. Then I infed a storm; for several of the employees, supposed to be in the confidence of Mr. Walker, designated the proceeding as an outrage; and some went so far as to intimate quietly and with all the dignity of which he was capable. August 20 Secretary Walker returned last night, having heard of the death of Col. Jones before reachident still there, although marked immediate. And there are no indications of Mr. Walker's quitting office that I can see. August 22 Immediate is still there; b
Pendleton (search for this): chapter 6
is was. I told him he was with his mother at Newbern, N. C. He authorized me to telegraph him to return, and he should be appointed to a clerkship. August 5 Col. Bledsoe has a job directly from the President: which is to adapt the volume of U. S. Army Regulations to the service of the Confederate States. It is only to strike out U. S. and insert C. S., and yet the colonel groans over it. August 6 Custis arrived and entered upon the discharge of his duties. August 7 Saw Col. Pendleton to-day, but it was not the first time. I have seen him in the pulpit, and heard him preach good sermons. He is an Episcopal minister. He it was that plowed such destruction through the ranks of the invaders at Manassas. At first the battery did no execution; perceiving this, he sighted the guns himself and fixed the range. Then exclaiming, Fire, boys! and may God have mercy on their guilty souls! he beheld the lanes made through the regiments of the enemy. Since then he has been
Judah P. Benjamin (search for this): chapter 6
kindling wood of the piano, sofas, etc. August 10 Mr. Benjamin is a frequent visitor at the department, and is very so that he aspires to become, some day, Secretary of War. Mr. Benjamin, unquestionably, will have great influence with the Predent and Gen. Beauregard; and I am amazed to learn that Mr. Benjamin is inimical to Gen. B. I know nothing of the foundationanassas, and now in a dying condition. Meeting with Mr. Benjamin this morning, near the Secretary's door, I asked him ifn a card with a pencil, not omitting to use the name of Mr. Benjamin, and sent it up. A moment after the President came down send me the order. I retired immediately, and finding Mr. Benjamin still in the hall of the department, informed him of my's office. It was not long before I perceived the part Mr. Benjamin and I had acted was likely to breed a storm; for severaas an outrage; and some went so far as to intimate that Mr. Benjamin's motive was to have some of his partisans appointed to
A. T. Bledsoe (search for this): chapter 6
diate. large numbers of cavalry offering. great preparations in the North. August 1 Col. Bledsoe again threatens to resign, and again declares he will get the President to appoint me to his ized me to telegraph him to return, and he should be appointed to a clerkship. August 5 Col. Bledsoe has a job directly from the President: which is to adapt the volume of U. S. Army Regulationsexcept among the Jews, some of whom are converting their effects into gold and departing. Col. Bledsoe's ankles are much too weak for his weighty body, but he can shuffle along quite briskly when formity with his suggestion, I repaired to Adjutant-General Cooper, who wrote the order that A. T. Bledsoe discharge the duties of Secretary of War during the absence of Mr. Walker. This I sent by a messenger to the President, who signed it. Then I informed Col. Bledsoe of what had been done, and he proceeded without delay to the Secretary's office. It was not long before I perceived the p
is an Episcopal minister. He it was that plowed such destruction through the ranks of the invaders at Manassas. At first the battery did no execution; perceiving this, he sighted the guns himself and fixed the range. Then exclaiming, Fire, boys! and may God have mercy on their guilty souls! he beheld the lanes made through the regiments of the enemy. Since then he has been made a colonel, and will some day be a general; for he was a fellow-cadet at West Point with the President and Bishop Polk. A tremendous excitement! The New York Herald has been received, containing a pretty accurate list of our military forces in the different camps of the Confederate States, with names and grades of the general officers. The Secretary told me that if he had required such a list, a more correct one could not have been furnished him. Who is the traitor? Is he in the AdjutantGen-eral's office? Many suppose so; and some accuse Gen. Cooper, simply because he is a Northern man by birth.
Virginians (search for this): chapter 6
the enemy, and stimulated the Abolitionists to renewed efforts. I suppose these critics would have us forbear to injure the invader, for fear of maddening him. They are making this war; we must make it terrible. With them war is a new thing, and they will not cease from it till the novelty wears off, and all their fighting men are sated with blood and bullets. It must run its course, like the measles. We must both bleed them and deplete their pockets. August 30 Gen. Floyd has had a fight in the West, and defeated an Ohio regiment. I trust they were of the Puritan stock, and not the descendants of Virginians. August 31 We have bad news to-day. My wife and children are the bearers of it. They returned to the city with the tidings that all the women and children were ordered to leave Newbern. The enemy have attacked and taken Fort Hatteras, making many prisoners, and threaten Newbern next. This is the second time my family have been compelled to fly. But they are well.
Sam Jones (search for this): chapter 6
on the plains of Manassas, the 4th Alabama Regiment had to fall back a few hundred yards, and it was impossible to bear Col. Jones, wounded, from the field, as he was large and unwieldy. When the enemy came up, some half dozen of their men volunteer remain with him as a guard. Soon after our line advanced, and with such impetuosity as to sweep everything before it. Col. Jones was rescued, and his guard made prisoners. But, for their attention to him, he asked their release, which was granted.re to leave him. August 18 Nothing worthy of note. August 19 The Secretary has gone to Orange C. H., to see Col. Jones, of the 4th Alabama, wounded at Manassas, and now in a dying condition. Meeting with Mr. Benjamin this morning, neathe dignity of which he was capable. August 20 Secretary Walker returned last night, having heard of the death of Col. Jones before reaching his destination. I doubt whether the Secretary would have thought a second time of what had been done
Francis P. Blair (search for this): chapter 6
tures, broke the statues, and made kindling wood of the piano, sofas, etc. August 10 Mr. Benjamin is a frequent visitor at the department, and is very sociable: some intimations have been thrown out that he aspires to become, some day, Secretary of War. Mr. Benjamin, unquestionably, will have great influence with the President, for he has studied his character most carefully. He will be familiar not only with his likes, but especially with his dislikes. It is said the means used by Mr. Blair to hold Gen. Jackson, consisted not so much in a facility of attaching strong men to him as his friends, but in aiming fatal blows at the great. leaders who had incurred the enmity of the President. Thus Calhoun was incessantly pursued. August 11 There is a whisper that something like a rupture has occurred between the President and Gen. Beauregard; and I am amazed to learn that Mr. Benjamin is inimical to Gen. B. I know nothing of the foundation for the report; but it is said that
ed so conspicuously before me where I sat that it was impossible not to see it. It was marked, too, immediate. August 21 Called in again by the Secretary to-day, I find the ominous communication to the President still there, although marked immediate. And there are no indications of Mr. Walker's quitting office that I can see. August 22 Immediate is still there; but the Secretary has not yet been to the council board, though yesterday was cabinet day. Yet the President sends Capt. Josselyn regularly with the papers referred to the Secretary. These are always given to me, and after they are briefed, delivered to the Secretary. Among these I see some pretty sharp pencil marks. Among the rest, the whole batch of Tochman papers being returned unread, with the injunction that when papers of such volume are sent to him for perusal, it is the business of the Secretary to see that a brief abstract of their contents accompany them. August 23 No arms yet of any amount fr
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