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R. Bruce Ricketts (search for this): chapter 13
marching to join him. McDowell, having information of my approach, delayed his march, detaching Ricketts's division to hold me in check at Thoroughfare Gap. The first passage at arms of the day wa the south side. Drayton's brigade was held in rear. By the time the troops were so disposed, Ricketts's division was well deployed along the plateau on the east. Benning put Major Waddell, withPass and the crossing of one of Hood's brigades, gave the Confederates commanding position, and Ricketts withdrew in time to escape disaster. About six o'clock McDowell put his troops on the countand to a place of rest. At one A. M. the division was withdrawn and marched back to Manassas. Ricketts, finding himself in isolated position at Gainesville, left at daylight and marched to Bristoe. e impression that King's division was still occupying the ground of the late conflict, and that Ricketts's division was not far away; but these divisions had been removed to points before mentioned, t
Robert Toombs (search for this): chapter 13
s on the 24th. Meanwhile, General Pope had received the divisions of Kearny and Reynolds from McClellan's army, forty-five hundred and twenty-five hundred respectively. About this time a letter came to Headquarters of the right wing from General Toombs, expressing regret at his unfortunate mistake in relieving his troops from picket service, and asking to be released from arrest, that he might have the opportunity to show in the approaching conflicts his deep interest in the cause. The adjIndians had doubtless often contested ages ago, that the seasoned soldiers of our civilized armies now battled for right of way. Finding his passage over the mountain by the left side of the Gap blocked by the mountain tangle, Jones called up Toombs's brigade, under command of Colonel Benning, and ordered it over the mountain obstacle by the south side. Drayton's brigade was held in rear. By the time the troops were so disposed, Ricketts's division was well deployed along the plateau on th
Lafayette McLaws (search for this): chapter 13
ad just been killed; just then a shell came screaming by, exploded, and dashed its fragments into the ground near enough to dust us a little. Dad drat those Yankees! he said; if I had known that they were going to throw such things as that at a fellow, I would have stayed in Texas. He had travelled a thousand miles to volunteer in the same company with his brother. Assured of the transfer of McClellan's forces from the James, General Lee called up the divisions of Generals D. H. Hill, McLaws, the half division under J. G. Walker, and Hampton's cavalry from Richmond. Anderson's division was marching from Orange Court-House as our reserve force. On the 22d, Munford's cavalry reported the Warrenton road open as far as the vicinity of General Pope's headquarters. General Stuart was ordered over, with parts of his brigades, to investigate and make trouble in the enemy's rear. He crossed at Waterloo and Hunt's Mill with fifteen hundred troopers and Pelham's horse artillery, and
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 13: making ready for Manassas again. General Lee modifies his order of march continuous skirmishing cavalry commander Stuart gets into General Pope's Headquarters and captures his personal equipment his uniform coat and hat shown along the Confederate lines Jackson's superb flank movement Confederates capture trains, supplies, munitions, and prisoners Hooker and Ewell at Bristoe Station Jackson first on the old field of Bull Run Longstreet's command joins passing Thoroughfare Gap Pope practically throws responsibility for aggressive action on McDowell preliminary fighting General Pope surprised by Jackson Pope's orders to Fitz John Porter. Under the retrograde of the Union army, General Lee so modified his order of march as to meet the new conditions. On the 20th of August the march was made, the right wing to the vicinity of Kelly's Ford on the Rappahannock River, the left to the railroad bridge and fords above. At Kelly's Ford it seemed possible
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 13: making ready for Manassas again. General Lee modifies his order of march continuous skirmishing cavalry commander Stuart gets into General Pope's Headquarters and captures hed by Jackson Pope's orders to Fitz John Porter. Under the retrograde of the Union army, General Lee so modified his order of march as to meet the new conditions. On the 20th of August the marcn time to refresh his men on the good things of the captures and for several hours of sleep. Fitzhugh Lee, with three regiments of cavalry, was ordered on to Fairfax Court-House and along the railroaat his escape to the north side of Bull Run would put his army in a position of safety before General Lee could join him. It was late, the sun had set, but Jackson was moved to prompt action, as the only means of arresting and holding Pope for General Lee's arrival. He was in plain view of the white smoke of the rifles of my infantry as they climbed over Bull Run Mountain, seven miles away, and
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 13
t at a fellow, I would have stayed in Texas. He had travelled a thousand miles to volunteer in the same company with his brother. Assured of the transfer of McClellan's forces from the James, General Lee called up the divisions of Generals D. H. Hill, McLaws, the half division under J. G. Walker, and Hampton's cavalry from Riche west bank. The high water cut off all operations by direct moves on the 24th. Meanwhile, General Pope had received the divisions of Kearny and Reynolds from McClellan's army, forty-five hundred and twenty-five hundred respectively. About this time a letter came to Headquarters of the right wing from General Toombs, expressitzhugh Lee, with three regiments of cavalry, was ordered on to Fairfax Court-House and along the railroad towards Alexandria to cut off rail connection. General McClellan reached Alexandria, Virginia, on the 27th. On the 28th, Jackson was first to move at 12.20 A. M. He applied the torch to the stores of provisions, and march
Eliakim P. Scammon (search for this): chapter 13
of New Jersey, just landed from the cars from Alexandria, advanced and made a desperate effort to recover the lost position and equipage at Manassas Junction. Field's, Archer's, Pender's, and Thomas's brigades, moving towards the railroad bridge, met Taylor's command and engaged it, at the same time moving towards its rear, threatening to cut off its retreat. It was driven back after a fierce struggle, General Taylor, commanding, mortally wounded. Part of the Kanawha division under General Scammon was ordered to its support, but was only in time to assist in its retreat. Reporting this affair, General Jackson said,--The advance was made with great spirit and determination, and under a leader worthy of a better cause. The spoils were then quietly divided, such as could be consumed or hauled off, and the balance given to the torch. I marched from the Rappahannock, following on Jackson's trail, and camped at White Plains. The march during the day was delayed about an hour b
Rufus King (search for this): chapter 13
for its crossing of the Warrenton turnpike, and King's division of his own corps down the turnpike. un, hardly had time for rest, when the march of King's division was reported. About the same time tederate cavalry loitering along the way. As King's division was marching by, Jackson thought to e's orders were given under the impression that King's division was still occupying the ground of thspecial instructions had been sent McDowell and King to hold the position at all hazards, to prevent that Jackson had no thought of retreating, and King had found that his ground was not tenable. The order intended for King failed to reach him. Before he was advised of the withdrawal of King's er. As soon as advised of the withdrawal of King's division from the ground of the 28th, Generall Porter should push forward with his corps and King's division of McDowell's command to Gainesville objected to the transfer of his division under King to other authority, which brought out the joint[3 more...]
T. T. Munford (search for this): chapter 13
James, General Lee called up the divisions of Generals D. H. Hill, McLaws, the half division under J. G. Walker, and Hampton's cavalry from Richmond. Anderson's division was marching from Orange Court-House as our reserve force. On the 22d, Munford's cavalry reported the Warrenton road open as far as the vicinity of General Pope's headquarters. General Stuart was ordered over, with parts of his brigades, to investigate and make trouble in the enemy's rear. He crossed at Waterloo and Huntlittle after sunset he reached the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, a march of thirty miles. Approaching the station, trains were heard on the rails. General Ewell divided his force and took two points on the rails, so as to cut off the trains. Munford's cavalry assisted in the job. Two trains and a number of prisoners were taken, the greater part of the detachment at the station making safe retreat. His plans against General Lee's right cut off by the high water, General Pope extended his ri
retreat. His plans against General Lee's right cut off by the high water, General Pope extended his right, under Sigel, Banks, and Reno, in search of Jackson up the river, who meanwhile had spirited himself away looking towards Pope's rear. I was Pope stood on the evening of the 27th: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Porter's corps, 18,000,--in all 54,500 men, with 4000 cavalry; Platt's brigade, route by the railroad for Bristoe Station, ordered Porter's Fifth Corps to remain at Warrenton Junction till relieved by Banks's corps, then to push on towards Gainesville, Banks to follow by the railroad route. In the afternoon, Hooker encountBanks to follow by the railroad route. In the afternoon, Hooker encountered Ewell at Bristoe Station, where the divisions engaged in a severe fight, which was handsomely maintained till after night. Ewell, under his orders, withdrew to join Jackson. The conduct of the affair was about equally creditable to the comman
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