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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). Search the whole document.

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Edward Grosvenor (search for this): chapter 155
James J. Donohoe, acting commissary of subsistance; Capt. E. G. Dudley, provost-marshal; Capt. Edward Grosvenor, inspector; Capt. A. Whedon, acting aide-de-camp, have each and all discharged their dutkirmish line very cautiously. Our line was handled very skillfully, but with boldness, by Captain Grosvenor, brigade inspector. The trains being safely guarded to a place of safety within our new lighty-ninth Ohio, commanded by Colonel Carlton. This regiment being very small, I allowed Captain Grosvenor, at his earnest request, to go forward upon its left flank with 100 picked men from the Seventeenth Ohio, under Captains Noles and Inskeep. Captain Grosvenor's command and Colonel Carlton's skirmishers appear to have vied with each other in gallantry, and from all the facts I can learn rerailroad. I would not assert it positively, but from all the facts I have learned Carlton and Grosvenor led the first of our troops who cut the railroad. During the day and night my brigade capture
tment having expired. 12th, 13th, and 14th, remained in position. On the 13th the Twenty-fourth Illinois rejoined the brigade, having been relieved from garrison duty at Kingston. On the 15th advanced to the front one mile in line of battle. The Thirty-first Ohio, having been relieved from duty with the supply train, rejoined the brigade. On the 16th moved forward half a mile to a new position, in line of battle. On the 17th moved forward in front of enemy's fortifications, occupied by French's division, of Loring's corps. On the 18th made gradual approaches to the enemy's works. 19th, enemy evacuated his works; brigade moved forward to a position in line of battle one mile west of KIenesaw Mountain. On the 20th remained in position. On the 21st moved to the right three-quarters of a mile, in line of battle. 22d, 23d, and 24th, remained in position. 25th, moved two and a half miles southeast and bivouacked in an open field. 26th, moved into position in line of battle thre
Absalom Baird (search for this): chapter 155
ur rear line. See map: Zzz At this time General Baird gave the order that this brigade should advance orough during the night, and sent the reports to General Baird. About daylight on the morning of the 31st I wey on the Jonesborough road; reported the same to General Baird, who ordered Captain Morgan, Seventh Indiana Bat I was visited by Major-General Sherman and Brigadier-General Baird, who ordered me to send one or two good reeneral Carlin's division, had moved forward, and General Baird, commanding in person, with my brigade in advancing about two and a half miles to the front, and General Baird being desirous to get his troops on it as soon a learning his condition I obtained permission of General Baird and sent the Eighty-second Indiana and Thirty-fi. On the morning of the 1st, by direction of General Baird, I withdrew my troops from the railroad. At 12 sault having commenced, I received an order from General Baird, through Major Connolly, to move farther to the
J. A. Connolly (search for this): chapter 155
at --Creek; passed the Second Brigade and formed a line of battle; was soon ordered to move to the front, our troops now having engaged the enemy and a brisk fight going on about one mile north of Jonesborough. On coming up I found Moore's brigade, of Carlin's division, and Este's, of ours, about ready to assault the enemy's works; received orders to support their lines; formed my brigade at a double-quick. The assault having commenced, I received an order from General Baird, through Major Connolly, to move farther to the right and support Este if necessary; moved rapidly up within about 150 yards of Este's line and ordered my men to cheer the gallant fellows who were then driving the enemy from his works. This they did with a will, knowing that their old comrades, with whom they had stood side by side at Perryville, Stone's River, Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, and Mission Ridge, and all through the great campaign, were in the deadly breach. But it was soon over. The work was done
Baird being desirous to get his troops on it as soon as possible, ordered me to send out a force of one regiment, to be supported by a like force from Este's brigade, with instructions to push forward, if possible, to the railroad and cut it. I sent the Eighty-ninth Ohio, commanded by Colonel Carlton. This regiment being very small, I allowed Captain Grosvenor, at his earnest request, to go forward upon its left flank with 100 picked men from the Seventeenth Ohio, under Captains Noles and Inskeep. Captain Grosvenor's command and Colonel Carlton's skirmishers appear to have vied with each other in gallantry, and from all the facts I can learn reached the railroad about the same time and commenced the work of destroying it. Colonel Este had sent forward the Seventy-. fifth Indiana, which I am told gallantly co-operated with Colonel Carlton in driving back the enemy's cavalry and taking position on the railroad. About night Colonel Carlton, finding that the enemy was bringing forward
cond line moving at the same time, with the proper interval. Shortly after the brigade had arrived at the top of the hill it was observed that General Hascall's brigade, of General Judah's division, was moving in a double line of battle to the front, on a line of direction which brought it upon the rear of this brigade. Not understanding the nature of the movement, our lines stood fast until General Hascall's front line had passed our front line and his rear line our rear line. See map: Zzz At this time General Baird gave the order that this brigade should advance as General Hascall's brigade advanced, and the troops were immediately ordered forward, advancing in the order they had assumed. The face of the country was very rough, rising and falling in a succession of high hills and deep gorges, covered with an almost impenetrably dense growth of timber, rendering it a very difficult matter for troops to advance in line. On reaching the second line of hills we passed our
Michael Stone (search for this): chapter 155
serving with the regiments, their labors have been constant, unremitting, and arduous. I cannot speak in detail of their good conduct; the limits of my report will not admit. I cannot, however, omit to mention the brilliant gallantry of Capt. Michael Stone, Thirty-first Ohio, who, on the morning of the 5th instant, in charge of the skirmish line, charged the rebel rifle-pits, taking the works and capturing 2 lieutenants and 54 non-commissioned officers and privates. The command has been wel) were killed or wounded during the day. Each of my other regiments, especially the Thirty-first and Seventeenth Ohio, suffered severely whilst we occupied this position. It was here the noble young Ruffner gave up his life for his country. Captains Stone and Barber, of the Thirty-first Ohio, were both wounded here, the latter severely in the head. The enemy had laid a firm hold upon the Utoy Hills. On the — of August we challenged his right to hold them by a bold advance, and day after day
J. M. Ruffner (search for this): chapter 155
ose within his lines, compelling him to keep his men constantly covered behind his works. About 100 men of the Eighty-second Indiana were sent forward to fight for this new position, whilst the main line was advanced and the position fortified. Almost one-fourth of this gallant little band (22) were killed or wounded during the day. Each of my other regiments, especially the Thirty-first and Seventeenth Ohio, suffered severely whilst we occupied this position. It was here the noble young Ruffner gave up his life for his country. Captains Stone and Barber, of the Thirty-first Ohio, were both wounded here, the latter severely in the head. The enemy had laid a firm hold upon the Utoy Hills. On the — of August we challenged his right to hold them by a bold advance, and day after day and night after night, until the 11th, did we hold him in a deadly embrace. At 9 p. m. of the 11th we moved about three-fourths of a mile to the right and relieved a portion of General Morgan's divisio
Moses B. Walker (search for this): chapter 155
No. 148. reports of Col. Moses B. Walker, Thirty-First Ohio Infantry, commanding First brigade. Hdqrs. First Brig., Third Div., 14TH Army Corps, Utoy Creek, Ga., August 20, 1864. Major: Early on the morning of the 7th of May this brigade, strength and the enemy's skirmishers driven back to the second line of hills. General Turchin then gave orders to Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, to advance the front line of the brigade and occupy the first line ober of men who had gained a protection from the creek and remained there being very small and very much exposed, Col]. M. B. Walker, being the ranking officer of the brigade present in the creek, ordered the men to fall back in single file, covering th remained in camp. On the 15th Brigadier-General Turchin received a leave of absence on account of sickness, and Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, assigned to the command by seniority. On the 17th we crossed the Ch
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 155
ss, by Captain Grosvenor, brigade inspector. The trains being safely guarded to a place of safety within our new lines, we moved as far as Wallace's house. At 5 p. m. we were ordered forward to report to General Davis; by his order advanced as far as the Widow Holbrook's place and camped for the night in a position to protect the trains then parked near Patterson's. On the 28th marched by a cross-road to Mount Gilead Church; remained with the teams until 10 a. in.; were then ordered by General Thomas to report to our division commander; marched with the division until near night, when we crossed the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad; took up a position about three-fourths of a mile from Red Oak Station. Remained in position on the 29th. On the 30th marched at 6 a. m. by Shoal Creek Church; met the enemy's cavalry in small force and skirmished with it about one mile, to house, killing 1 and capturing 2 of the enemy ; took up a strong position; sent forward the Ninety-second Ohio for p
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